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Gina Weinkauff, Gabriele von Glasenapp and Gabriele von Glasenapp

Drawing for Science Education

An International Perspective

Edited by Phyllis Katz

This book argues for the essential use of drawing as a tool for science teaching and learning. The authors are working in schools, universities, and continual science learning (CSL) settings around the world. They have written of their experiences using a variety of prompts to encourage people to take pen to paper and draw their thinking—sometimes direct observation and in other instances, their memories. The result is a collection of research and essays that offer theory, techniques, outcomes, and models for the reader.
Young children have provided evidence of the perceptions that they have accumulated from families and the media before they reach classrooms. Secondary students describe their ideas of chemistry and physics. Teacher educators use drawings to consider the progress of their undergraduates’ understanding of science teaching and even their moral/ethical responses to teaching about climate change. Museum visitors have drawn their understanding of the physics of how exhibit sounds are transmitted. A physician explains how the history of drawing has been a critical tool to medical education and doctor-patient communications. Each chapter contains samples, insights, and where applicable, analysis techniques.
The chapters in this book should be helpful to researchers and teachers alike, across the teaching and learning continuum. The sections are divided by the kinds of activities for which drawing has historically been used in science education:
- An instance of observation (Audubon, Linnaeus);
- A process (how plants grow over time, what happens when chemicals combine);
- Conceptions of what science is and who does it;
- Images of identity development in science teaching and learning.

Sci-Book

STEPS to STEM – Student Science Notebook

Aaron D. Isabelle and Gilbert A. Zinn

A “Sci-Book” or “Science Notebook” serves as an essential companion to the science curriculum supplement, STEPS to STEM. As students learn key concepts in the seven “big ideas” in this program (Electricity & Magnetism; Air & Flight; Water & Weather; Plants & Animals; Earth & Space; Matter & Motion; Light & Sound), they record their ideas, plans, and evidence. There is ample space for students to keep track of their observations and findings, as well as a section to reflect upon the use of “Science and Engineering Practices” as set forth in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).
Using a science notebook is reflective of the behavior of scientists. One of the pillars of the Nature of Science is that scientists must document their work to publish their research results; it is a necessary part of the scientific enterprise. This is important because STEPS to STEM is a program for young scientists who learn within a community of scientists. Helping students to think and act like scientists is a critical feature of this program. Students learn that they need to keep a written record if they are to successfully share their discoveries and curiosities with their classmates and with the teacher. Teachers should also model writing in science to help instill a sense of purpose and pride in using and maintaining a Sci-Book. Lastly, students’ documentation can serve as a valuable form of authentic assessment; teachers can utilize Sci-Books to monitor the learning process and the development of science skills.

Fachdidaktik Deutsch

Grundzüge der Sprach- und Literaturdidaktik

Edited by Gabriele Charis Goer, Katharina Köller and Charis Goer

Mit digitalen Quellen arbeiten

Richtig zitieren aus Datenbanken, E-Books, YouTube und Co.

Lydia Prexl

Kristin Krajewski, Wolfgang Schneider and Petra Küspert

Edited by Wolfgang Schneider

Dieses UTB erklärt, wie Kinder mathematische Fähigkeiten entwickeln und welche Einflüsse für Unterschiede sorgen.

A Companion to Interdisciplinary STEM Project-Based Learning

For Educators by Educators (Second Edition)

Edited by Robert M. Capraro, Mary Margaret Capraro, Jennifer G. Whitfield and Matthew J. Etchells

This text contains 24 Project-Based Learning (PBL) lessons written by high school teachers (adaptable for middle school) that include lesson appropriate for all subjects. All the PBL lessons in the book were used in urban high-school classrooms. The lessons were developed over a three-year period while working with the Aggie Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Center. The PBL lessons are mostly extended activities but adaptable to various situations and are interdisciplinary covering science, mathematics, technology, engineering, social studies, and language arts objectives. Each chapter contains the information necessary to implement each lesson, including handouts, scenario descriptions, rubrics for scoring, and all the elements likely to ensure successful implementation. All lessons include both formative and summative assessment tools as well as a separate section on assessment with sample multiple-choice items matched to high-stakes assessments common in most states. This practical book is the perfect companion to the handbook for learning about implementing PBLs: Project-based Learning: An Integrated Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Approach.

Doing Educational Research

A Handbook (Second Edition)

Series:

Edited by Kenneth Tobin and Shirley R. Steinberg

In the second edition of Doing Educational Research, we explore a variety of critical issues and methodologies. Authors include some of the most influential voices selected from across the spectrum of career disciplines. The scholars provide detailed insights into dimensions of the research process that engage both students and experienced researchers with key concepts and recent innovations in the art of doing research.
The contributors adopt a stance that is practical as it introduces beginning scholars to social inquiry, and innovative as it transforms the boundaries of conversations about educational research. Doing Educational Research appears at a critical moment in which educational researchers are pushed to align with a pervasive scientism that embraces tenets of crypto-positivism.
The book addresses logics of inquiry, underpinning cutting-edge approaches to educational research that extend far beyond limited visions that are presented through the lenses of positivism. The chapters explore a variety of methodologies including action research, bricolage, ethnography, hermeneutics, historiography, media-based research, psychoanalysis, and conversation analysis, in a matrix of social theory, authentic inquiry, critical pedagogy, and differences in epistemology, ontology, and axiology. A diverse array of complex topics are presented in accessible forms and will compel both scholars and students.

A Man Comes from Someplace

Stories, History, Memory from a Lost Time

Series:

Judith Pearl Summerfield

A Man Comes from Someplace: Stories, History, Memory from a Lost Time is a cultural study of a multi-generational Jewish family from a shtetl in southwestern Ukraine before World War I to their international lives in the 21st century. The narrative, told from multiple perspectives, becomes a transformative space for re-presenting family stories as cultural performance. The study draws from many sources: ethnographic interviews with an oral storyteller (the author’s father), family letters, papers from immigration and relief organizations of the 1920s, eyewitness reports, newspaper clippings, photographs, maps, genealogy, and cultural, historical, and literary research.
The book investigates the ways family stories can be collected, interpreted, and re-presented to situate story in history and to re-envision connections between the past, present, and future. Family stories become memory sites for interrogating questions of loss and displacement, exile, immigration, survival, resilience, and identity. Stories function as antidotes to trauma, a means of making sense of the world. Memory is an act of resistance, the refusal to be silenced or erased, the insistence that we know the past and remember those who came before.

Problemfall "Jungen"

Wie Sie Ihre Jungs unterstützen und stark machen

Series:

Frank Beuster