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Bryant Griffith

The craft of teaching and learning is like playing in a symphony orchestra; every instrument has a voice and every voice is integral to the whole. The arts, history, anthropology, and philosophy and their forged discourses offer us a series of cautionary tales about the multiplicity of ways we can see and understand our world, ways we often ignore in the classroom. In the case of epistemology, and pedagogy in particular, we have hinged our understanding on a binary of opposites engaged in a dialectic dance and a type of discourse constructed to describe and explain it. The art and act of teaching in this as-if world necessitates teachers to be public intellectuals; intellectual symbols who represent something more than just subject-knowledge expertise but serve as conduits between the discourses of our world.
Established genres and discourses are exclusionary. The vast migration of people and ideas is producing a new set of presuppositions. The manner in which we decode other discourses and fuse them into meanings, both personal and shared, is the root of both teaching and learning, giving us a window into the way that each form of thought is connected, both historically and experientially. Look around you, your school is becoming the United Nations, but it’s not so united. Don’t aim for truth, aim for understanding. Today’s students construct and deconstruct in a multitude of ways on an as-needed, just-in-time basis. Since ideas of difference are often nudged but unacknowledged, we are in danger of becoming pedagogical dinosaurs, not heeding change until it is too late.
Teaching and learning are construction zones, so get out your hard hat. These constructions are possibilities that need to be discussed and negotiated, allowing us to sidestep the traps of grand narratives and a hierarchy of discplinarity and research methodology. Our possibilities need to be forged on an anvil of diversity. These are the spaces, the interstices, where our voices become innovative and our silence offers a safe harbor. Spaces to listen, collaborate, and craft cautionary tales about our lives and the possibilities for a shared future.

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Edited by Cher Ping Lim, Kenneth Cock, Graeme Lock and Christopher Brook

Pre-service teacher education is a crucial component of the lifelong process of the professional development of teachers as it equips prospective teachers with the necessary and sufficient competencies to design meaningful and authentic learning environments that engage students in the learning process. If done well, it enhances the quality and improves upon the retention of teachers in the profession. This book is important because it attempts to deconstruct the nature and describe the practice of current pre-service courses and programs in the Asia-Pacific region, examine new paradigms of pre-service teacher education and their implications for practice, and explore emerging innovative practices. Moreover, this book’s particular focus on engaging new partners and on harnessing required resources and capacities in the process; together with the particular role that new technologies may play in the new partnerships is especially valuable. Drawing upon leading scholars of teacher education from the Asia-Pacific region, the 12 chapters in this book are divided into three main sections to revitalize and inform the scholarship and debate on teacher education:
—Examining Pre-Service Teacher Education
—Engaging Partners in Pre-Service Teacher Education
—Emerging Practices in Pre-Service Teacher Education

Teacher Assemblage

International Perspectives

P. Taylor Webb

Teacher Assemblage is a groundbreaking report in the tradition of fieldwork in philosophy, using Michel Foucault’s and Gilles Deleuze’s ideas to better understand how accountability policy affected teachers. The case study examines different vectors of power and demonstrates how teachers interacted with each other, and interacted with their immediate policy environments. This unique book provides readers with grounded insights into Foucault’s and Deleuze’s ideas by paying close attention to the macro- and micro- political worlds of schools as teachers struggle with new forms of performance accountability. The book illustrates ideas of power, politics, and policy with a unique use of surrealist art to illustrate the philosophical ideas at play in the case study. The book will have a wide appeal to teachers, teacher educators, educational researchers, policy and curriculum scholars, art aficionados, and those interested in the thoughts of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze.

Teachers' Professional Development

Aims, Modules, Evaluation

Edited by Frank Achtenhagen, Fritz K. Oser and Ursula Renold

Within the central topics of the debate on teachers’ professionalism are the problems of research-based and evidence-based initial and lifelong teacher behavior. Although the statements on professional similarities of teacher actions with those of other (academic) professionals are very plausible, there remains a central task for teacher education programs: How to develop towards such expertise—which is equal to evidence convictions—effectively and efficiently. Which role do scientific research and its results play in this context? How can research results be converted into recommendations for teacher actions?
The contributions to this book focus on central problems of the conversion process: In the first part the goal dimension is treated: Maiello & Oser emphasize the relationship of central variables of teacher behaviour as identity, professional satisfaction or self-efficacy to teachers’ professional behaviour; Blömeke, Felbrich & Müller discuss the role of future teachers’ beliefs on the nature of mathematics; Stevenson uses cultural historical activity theory to work out cognitive schemas that can be targeted in vocational teacher education; Gruber tackles the problem of how vocational teachers can be supported to become experts by discussing especially four major possible research strategies.
The second part of this book is dedicated to possible intervention approaches by which the gap of theory and practice shall be bridged. Steiner & Steiner report on critical learning incidents which heavily influence the micro-processes which characterize teachers’ instructional measures; Winther differentiates the trait and state perspective of motivation with regard to their consequences for the learning process; Boekaerts focuses on aspects of collaborative learning; Weber sharpens her deliberations explicitly to a design experiment on the problem of initiating intercultural learning.
The third part of this book is a report of the use and the consequences of Oser’s model of teaching standards. Baer, Dörr, Fraefel, Kocher, Kiester, Larcher, Müller, Sempert & Wyss show results of a large study on the development of teacher competences run in Switzerland and Germany. The study observes the competence development of prospective teachers from the beginning of their teaching training up to the job entry phase. This book is published under the auspices of the Swiss Federal Office for Professional Education and Technology.

Edited by Stephanie Springgay, Rita L. Irwin, Carl Leggo and Peter Gouzouasis

Being with A/r/tography is a collection of essays that explain and exemplify the arts-based research methodology called a/r/tography. Edited by four scholars who are artists, researchers, and teachers (a/r/tographers), this book is a methodology book for practitioners in arts-based educational research. In addition to an introductory essay which contextualizes and theorizes the methodological framework of a/r/tography, the book is divided into three main thematic sections that are integral to a/r/tographical research: (1) self-study and autobiography; (2) communities of a/r/tographic practice; (3) ethics and activism. The book concludes with a consideration of issues related to assessment, validity, and interpretation.
Being with A/r/tography will be an excellent core text in graduate courses that focus on arts-based educational research, as well as a valuable text in pre-service teacher education programs. The book will also be significant for qualitative research courses in all the social sciences and the health sciences, including communication studies, nursing, counseling psychology, and arts therapy. The book provides a clear and comprehensive introduction to a/r/tography. Even though a/r/tography as a research methodology is relatively new in the scholarly field, Being with A/r/tography spells out how scholarly practitioners who are artists and researchers and teachers have been pursuing this kind of research for a long time.

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Edited by Anne Phelan and Jennifer Sumsion

Like other fields of study, teacher education defines itself both by what it includes and by what it excludes. Teacher educators and researchers have spent a great deal of time seeking and attempting to eradicate the flaws in existing structures and practices, but significantly less time learning to perceive the absences. The premise of this book is that until we can identify and begin to address what is absent, teacher education will be constrained by a perennial recycling of concerns that have characterized so much of research, policy and practice to date. If teacher education is to have a different future, we need to ask different and difficult questions. This book, with contributions from theorists in Australia, Canada and the United States, addresses the challenges we face in establishing a more hopeful future for teacher education. The authors’ provocative contributions identify what is ‘missing’ in teacher education while providing critical counterpoints to existing frames of reference in the field. In writing ‘against the grain’ they open up new conceptual spaces and exciting trajectories for a different teacher education.

Critiquing Praxis

Conceptual and Empirical Trends in the Teaching Profession

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Edited by Jan Ax and Petra Ponte

Critiquing Praxis describes the contemporary state of the teaching profession based on different aspects of Dutch educational praxis, and the descriptions are followed by reflections from Australia and Scandinavian perspectives. Its critique of the current state of the profession, especially in the face of the centralisation of education policy and the decentralisation of responsibility to schools, has widespread application elsewhere in the world. The volume does not aim to judge those who made choices about schools and teacher education in the past; rather it aims to offer an evaluation of how the perspectives that shaped past choices were themselves shaped by ways of understanding the world, and by past historical conditions. In our turn, we who are making such choices and responding to such challenges now will ourselves be judged by history. That being so, we should prepare ourselves by learning from history. Critiquing Praxis offers us a unique opportunity to do that with a praxis model for critique that is mainly based on European perspectives in pedagogy and sociology.

Enabling Praxis

Challenges for Education

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Edited by Stephen Kemmis and Tracey J. Smith

In a range of professions, professional practice today is under threat. It is endangered, for example, by pressures of bureaucratic control, commodification, marketization, and the standardisation of practice in some professions. In these times, there is a need for deeper understandings of professional practice and how it develops through professional careers. Enabling Praxis: Challenges for education explores these questions in the context of initial and continuing professional education of teachers. It presents a theory of the development of praxis—morally committed action oriented by tradition—to show the ways praxis is enabled and constrained by the cultural-discursive, material and social-political conditions under which professional practice occurs. It introduces the notion of ‘practice architectures’ to show how particular conditions for practice shape the possibilities of praxis. The way these processes work is illustrated by detailed exploration of a number of cases of praxis development in a variety of educational settings, at a variety of levels—in teacher education for schools and for vocational education and training, in the continuing professional education of teachers, in educational administration, and in informal, community-based education for sustainability initiatives. The book provides conceptual resources that permit deeper analysis of the character, conduct and consequences of professional practice. It concludes with challenges for education, and for initial and continuing teacher education, suggesting that the contemporary threats to education as a professional practice call for revitalisation of the profession, professional bodies and the intellectual traditions that orient and guide educational practice.

Power, Pedagogy and Praxis

Social Justice in the Globalized Classroom

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Edited by Shannon A. Moore and Richard C. Mitchell

The aim of the text is to respond to gaps in an emergent discourse running along minority/majority world fault lines through various perspectives linking globalization, education and human rights. The editors’standpoint allows the consideration of equity in education as the foremost expression of social justice in this era of economic and technological globalization regardless of political or cultural contexts. This project continues the tradition of critical social pedagogy in creating common ground that accesses new approaches to political and classroom-based relations of power and praxis.

Professional Care and Vocation

Cultivating Ethical Sensibilities in Teaching

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Timothy W. Wineberg

This book integrates the traditional understanding of a profession—a calling to selfless service for the public good, through the pursuit of a learned art—with that of vocation—work that offers a deep sense of personal fulfilment, meaning, and identity. Professions are moral endeavours since they require vulnerable individuals to trust in the competence and integrity of someone who professes to care for them. Currently, most versions of professional ethics narrowly focus upon standards of conduct or upon ethical dilemmas. Yet these are rarely compelling enough to change us—they are not morally formative.
This volume takes a different tack to doing ethics. It explicitly targets the moral development of educators. This is crucial because as we develop our sensibilities of perception and qualities of character, we can better interpret practice situations and respond fittingly. Moreover, this approach to ethics seeks to reconceptualize our professional obligation: to embody it in more adequate metaphors, and to revitalize its relational dimension. In this view, our task as educators is to seek out those relational metaphors, images, and narratives of practice which are profound enough to shape our self-perceptions and to fund our moral formation. This book explores five ethical spheres—sacrifice, community, craft, tradition, and moral imagination—and five respective pedagogical images which illuminate the nature of professional care—servant, moral friend, mentor, covenantor, and moral companion. When critically engaged and appropriated, these rich metaphorical images provide clarity, order, and meaning to our perceptions and powerful imperatives for our own moral development.