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Foreword by Michael Apple
This book presents yet another compelling argument about the lives and struggles of new immigrant youth in public schools and demands the attention of educators, policy- makers and academics. In the post September 11th political, economic and social climate there are silenced and forgotten young immigrants in our schools. Racist nativism, Islamophobia and hegemonic discourse have in many ways legitimized the false information and emerging stereotypes that are disseminated by popular culture and the media. From the perspective of working class Sikh youth, who have unduly borne the brunt of such hostility and racial profiling, we learn about their daily lives both in their communities and schools. The youth engaged in identity politics and occupied contradictory hybrid spaces of being neither here nor there. Attempts to transplant religious identities led to personal battles of self definition and transformation. In contrast to the available literature on the Asian American “model minority”, Verma explores the working class experience of South Asian families who face downward economic mobility, limited opportunities, low academic achievement, racism and marginalization from both their communities and the mainstream public. Hidden under the umbrella of the model minority stereotype, the needs of working class South Asian youth are largely compromised as their engagement from school plummets. In the midst of shifting politics of belonging, citizenship and nation-building, the reader is drawn to listen to the personal stories, hopes and dreams of youth who face uncertain realities and doubts about the grandeur of the “American dream”.
The British Muslim Perspective
This important book draws together and integrates several strands in educational policy. It offers a perspective on the role of Britain’s increasing Muslim population, and the need for Citizenship Education for all school pupils which can allow young Muslims to integrate in ways which meet their legitimate needs for expression of religious values, and which fosters tolerance in both Muslim pupils and in their peers, as well as responsible participation in the wider democracy.
The book explains clearly the meaning of education and citizenship in Islam, and argues that the practice of Islam encourages its adherents both to tolerate other religions, and the societies in which Islamic minorities have settled. In this account, there is no logic, morality or theological support for violent acts against the state. However, increasing Islamophobia, misdirected against Muslim youth in Britain, has forced a reappraisal of identity. This combined with increasing dissatisfaction of Muslim parents on the failure of mainstream schools to tolerate the religious aspirations of their children, has led to the setting up of a number of Muslim schools in Britain.
Recent government actions to introduce Citizenship Education in all schools as a means of fostering tolerance and countering political apathy are evaluated in a study of five “best practice” Muslim schools, and five similar schools serving a wider religious population. Results show the general success of Citizenship Education in the Muslim schools studied, and support the argument that Islamic education can support Citizenship Education in socially productive ways.
While focussed on Britain, this book is an important comparative study of education, sociology and social policy, and deserves to be read by trainee teachers, undergraduates, and policy makers in the fields of education and social planning.
An International Examination of Education
The Destructive Path of Neoliberalism: An International Examination, a compilation of twelve essays by leading scholars and educators, sheds light on the social, political, economic, and historical forces behind the rise of neoliberalism, the dominant ideological doctrine impacting developments in schools and other social contexts across the globe for over thirty years. Several authors provide rich empirical data from schools across the globe to capture how neoliberal imperatives, discourses, and practices are impacting teachers, students, and communities at today’s historical juncture. Finally, several contributors have developed pedagogical initiatives, suggest policy considerations, and convey theoretical insights designed to assist us in the struggle against the corporatization of schooling and social life.
Implications for India, China and America
In Education for Innovation: Implications for India, China and America, distinguished thought leaders explore cutting-edge questions such as: Can inventiveness and ingenuity be taught and nurtured in schools and colleges? What are the most effective educational strategies to promote these abilities? How are vibrant economies driven by innovation? What is the relationship between education for innovation and national competitiveness or economic development?
Focusing on the Worlds’ three most populous countries and largest economies, this book provides a forum for international experts to address a range of critically important issues related to higher education and its role in creating innovative societies.
A wide diversity of educators, policymakers and corporate representatives who are dependent on innovation as the well-spring of their success will benefit from the perspectives provided by this volume. The contributors’ critical analyses will be of value to higher education faculty and administrators; government officials interested in innovation, education policy, and national economic and workforce development; CEOs and other officials from the online education community and high tech corporate industries. Recent focus in all three countries on higher education as a resource for national economic advancement makes the book especially timely.
Reflections on Local Realities, Practices, and Reforms
Editor: Everard Weber
The literature on Educational Change has been dominated by research published in the established, liberal democracies. This volume examines Educational Change in South Africa, a country undergoing rapid social and political change, and situated geographically, historically and culturally in the South. What are the meanings and processes of change? How do we explain the contours and contexts of change? What has changed? What has remained the same?
Critical Perspectives
Concern with learning throughout life has become pervasive in market-driven societies. Will most workers need to become more continuous learners in a new knowledge-based economy or will much of their learning be ignored or devalued in relation to their work? These papers critically assess dominant views of learning and work. The book is unique in examining changing relations between learning and work in terms of unpaid work and informal learning as well as paid employment and formal education. The book is organized in terms of five basic themes. GENERAL PERSPECTIVES assesses learning and work relations in the “new economy” in terms of different concepts of learning and work and contending theories of education-employment relations. SOCIAL JUSTICE looks at uneven dislocating effects of globalization on gender discrimination in information technology work, working conditions in the public sector, student transitions to work, and disability in work and learning. PRECARIOUS EMPLOYMENT analyzes the general working conditions and learning constraints of temporary, part-time workers, with a particular focus on call centre and garment workers. APPRENTICESHIPS offers an international review of the nature and future trajectory of apprenticeship systems and a case study of the challenges of a high school trades preparation program. MULTIPLE LITERACIES identifies needed abilities including coping with diverse cultures, languages and environmental change, as well as use of information technologies.
The material in this volume emerges from the conference on “The Future of Lifelong Learning and Work” held at the University of Toronto in June, 2005. This conference was one of the cluminating efforts of the Work and Lifelong Learning international research network based in Canada. The contributions were produced by members of this network as well as associates of the Centre for the Study of Education and Work at OISE/UT, and are complemented by the work of selected, leading international voices in the field of learning and work.
Uncovering Racial Politics in the Post Modern Society
With admirable clarity and directness, George Dei exposes the tendency towards the racial re-feudalization of the contemporary public sphere in Canada and, by association, other post-industrial societies. He points to the enormous opportunity costs imposed on racial minorities in the new millennium as a consequence. In RACISTS BEWARE: UNCOVERING RACIAL POLITICS IN THE POSTMODERN SOCIETY, Dei identifies and subjects to close scrutiny the new race-bending logics of what he calls “postmodern” societies in which the dwellers of the suburbs and members of the itinerant white professional middle class (the great beneficiaries of late capitalism and neoliberalization of the economy) now have become the new social plaintiff turning the complaint of racial inequality and discrimination on the heads of those most oppressed. If Gayatri Spivak asks “Can the subaltern speak?” then Dei brilliantly poses the question: “When will Anglo-dominant groups, even critical ones, ever listen?” This book is likely to provoke and influence discussion on racial antagonism for a long, long time to come.
Research and Policy Discourses, Practices and Future Prospects
Editors: Joan Forbes and Cate Watson
This is an important and timely collection in which recent research and interpretations are reported and debated. The papers provide a scholarly analysis of a range of significant issues, complexities and recurring themes. They provide theoretical, empirical and practical perspectives on what is involved in co-working and explore the ambiguities, contradictions and fragmentations in a new policy area that cuts across the remits previously held by a number of government departments. Overall, the papers provide a considered and wide-ranging critique of the key research and policy discourses that seek to influence the reformation of services and to remodel interprofessional and interagency working practices. In particular, the collection examines the ways in which the integration of services is operating in practice in the discrete policy contexts of the UK countries; the leadership and management of collaborative working and workforce remodelling; and whether, in addressing the hard questions of the form/s that future school services should take, there are any ‘global solutions’ from new research or from other places that might fruitfully be applied. In addressing these policy developments the collection has multiple readerships in mind and seeks to be both academic and policy relevant.
Confronting a Curriculum of Orthodoxy through Pluralistic Models
This book is a must read for academics, policy-makers and teachers who grapple with policy and pedagogical decisions about what to include or exclude in schools that cater to diverse stakeholders. Much has been written about controversial, litigious school censorship controversies relating to text and library books. Post-September 11th, these have expanded to banning of religious clothing and symbols. Court challenges emerge in the context of a global and political media backdrop that consistently reinforces anti-Muslim sentiment. The re-emergence of an extreme right-wing religious backlash against liberal civil liberties that endorse homosexuality, feminism, religious and racial equality create formidable dilemmas for educators, further complicated by the blurred boundaries of free expression, safety and privacy in cyber-space, as students increasingly communicate on-line. Shariff and Johnny argue that censorship is deeply rooted in hegemonic perspectives that sustain neo-colonial privilege and silence the social, historical and intellectual contributions of some students. This “curriculum of orthodoxy” supports discriminatory political/media stereotypes of non-Caucasian ethnic groups through “selection” that is in fact “censorship.” The authors introduce a Critical Legal Literacy model for teacher education that combines legal and digital literacies with critical educational pedagogy to help educators meet contemporary challenges through pluralistic, ethical and educational decisions.
"Education and learning for democracy take place in a wide variety of contexts worldwide. Traditionally, children are prepared to become responsible citizens in families and schools. In non-formal settings and in their lived experience, adults engage in democratic practices. Some people are active members of political parties or trade unions; others take responsibilities in associations of civil society. Still others engage in participatory practices in labor organizations. New practices and understandings of learning for democracy are often attempts to deal with transformations taking place in the contexts in which people operate. They experience the limits of representative democracy and try to enrich it with practices of direct democracy, thereby creating new learning opportunities for the participants involved. Theoretical aspects of learning in democratic practices are explored in Part I of this book. Part II describes examples of learning in political and social action, while Part III describes examples of democratic practices on the shop floor. Together the book delivers an introduction to the field of education for democracy for both social scientists and practitioners interested in ways to support the learning of democracy. Because of it comprehensive character, the book can be used also as a textbook in graduate and post-graduate courses."