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The influence of censorship on the intellectual and political life in the Habsburg Monarchy during the period under scrutiny can hardly be overstated. This study examines the institutional foundations, operating principles, and results of the censorial activity through analysis of the prohibition lists and examination of the censors themselves. The effects of censorship on the authors, publishers, and booksellers of the time are illustrated with the help of contemporary documents. Numerous case studies focus on individual works forbidden by the censors: Romanticists like Ludwig Tieck and E. T. A. Hoffmann and even authors of classic German literature like Wieland, Goethe, and Schiller saw their works slashed, as did writers of popular French and English novels and plays. An annex documents the most important regulations along with a selection of censorial reports.     
This Liber Amicorum was presented to Dr. Peter van der Krogt on 24 June 2022 on the occasion of his retirement as Jansonius curator of the collection of maps & atlases at Allard Pierson at the University of Amsterdam. A large number of colleagues from home and abroad have written a personal and/or scientific contribution, in which they express their appreciation for Peter, or reminisce or discuss a topic from the core area of Peter's own research field: atlases and globes. In this way the rich, forty-year-long career of Peter is highlighted in various ways.

This book also contains a biography and a complete list of publications of Peter.
A Descriptive Bibliography of the Works Published in the Seventeenth Century
In Printing Spinoza Jeroen van de Ven systematically examines all seventeenth-century printed editions of Spinoza’s writings, published between 1663 and 1694, as well as their variant ‘issues’. In focus are Spinoza’s 1663 adumbration of René Descartes’s ‘Principles of Philosophy’ with his own ‘Metaphysical Thoughts’, the ‘Theological-Political Treatise’ (1670), and the posthumous writings (1677), including the famously-known ‘Ethics’.
Van de Ven’s descriptive bibliography studies, contextualizes, and records all aspects of the publication history of Spinoza’s writings from manuscript to print and assesses their immediate reception. It discusses the printed books’ codicology, philology, typographical and textual relationships, illustration programmes, as well as their dissemination in early Enlightenment Europe, in view of the physical aspects of 1,246 extant copies and their provenance.
This is the first study of Jacobean Scotland's largest library: the collection assembled over several generations by the Lindsays of Balcarres. It challenges prior understandings of pre-Union Scotland's book culture, presents the catalogue of a collection of international importance for the first time, and recovers the intellectual history behind this "Great Bibliotheck".
The volume includes chapters on the history of the library to the Restoration (Jane Stevenson) and from Restoration to Enlightenment (Kelsey Jackson Williams) as well as a detailed discussion of the library's reconstruction (William Zachs and Jackson Williams), a full catalogue, and appendices.
Author: Martin McNamara
Contributor: Michael Martin
This book aims at bringing together and providing all the information available on the Bible in the early Irish church (A.D. 550-850), drawing on some sources not well known for this subject, such as Columbanus, the early writer Apponius, St Gall list of works in Irish script, and the Libri scottice scripti. The beginnings are stressed after which the biblical compositions for three following centuries are given. The direct links of Irish literal Psalm interpretation with the fourth-century Antioch on the Orontes school are made clear, as is the presence of apocryphal and extra biblical, and possibly Jewish, tradition, in the poems of Blathmac and other Irish compositions.

See inside the book.
Editor: Dragos Calma
Reading Proclus and the Book of Causes, published in three volumes, is a fresh, comprehensive understanding of the history of Neoplatonism from the 9th to the 16th century. This third volume gathers contributions on key concepts of the Platonic tradition (Proclus, Plotinus, Porphyry or Sallustius) inherited and reinterpreted by Arabic (e.g. Avicenna, the Book of Causes), Byzantine (e.g. Maximus the Confessor, Ioane Petritsi) and Latin authors (e.g. Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Berthold of Moosburg, Marsilio Ficino etc.). Two major themes are presently studied: causality (in respect to the One, the henads, the self-constituted substances and the first being) and the noetic triad (being-life-intellect).
An Iconological Analysis of the Relationships between Art, Science and Power
In Early Modern Thesis Prints in the Southern Netherlands, Gwendoline de Mûelenaere offers an account of the practice of producing illustrated thesis prints in the seventeenth-century Southern Low Countries. She argues that the evolution of the thesis print genre gave rise to the creation of a specific visual language combining efficiently various figurative registers of a historical and symbolic nature. The book offers a reflection on the representation of knowledge and its public recognition in the context of academic defenses.

Early Modern Thesis Prints makes a timely contribution to our understanding of early modern print culture and more specifically to the expanding field of study concerned with the role of visual materials in early modern thought.
Studies in Book History, the Classical Tradition, and Humanism in Honor of Craig Kallendorf
Habent sua fata libelli honors the work of Craig Kallendorf, offering studies in several fields in which he chiefly distinguished himself: the history of the book and reading, the classical tradition and reception studies, Renaissance humanism, and Virgilian scholarship with a special focus on the creative transformation of the Aeneid through the centuries. The volume is rounded out by an appreciation of Craig Kallendorf, including a review of his scholarship and its significance.

In addition to the topics mentioned above, the volume’s twenty-five contributions are of relevance to those working in the fields of classical philology, Neo-Latin, political philosophy, poetry and poetics, printing and print culture, Romance languages, art history, translation studies, and Renaissance and early modern Europe generally.

Contributors: Alessandro Barchiesi, Susanna Braund, Hélène Casanova-Robin, Jean-Louis Charlet, Federica Ciccolella, Ingrid De Smet, Margaret Ezell, Edoardo Fumagalli, Julia Gaisser, Lucia Gualdo Rosa, James Hankins, Andrew Laird, Marc Laureys, John Monfasani, Timothy Moore, Colette Nativel, Marianne Pade, Lisa Pon, Wayne Rebhorn, Alden Smith, Sarah Spence, Fabio Stok, Richard Thomas, and Marino Zorzi.