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  • Brill | Sense x
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Series:

Kimberly Dark

The Daddies is a love letter to masculinity, a kaleidoscope of its pleasures and horrors. The question “Who’s your Daddy?” started showing up in mainstream cultural references during the 1990s. Those words can be spoken as a question, or a challenge, as a flirtation, a joke, or a threat. It’s all about inflection, intention, and who’s asking. Apparently, we have so much shared cultural meaning about “Daddy” the speakers and listeners can simply intuit meaning and proceed to laugh at the joke, or experience the shame, as appropriate. But who is Daddy in American culture? The Daddies aims to find out more than who – but how the process of knowing Daddy can prompt readers to know themselves and their society. This allegory about patriarchy unfolds as a kinky lesbian Daddy/girl love story. Daddy-ness is situated in all people, after all, and we each share responsibility for creating a fairer world. The Daddies can be used as a springboard for discussion in courses in sociology, gender and women's studies, cultural studies, sexuality studies and communication. As a work of fiction, The Daddies can also be enjoyed by general audiences.

Series:

Edited by Adrienne Trier-Bieniek

To consider gender and politics is to ask “Who has the power?” The Politics of Gender attempts to break through power structures by examining the institutional roles each play. This text takes several approaches to understanding the politics of gender, beginning with an introductory chapter focused on the major terms and theoretical approaches connected to political and gender studies.

Topics covered throughout the book include a historical discussion of the feminist movement, an analysis of the 2017 Women’s March on Washington, the nomination (and subsequent reactions) of Hillary Clinton, the impact Michelle Obama had for women of color as the first African-American First Lady, as well as the ways lesbian women’s bodies are scrutinized. In addition, this volume addresses the ways gender is litigated by examining the rights of lesbian women in Nigeria, the treatment of trans-gender people while in prison, and the connection between gun laws and intimate partner violence.

Finally, this text provides the reader with suggestions for community involvement, resources for voting, reading, film and Podcast recommendations, all combined with the stories of two women who discuss the change they created in their communities.

Disrupting Shameful Legacies

Girls and Young Women Speaking Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence

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Edited by Claudia Mitchell and Relebohile Moletsane

Much has been written in Canada and South Africa about sexual violence in the context of colonial legacies, particularly for Indigenous girls and young women. While both countries have attempted to deal with the past through Truth and Reconciliation Commissions and Canada has embarked upon its National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, there remains a great deal left to do. Across the two countries, history, legislation and the lived experiences of young people, and especially girls and young women point to a deeply rooted situation of marginalization. Violence on girls’ and women’s bodies also reflects violence on the land and especially issues of dispossession. What approaches and methods would make it possible for girls and young women, as knowers and actors, especially those who are the most marginalized, to influence social policy and social change in the context of sexual violence?

Taken as a whole, the chapters in Disrupting Shameful Legacies: Girls and Young Women Speaking Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence which come out of a transnational study on sexual violence suggest a new legacy, one that is based on methodologies that seek to disrupt colonial legacies, by privileging speaking up and speaking back through the arts and visual practice to challenge the situation of sexual violence. At the same time, the fact that so many of the authors of the various chapters are themselves Indigenous young people from either Canada or South Africa also suggests a new legacy of leadership for change.

Lauren Stephenson, Barbara Harold and Rashida Badri

In a world of constant change, the ongoing education and empowerment of women is a transformation of profound significance. In the UAE, and in Dubai in particular, the emergence of women into positions of leadership has accelerated over the past thirty years and continues to gather pace, reflecting a worldwide trend. Emirati women's entry into leadership positions in all fields has resulted in social and economic benefits across education, health, commerce and community services – all of which have strengthened the role of women at the grassroots level. As the world grows smaller, the global circle of opportunity for women grows wider. Throughout the UAE and all across the globe women are assuming their rightful place as leaders in education and in society.
The authors conducted a ten-year collaborative narrative research project culminating in a book of jointly constructed stories of five exceptional female Emirati educational leaders. The five women from Dubai are Raja Al Gurg, Raya Rashid, Fatima Al Marri, Rafia Abbas, and Rashida Badri. Through stories of lived experience, this book recognizes the expertise and contributions of these women to the fields of education and leadership; provides exemplars for educators; demonstrates to younger generations what successes and challenges this generation of women faced in order to achieve recognition as successful women and members of the local, regional, and global community; and makes their leadership perspectives and experiences accessible and engaging for all types of audiences.

Lauren Stephenson, Barbara Harold and Rashida Badri

In a world of constant change, the ongoing education and empowerment of women is a transformation of profound significance. In the UAE, and in Dubai in particular, the emergence of women into positions of leadership has accelerated over the past thirty years and continues to gather pace, reflecting a worldwide trend. Emirati women's entry into leadership positions in all fields has resulted in social and economic benefits across education, health, commerce and community services – all of which have strengthened the role of women at the grassroots level. As the world grows smaller, the global circle of opportunity for women grows wider. Throughout the UAE and all across the globe women are assuming their rightful place as leaders in education and in society.
The authors conducted a ten-year collaborative narrative research project culminating in a book of jointly constructed stories of five exceptional female Emirati educational leaders. The five women from Dubai are Raja Al Gurg, Raya Rashid, Fatima Al Marri, Rafia Abbas, and Rashida Badri. Through stories of lived experience, this book recognizes the expertise and contributions of these women to the fields of education and leadership; provides exemplars for educators; demonstrates to younger generations what successes and challenges this generation of women faced in order to achieve recognition as successful women and members of the local, regional, and global community; and makes their leadership perspectives and experiences accessible and engaging for all types of audiences.

Invoking Mnemosyne

Art, Memory, and the Uncertain Emergence of a Feminist Embodied Methodology

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Kelly Clark/Keefe

What would it mean to map out the possibilities of a social scientific inquiry that makes the relational, creative, and embodied dimensions of storied knowledge and its production prominent? How might researchers engage memory, affect, and the arts in order to intentionally and meaningfully blend the cognitive acts of discursively conveying and receiving story with the somatic states of both the researcher and participants? Across this volume, readers encounter the author’s qualitative inquiry into the lives of women academics, including herself, who originated from working-class or poverty-class backgrounds. Unconventionally conveyed, these encounters take shape as a self-speculative critique of the author’s feminist research practice, moving readers into the folds of the work to consider what constructivist, poststructural, and material feminist theories and methodologies do to the story she was able to tell at the time that she told it. Art is implicated throughout as a site for provocation, theorization, and encounter, with nine original works of visual art, including the book’s cover image, accompanying the text. Written in a tone that is at once rigorous and accessible, the book expands theoretical perspectives about the role of bodies and creativity during the social scientific process generally and about identity research specifically. Invoking Mnemosyne will be an important text for faculty who teach and/or conduct social research, as well as graduate students and advanced undergraduates taking courses in sociology of science, philosophy of science, ethnography, feminist methodology, women and gender studies, and qualitative research in education and related social science fields.

Sportswomen at the Olympics

A Global Content Analysis of Newspaper Coverage

Edited by Toni Bruce, Jorid Hovden and Pirkko Markula

"Do the global sports media continue to ignore and downplay female sporting success—or is this invisibility changing? Does the world’s largest media event, the Olympic Games, which places sport at the centre of world attention, also represent a media showcase for the achievements of female athletes?
This is the main focus of this book. It explores women’s printed media coverage during the 2004 Olympic Games and brings together the largest quantitative collection of content analyses of media coverage of a single event using the same methodology. Expanding beyond research centred on the English-speaking world, it includes analyses of newspapers published in 14 languages and research teams from 18 countries, including Norway, Denmark, Sweden, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Germany, Spain, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Canada, the United States of America, Turkey, China, Japan, South Korea, South Africa and New Zealand.
Based on comparative analyses the book provides a current picture of the place of sportswomen in global media. The comparative approach further informs and demonstrates how the methodology of content analysis can be used on printed media texts and its strengths and limitations when used across borders of language, culture and nation.
With contributions from across Europe, Asia, Africa, North America and Oceania, Sportswomen at the Olympics: A Global Content Analysis of Newspaper Coverage provides evidence of the ongoing gendered difference in sports media coverage and shows how media may play a global role in the transformation and reproduction of gender structures in sports.

Putting People in the Picture

Visual Methodologies for Social Change

Edited by Naydene de Lange and Jean Stuart

Getting the picture, constructing (and deconstructing) the picture, finding the picture, viewing the picture, being in the picture, changing the pictures—these are all phrases that apply to the fascinating world of ‘putting people in the picture’ in visual research within the Social Sciences. Putting People in the Picture: Visual Methodologies for Social Change focuses on the ways in which researchers, practitioners and activists are using such techniques as photo voice, collaborative video, drawings and other visual and arts-based tools as modes of inquiry, as modes of representation and as modes of disseminating findings in social research. The various chapters address methodological, analytical, interpretive, aesthetic, technical and ethical concerns in using visual methodologies in work with young people, teachers, community health care workers—and even the self-as-researcher. The range of issues addressed in the work is broad, and includes work in the areas of HIV & AIDS, schooling, poverty, gender violence, race, and children’s visions for the future. While the studies are situated within a variety of social contexts, the focus is primarily on work in Southern Africa. The book takes up some of the theoretical and practical challenges offered by Visual Sociology, Image-based Research, Media Studies, Rural Development, and Community-based and Participatory Research, and in so doing offers audiences an array of visual approaches to studying and bringing about social change.