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Kimberly Dark

The Daddies is a love letter to masculinity, a kaleidoscope of its pleasures and horrors. The question “Who’s your Daddy?” started showing up in mainstream cultural references during the 1990s. Those words can be spoken as a question, or a challenge, as a flirtation, a joke, or a threat. It’s all about inflection, intention, and who’s asking. Apparently, we have so much shared cultural meaning about “Daddy” the speakers and listeners can simply intuit meaning and proceed to laugh at the joke, or experience the shame, as appropriate. But who is Daddy in American culture? The Daddies aims to find out more than who – but how the process of knowing Daddy can prompt readers to know themselves and their society. This allegory about patriarchy unfolds as a kinky lesbian Daddy/girl love story. Daddy-ness is situated in all people, after all, and we each share responsibility for creating a fairer world. The Daddies can be used as a springboard for discussion in courses in sociology, gender and women's studies, cultural studies, sexuality studies and communication. As a work of fiction, The Daddies can also be enjoyed by general audiences.

School Space and its Occupation

Conceptualising and Evaluating Innovative Learning Environments

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Edited by Scott Alterator and Craig Deed

School Space and its Occupation addresses the ongoing and pressing need for justification of education and environmental innovation. Further, the increasingly important work of evaluating the new learning spaces brings attention to the need for conceptual and methodological clarity.

The editors have assembled a collection of leading authors to explore the links between education and design, progression of ideas in education and architecture, as well as making sense of pedagogical trends and spatial and design relevance. Post-occupancy evaluation is capable of informing both educational and architectural questions to generate sustainable adaptations for educators and designers. Part 2 focuses on the occupancy phase and examines the lived experience of schools to draw conclusions and make recommendations focused impacts and methodological progression.

Contributors: Renae Acton, Scott Alterator, Benjamin Cleveland, Craig Deed, Matthew Dwyer, Debra Edwards, Neil Gislason, Wesley Imms, Peter Lippman, Elizabeth Matthews, Marcus Morse, Vaughan Prain, Matthew Riddle, Warren Sellers, Rebecca Townsend, and Adam Wood.

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Edited by Lynette Shultz and Thashika Pillay

This set of essays critically analyze global citizenship by bringing together leading ideas about citizenship and the commons in this time that both needs and resists a global perspective on issues and relations. Education plays a significant role in how we come to address these issues and this volume will contribute to ensuring that equity, global citizenship, and the common wealth provide platforms from which we might engage in transformational, collective work. The authors address the global significance of debates and struggles about belonging and abjection, solidarity and rejection, identification and othering, as well as love and hate.

Global citizenship, as a concept and a practice, is now being met with a dangerous call for insularism and a protracted ethno-nationalism based on global economic imperialism, movements for white supremacy and miscegenation, various forms of religious extremism, and identity politics, but which antithetically, also comes from the anti-globalization movement focused on building strong, sustainable communities. We see a taming of citizens that contributes to the taming of what we understand as the public sphere and the commons, the places of cultural, natural, and intellectual resources that are shared and not privately owned. The work of global citizenship education is distinguishable from the processes of a deadly globalization or destruction of the world that responds to the interlocking issues that make life on the planet precarious for human and non-humans everywhere (albeit an unequal precarity).

This book is an invitation into a conversation that explores and makes visible some of the hidden chasms of oppression and inequity in the world. It is meant to provoke both argument and activism as we work to secure common spaces that are broadly life-sustaining.

Contributors are: Ali A. Abdi, Sung Kyung Ahn, Chouaib El Bouhali, Xochilt Hernández, Carrie Karsgaard, Marlene McKay, Michael O’Sullivan, Christina Palech, Karen Pashby, Karen J. Pheasant-Neganigwane, Thashika Pillay, Ashley Rerrie, Grace J. Rwiza, Toni Samek, Lynette Shultz, Harry Smaller, Crain Soudien, Derek Tannis, and Irene Friesen Wolfstone.

Forming Catholic Communities

Irish, Scots and English College Networks in Europe, 1568–1918

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Edited by Liam Chambers and Thomas O'Connor

Forming Catholic Communities assesses the histories of Irish, English and Scots colleges established abroad in the early-modern period for Catholic students. The contributions provide a co-ordinated series of case studies which reflect the most up-to-date research on the colleges. The essays address interactions with European states, international networking, educational frameworks, financial challenges, print culture and institutional survival into the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. From these essays, the colleges emerge as unexpectedly complex institutions. With their financial, pastoral, and intellectual networks, they provided an educational infrastructure that, whatever its short-comings, remained crucial to the domestic and international communities they served during more than two centuries.

Edited by Taina Brown and Alejandro Mieses Castellanos

Shaping visual literacy has been at the forefront of contemporary discourse, as images have increasingly surpassed words in becoming the primary vehicles to persuade our emotions. Visually encoded domains of symbols and signs inform the educational, public and entertainment industries increasingly as an undifferentiated whole, aided by globalizing media forces in various forms. Whether top-down, peer-peer, one-to-may, or many-to-many, this volume attempts to derive sets of rules used to visually decode patterns present in certain media formats – press, cinema, television and maps, among others – and the place of the spectator in their respective dynamics. The topics discussed transition through various approaches to deconstruct mass media influences to engage critical thinking skills, and ending with a collection of chapters dedicated to exploring their effects upon children, and the capacity to be implemented to foster collaboration-based creative learning environments.

Educational Internationalisation

Academic Voices and Public Policy

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Edited by Jennifer Olson, Heidi Biseth and Guillermo Ruiz

This book is part of the Sense Publishers series emerging from the 2013 WCCES XV World Congress in Buenos Aires (Series Editors Suzanne Majhanovich and Allan Pitman). The Congress Theme of New Times, New Voices provided the broad frame for the conference and the series of volumes, including this one, which contains research contributions focusing on educational internationalisation. Ever since the early days of international and comparative inquiry in education, the idea that policy and practice might be borrowed or transferred from one location to another has been a continuing theme. Several studies included in this volume focus on the activities of governments, the interactions between supranational organisations and states and the role of private and civil society actors in educational internationalisation.
The chapters in this volume explore how internationalisation is carried out in various educational levels and through new or expanding policies and practices. Moreover, the chapters represent diverse research perspectives and geographical regions. More specifically, they examine issues pertaining to: (1) changes in the academic profession, (2) responses to the European Bologna Process and European perspectives on internationalisation, (3) political and institutional interventions that shape educational policy agendas, (4) children’s rights and teacher education in Latin America, and (5) the voices of Roma interest groups. Taken together, these chapters explore the relationships between academic voices and those of international organisations, as well as how national policy makers interpret contrasting international discourses, and political and social factors that influence educational internationalisation processes.

Elena Xeni

Ways to understand creativity better, as well as investigate, enhance, introduce and implement creativity more effectively, are some of the issues tackled in this collection of papers. This is an essential, inspiring and uplifting book, which covers trends, methods and practices that are evolving within the field of creativity and creativity in education.