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Sci-Book

STEPS to STEM – Student Science Notebook

Aaron D. Isabelle and Gilbert A. Zinn

A “Sci-Book” or “Science Notebook” serves as an essential companion to the science curriculum supplement, STEPS to STEM. As students learn key concepts in the seven “big ideas” in this program (Electricity & Magnetism; Air & Flight; Water & Weather; Plants & Animals; Earth & Space; Matter & Motion; Light & Sound), they record their ideas, plans, and evidence. There is ample space for students to keep track of their observations and findings, as well as a section to reflect upon the use of “Science and Engineering Practices” as set forth in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).
Using a science notebook is reflective of the behavior of scientists. One of the pillars of the Nature of Science is that scientists must document their work to publish their research results; it is a necessary part of the scientific enterprise. This is important because STEPS to STEM is a program for young scientists who learn within a community of scientists. Helping students to think and act like scientists is a critical feature of this program. Students learn that they need to keep a written record if they are to successfully share their discoveries and curiosities with their classmates and with the teacher. Teachers should also model writing in science to help instill a sense of purpose and pride in using and maintaining a Sci-Book. Lastly, students’ documentation can serve as a valuable form of authentic assessment; teachers can utilize Sci-Books to monitor the learning process and the development of science skills.

A Companion to Interdisciplinary STEM Project-Based Learning

For Educators by Educators (Second Edition)

Edited by Robert M. Capraro, Mary Margaret Capraro, Jennifer G. Whitfield and Matthew J. Etchells

This text contains 24 Project-Based Learning (PBL) lessons written by high school teachers (adaptable for middle school) that include lesson appropriate for all subjects. All the PBL lessons in the book were used in urban high-school classrooms. The lessons were developed over a three-year period while working with the Aggie Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Center. The PBL lessons are mostly extended activities but adaptable to various situations and are interdisciplinary covering science, mathematics, technology, engineering, social studies, and language arts objectives. Each chapter contains the information necessary to implement each lesson, including handouts, scenario descriptions, rubrics for scoring, and all the elements likely to ensure successful implementation. All lessons include both formative and summative assessment tools as well as a separate section on assessment with sample multiple-choice items matched to high-stakes assessments common in most states. This practical book is the perfect companion to the handbook for learning about implementing PBLs: Project-based Learning: An Integrated Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Approach.

Bettina Roesken

Hidden Dimensions in the Professional Development of Mathematics Teachers presents the field of mathematics teacher professional development both from a theoretical and an empirical perspective. In particular, the initiative Mathematics Done Differently that has been run in Germany is presented, in whose context the data of the empirical study was gathered.
The empirical findings led to postulating a model describing teachers’ individual growth pathways and to providing implications for constructing practices that are based on what teachers really need.

Jürgen Maasz and Wolfgang Schlöglmann

During the last fifteen years, research on affect has been of considerable interest to the mathematics education community. Researchers with an interest in mathematics and gender had a look at aspects of affect in their research studies right from the beginning. Similarly many studies of mathematical problem solving had a growing interest in affect. The main focus of research are now student beliefs and teacher beliefs which are identified as important factors for those influencing learning and teaching.
The thirteen chapters of this book involve many aspect of research on affect like theoretical problems of defining beliefs, the complex relationship between content knowledge and affect, espoused beliefs and teaching practice, domain-specific beliefs as well as the relationship between special learning conditions and affective reactions.

Edited by Jinfa Cai, Gabriele Kaiser, Bob Perry and Ngai-Ying Wong

What is effective mathematics teaching? This book represents the first purposeful cross-cultural collection of studies to answer this question from teachers’ perspectives. It focuses particularly on how teachers view effective teaching of mathematics. Teachers’ voices are heard and celebrated throughout the studies reported in this volume. These studies are drawn from many parts of the world representing both Eastern and Western cultural traditions. The editors and authors have deliberately included the views of teachers and educators from different cultural backgrounds, taking into account that beliefs on effective mathematics teaching and its features are highly influenced by one’s own culture.
The book will provide readers and scholars with the stimulus to take the ideas presented and expand on them in ways that help improve mathematics education for children, teachers and researchers in both the East and the West.

In Doubt

- about Language, Mathematics, Knowledge and Life-Worlds

Ole Skovsmose

During years a main part of Ole Skovsmose’s research has addressed educational issues. He has developed the notions of landscapes of investigation, mathematics in action, students’ foreground, and ghettoising with particular reference to mathematics education. In this book he addresses more general issues related to mathematics.
Ole Skovsmose tries to show that mathematics, like any other language, includes presumptions, ideas, and priorities. Mathematics does not provide a step out of the metaphysics that accompanies natural language, as suggested by many, who see mathematics as the language of objectivity. By investigating how mathematics forms part of technological endeavours, Ole Skovsmose explores how also mathematics itself embraces a range of metaphysical assumptions.
This observation has implications for how we interpret the most general aspects of human life. Thus, Ole Skovsmose sees our life-worlds as fabricated and mathematics as being crucial to this fabrication. It constitutes part of the human condition, although it can be a highly dubious and frightful constitution.

Mathematical Action & Structures of Noticing

Studies on John Mason’s Contribution to Mathematics Education

Edited by Stephen Lerman and Brent Davis

John Mason has been a prominent figure in the research field of mathematics education for several decades. His principal focus has been thinking about mathematical problems, supporting those who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.
Among the many markers of his esteemed career was the 1984 publication of Thinking Mathematically (with Leone Burton and Kaye Stacey). It has become a classic in the field, having been translated into many languages and in use in countries around the world. Thinking Mathematically and other writings in his substantial body of work are used with advanced high school students, with pre-service and practicing teachers, and by researchers who are interested in the nature of doing and learning mathematics.
This book is not, and at the same time is, a tribute to the enormous contributions made by Mason to mathematics education. It is not a tribute book because every chapter is a report of research and thinking by the authors, not simply a statement of appreciation. All engage with how others have taken Mason’s ideas forward to extend their own research and thinking. At the same time it is a tribute book. It is about how research and teaching has been inspired by Mason through his substantial opus and his vibrant presence in a network of mathematics educators.

Nordic Research in Mathematics Education

Proceedings from NORMA08 in Copenhagen, April 21-April 25, 2008

Edited by Carl Winsløw

This volume presents the “state-of-the-art” of Nordic research on mathematics education within four broadly defined areas:
the study and design of mathematics teaching in classrooms
the identity and education of mathematics teachers
the use of new technology in mathematics education
meanings and challenges of providing mathematical education to all citizens in modern societies.
It provides the reader with insights into research done not only by scholars from the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Iceland), but also by colleagues from the rest of Europe—and even other parts of the world.
While the principal research questions addressed are universal in nature, their investigation in concrete contexts will inevitably relate to more contingent issues and conditions. This book offers both in-depth view into the reality of mathematics teaching in the settings studied by the authors, syntheses by world renowned scholars of current problems and methods within each of the four areas, and cross-links to studies done in different countries, as represented both by this book and by the wealth of referenced literature it draws upon. Each of the book’s four sections therefore provides rich material for studies within the corresponding areas, for the beginner as well as for the expert.
The chapters of the book result from the work of the fifth Nordic congress in research on mathematics education, which was held in Copenhagen in April 2008. It includes 32 full research papers, 8 agendas and reports from discussions in working groups, and 22 short communications.

Edited by Christopher Andersen, Nora Scheurer, María del Puy Leonor Pérez Echeverría and Eva Teubal

Learning and teaching complex cultural knowledge calls for meaningful participation in different kinds of symbolic practices, which in turn are supported by a wide range of external representations, as gestures, oral language, graphic representations, writing and many other systems designed to account for properties and relations on some 2- or 3-dimensional objects. Children start their apprenticeship of these symbolic practices very early in life. But being able to understand and use them in fluid and flexible ways poses serious challenges for learners and teachers across educational levels, from kindergarten to university.
This book is intended as a step in the path towards a better understanding of the dynamic relations between different symbolic practices and the acquisition of knowledge in various learning domains, settings and levels. Researchers from almost twenty institutions in three different continents present first hand research in this emerging area of study and reflect on the particular ways and processes whereby participation in symbolic practices based on a diversity of external representations promotes learning in specific fields of knowledge.
The book will be useful for persons interested in education, as well as cognitive psychologists, linguists and those concerned by the generation, appropriation, transmission and communication of knowledge.

STEM Project-Based Learning

An Integrated Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Approach. Second Edition

Edited by Robert M. Capraro, Mary Margaret Capraro and Jim Morgan

This second edition of Project-Based Learning (PBL) presents an original approach to Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) centric PBL. We define PBL as an “ill-defined task with a well-defined outcome,” which is consistent with our engineering design philosophy and the accountability highlighted in a standards-based environment.
This model emphasizes a backward design that is initiated by well-defined outcomes, tied to local, state, or national standard that provide teachers with a framework guiding students’ design, solving, or completion of ill-defined tasks. This book was designed for middle and secondary teachers who want to improve engagement and provide contextualized learning for their students. However, the nature and scope of the content covered in the 14 chapters are appropriate for preservice teachers as well as for advanced graduate method courses.
New to this edition is revised and expanded coverage of STEM PBL, including implementing STEM PBL with English Language Learners and the use of technology in PBL. The book also includes many new teacher-friendly forms, such as advanced organizers, team contracts for STEM PBL, and rubrics for assessing PBL in a larger format.