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Another Way

Decentralization, Democratization and the Global Politics of Community-Based Schooling

Series:

Edited by Rebecca Clothey and Kai Heidemann

Drawing on a variety of methodological and theoretical perspectives, the case studies compiled in Another Way: Decentralization, Democratization and the Global Politics of Community-Based Schooling offer a comparative look at how global processes of educational decentralization have both helped and hindered the development of community-based schools in local-level settings across Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas. On the one hand, the book shows how increased decentralization is often perceived as essential to assuring robust levels of democratization, community participation and social justice in education. On the other hand, it is also shown how processes of educational decentralization are often experienced in local communities as a mechanism of increased austerity, privatization and segregation.

Critical Mathematics Education

Can Democratic Mathematics Education Survive under Neoliberal Regime?

Bülent Avci

Drawing on rich ethnographic data, Critical Mathematics Education: Can Democratic Mathematics Education Survive under Neoliberal Regime? responds to ongoing discussions on the standardization in curriculum and reconceptualizes Critical Mathematics Education (CME) by arguing that despite obstructive implications of market-driven changes in education, a practice of critical mathematics education to promote critical citizenship could be implemented through open-ended projects that resonate with an inquiry-based collaborative learning and dialogic pedagogy. In doing so, neoliberal hegemony in education can be countered. The book also identifies certain limitations of critical mathematical education and suggests pedagogic and curricular strategies for critical educators to cope with these obstacles.

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J.E. Sumerau

Finalist for 2019 Lambda Literary Award in Bisexual Fiction!
Finalist for 2019 Bisexual Book Awards in Young Adult Fiction!

Imagine engaging in sexual intimacy with someone you care about for the first time after surviving the loss of a serious, committed, loving relationship. In Palmetto Rose, this is where we find a bi+, gender fluid narrator affectionately called Kid by their loved ones. After five years trying to numb and escape the pain of losing their first love to a tragic accident, Kid begins to wake up, grieve, and try to rebuild their life in Atlanta, Georgia. Through their eyes, we watch as they seek to make sense of grief, pursue the possibility of a college education, and embark on their first serious romantic relationship since they were a teenager. In the process, we spend time with their chosen family of friends who navigate relationships, graduate programs, and developing careers. As the story unfolds, these friends face the ups and downs of early adulthood alongside the ways their individual and shared pasts find voices in their current endeavours, future plans, and intertwined lives. Although many characters in this story originally appeared in Cigarettes & Wine, Homecoming Queens, or Other People’s Oysters, Palmetto Rose may be read as a stand-alone novel.

Palmetto Rose may be used as an educational tool for people seeking to better understand growing numbers of openly bisexual, transgender, and poly people; as a supplemental reading for courses across disciplines dealing with gender, sexualities, relationships, families, the life course, narratives, emotions, the American south, identities, culture, and / or intersectionality; or it can, of course, be read entirely for pleasure.

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Edited by Michael Macaluso and Kati Macaluso

The canon, as much an ideology as it is a body of texts perceived to be intrinsic to the high school English classroom, has come under scrutiny for maintaining status quo narratives about whiteness, masculinity, heterosexuality, ability, and even those associated with American ideals of self-reliance, the good life, and the self-made man. Teaching practices around these texts may also reinforce harmful practices and ways of thinking, including those connected to notions of culture, literary merit, and methods of reading, teaching, and learning.

Teaching the Canon in 21st Century Classrooms offers innovative, critical ways of reading, thinking about, and teaching canonical texts in 21st century classrooms. Responding to the increasingly pluralized, digitized, global 21st century English classroom, chapter authors make explicit the ideologies of a canonical text of focus, while also elaborating a pedagogical approach that de-centers the canon, bridges past and present, applies critical theory, and celebrates the rich identities of 21st century readers. In using this book, teachers will be especially poised to take on the canon in their classroom and, thus, to open up their curricula to ideas, values, concerns, and narratives beyond those embedded in the canonical texts.

They’re Called the “Throwaways”

Children in Special Education Using Artmaking for Social Change

Edited by Christa Boske

School communities identified these children as the “throwaways”-children who often experienced bullying, abuse, foster care, juvenile detention, and special education services. In this book, children with learning differences engage in artmaking as sensemaking to deepen their understanding of what it means to live on the margins in U.S. public K-12 schools. Their artmaking calls upon educators, school leaders, and policymakers to actively engage in addressing the injustices many of the children faced in school. This book is revolutionary. For the first time, children with learning differences, teachers, staff, and school leaders come together and share how they understand the role artmaking as sensemaking plays in empowering disenfranchised populations. Together, they encourage school community members to examine pedagogical practices, eliminate exclusive policies, and promote social justice-oriented work in schools. Their artmaking inspires new ways of knowing and responding to the lived experiences of children with learning differences. They hope their work encourages school communities to make authentic connections to improve their learning, capacity to love others, and of most importantly, to value oneself. Authors’ first-tellings capture the human experience of navigating through oppressive educational systems. Authors urge us to consider what it means to be empathic and to engage in the lives of those we serve. Their truths remind us to that standing still should never be an option.

Pädagogik der Sozialen Freiheit

Eine Einführung in das Denken Minna Spechts

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Sebastian Engelmann

Kinder und Jugendliche zu Verantwortungsbewusstsein, Friedfertigkeit und Kritikfähigkeit zu befähigen – die Pädagogik der sozialistischen Reformpädagogin Minna Specht (1879–1961) hat viele aktuelle Bezüge.

Wie kann trotz der Einschränkung durch Erziehung Freiheit befördert werden? Die systematische Einführung in das Werk von Minna Specht erschließt dieses Kernproblem pädagogischen Handelns. In der Lektüre ausgewählter Schriften Spechts wird gezeigt, dass es in ihrer Pädagogik um die Beförderung von sozialer Freiheit geht. Neben der Theorie und Geschichte der Landerziehungsheime, Spechts Schulversuchen im Exil, der Reeducation nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg, der Erziehung zum Frieden in einer sich globalisierenden Welt wird auch die von Specht vorgelegte Didaktik des erfahrungsbasierten Lernens thematisiert.

Religions and Education in Antiquity

Studies in Honour of Michel Desjardins

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Edited by Alex Damm

Religions and Education in Antiquity gathers ten essays on teaching and learning in the contexts of ancient Western religions, including Judaism, early Christianity and Gnostic Christian traditions. Beginning with an overview of religious education in the ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean worlds, editor Alex Damm and the contributors together demonstrate the mutual influence of religion and education on each other; the relevance of educational traditions in addressing (for instance) historical or exegetical issues; and the thoroughgoing importance of education to religious life across time and space in antiquity. Highly useful to scholars of religion, theology, classics and education, this volume affords a state of the art study on pedagogy and learning in ancient religious contexts.

The Negotiated Self

Employing Reflexive Inquiry to Explore Teacher Identity

Edited by Ellyn Lyle

Teacher identity resides in the foundational beliefs and assumptions educators have about teaching and learning. These beliefs and assumptions develop both inside and outside of the classroom, blurring the lines between the professional and the personal. Examining the development of teacher identity at this intersection requires a unique reflexive capacity.

Reflexive inquiry is both established and continually emerging. At its most basic, reflexivity refers to researchers’ consciousness of their role in and effect on both the act of doing research and arriving at research findings. In making central the role of the researcher in the research process, reflexive inquiry interrogates agency while examining philosophical notions about the nature of knowledge.

While advancements have been made in investigating the relationship between teacher knowledge and teacher practice, the research often fails to connect this meaning with self-knowledge and issues of identity. Through a consideration of these tenets, the authors in this collection embrace critical, qualitative, creative, and arts-integrated approaches to examine ways that reflexive inquiry supports studies in teacher identity. Moving between theory and lived experience, the authors individually and collectively lay bare teacher identity as negotiated while evidencing the epistemological merits of reflexive inquiry.

Johann Friedrich Herbart

Einführung mit zentralen Texten

Ralf Koerrenz and Rotraud Coriand

Johann Friedrich Herbart hat das Verständnis von Pädagogik als Theorie und Praxis geprägt. Das Studienbuch bietet zentrale Texte Herbarts mit einleitenden Kommentaren und eine biographische Skizze zu Leben und Werk.

Johann Friedrich Herbart (geboren 1776 in Oldenburg, gestorben 1841 in Göttingen) gehört zu den wirkungsmächtigen Pädagogen der Neuzeit. Anerkannt auch als Philosoph und als Psychologe, liegt der Schwerpunkt der Rezeption seines Werkes im Bereich der Schul- und Unterrichtsentwicklung sowie der pädagogischen Theoriebildung. Seine bleibende Relevanz ist darin begründet, dass an seinem Werk die Grundlage pädagogischen Denkens und Handelns insgesamt studiert werden kann.

Die Knöpfe

Die Reise zum Mittelpunkt des Selbst

Ralf Koerrenz

Eine Parabel über das Leben, die Luft, die Liebe und einen Weg, auf dem man sich selbst entdecken kann. Poesie als Sprache, die Wissen schafft.

Aus dem Inhalt:

Es ist, was es ist – dieser bescheiden anmutende Satz war Vater und Mutter zugleich von einem Wesen, dessen Name kein Name ist und das doch – so bleibt zu hoffen – ein jeder und eine jede kennt.
Wie ein Lufthauch, ein dünner, sanft gleitender Lufthauch weht das Wesen durch die Welt.
Der Lufthauch flüstert das Leben in unser aller Herz.
Der Lufthauch entsteht, er bleibt und breitet sich aus, zuweilen entschwindet er.
Nur unser Atem – sanft, mutig und verletzlich – braucht ihn, weil sonst unser Herz zu erstarren droht.
Nichts ist so aufregend, so unendlich aufregend, als den Lufthauch wachsen zu sehen, wie er sich ausbreitet unter Menschen.
Dieses flüchtige Wesen ist eine prächtige Gestalt, wohl die prächtigste auf Erden.
Doch bis diese Pracht zur Entfaltung kommen kann, muss er, der Lufthauch, einen langen Weg beschreiten.


Eine zauberhafte, luftigleichte Parabel über Identität und Persönlichkeit. Ein poetisch-philosophisches Lehrstück, das von der ersten bis zur letzten Zeile fesselt.