Author: Gaëlle Tallet
Que viennent faire les rayons solaires du dieu grec Hélios sur le front d’un dieu crocodile égyptien ? Cette question est au point de départ d’une enquête au cœur de la plasticité du système polythéiste de l’Égypte gréco-romaine. Parcourant le labyrinthe des diverses communautés et croyances grecques et égyptiennes, Gaëlle Tallet utilise le fil d’Ariane de la production des images religieuses, réponses à de nouveaux besoins et de nouvelles perceptions du divin, et ouvre les portes des ateliers où elles ont été conçues, commandées et façonnées. La Splendeur des dieux propose une réévaluation du rôle des clergés et des artistes indigènes dans l’élaboration d’un hellénisme proprement égyptien, qui leur a permis de promouvoir et préserver des traditions millénaires.

Why are the rays of the Greek god Helios on the forehead of a crocodile-headed Egyptian deity? Navigating the maze of Greek and Egyptian communities and creeds, Gaëlle Tallet investigates the plasticity of material culture in the polytheistic context of Graeco-Roman Egypt. Using the Ariadne’s thread of the manufacturing of new images, suitable to new needs and new understandings of the divine, La Splendeur des dieux opens the doors of the workshops where these images were designed, ordered and crafted. Tallet offers a full re-appraisal of the cultural balance of powers in Graeco-Roman Egypt, depicting the indigenous clergies and artists as integratedactors of an Egyptian Hellenicity that helped promote and preserve their millenaries-old traditions.
Geoffrey Turner has written the definitive study of the mid-19th century excavations sponsored by the British Museum at the ancient Assyrian site of Nineveh in Iraq. Based on exhaustive analysis of unpublished archives combined with his own extensive knowledge of Assyrian architecture, Turner’s work documents the complete history of these excavations. Turner also draws on the archives and numerous additional sources to provide a detailed reconstruction of the architecture and relief sculpture in the building that was the primary focus of these excavations, the Southwest Palace of Sennacherib (ruled 705-681 BC). The result constitutes the final report both on the results of these excavations and on the original appearance of one of the ancient world’s most famous buildings.
In À l’ombre des grandes puissances de Mésopotamie. Une histoire du Sūhu à l’époque néo-assyrienne, Philippe Clancier studies the Sūhu region of the Euphrates river, on the border of Assyria and Babylonia. He reconstructs its geography by presenting the fauna and flora, and by identifying sites and the layout of traffic routes. After going back to the 2nd millennium BC to explain the origin of its main dynasty, he highlights the partition of Sūhu into two main kingdoms before its reunification in the 8th century BC and its later conquest by Assyria. Thanks to an interdisciplinary approach that combines written sources, archaeological data and travellers’ accounts, Philippe Clancier offers for the first time a history of this region in the neo-Assyrian period.
Essays in Honor of Mark S. Smith
Mighty Baal: Essays in Honor of Mark S. Smith is the first edited collection devoted to the study of the ancient Near Eastern god Baal. Although the Bible depicts Baal as powerless, the combined archaeological, iconographic, and literary evidence makes it clear that Baal was worshipped throughout the Levant as a god whose powers rivalled any deity. Mighty Baal brings together eleven essays written by scholars working in North America, Europe, and Israel. Essays in part one focus on the main collection of Ugaritic tablets describing Baal’s exploits, the Baal Cycle. Essays in part two treat Baal’s relationships to other deities. Together, the essays offer a rich portrait of Baal and his cult from a variety of methodological perspectives.

The Harvard Semitic Studies series publishes volumes from the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East. Other series offered by Brill that publish volumes from the Museum include Studies in the Archaeology and History of the Levant and Harvard Semitic Monographs, https://hmane.harvard.edu/publications.
Three millennia of cross-Mediterranean bonds are revealed by the 18 expert summaries in this book—from the dawn of the Bronze Age to the budding of Hellenization. An international team of acclaimed specialists in their fields—archaeologists, historians, geomorphologists, and metallurgists—shed light on a plethora of aspects associated with travelling this age-old sea and its periphery: environmental factors; the formation of harbors; gateways; commodities; the crucial role of metals; cultural impact; and the way to interpret the agents such as Canaanites, "Sea Peoples," Phoenicians, and pirates. The book will engage any student of the Old World in the 3000 years before the Common Era.
The zukru Festival in the Political History of Late Bronze Age Emar
In The Politics of Ritual Change: The zukru Festival in the Political History of Late Bronze Age Emar, John Thames explores the intersection of ritual and politics in ancient Syria. The cuneiform texts describing an elaborate festival called zukru invite the reader to consider the development of the ritual as a result of political influence. This book suggests a new understanding of the relationship between the Hittite Empire and the city of Emar that is best observed through religious texts.

The Harvard Semitic Monographs series publishes volumes from the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East. Other series offered by Brill that publish volumes from the Museum include Harvard Semitic Studies and Studies in the Archaeology and History of the Levant, https://hmane.harvard.edu/publications.
Author: Fei Chen
In Study on the Synchronistic King List from Ashur, CHEN Fei conducts a full investigation into that king list, which records all the kings of Assyria and Babylonia in contemporary pairs from the 18th to the 7th century BC. The texts of all the exemplars of the Synchronistic King List are reconstructed anew by the existing studies and the author’s personal collations on their sources, and part of the text of the main exemplar is thus revised. The author also looks into the format of the Synchronistic King List and draws the conclusion that the Synchronistic King List was composed by Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria, to support his Babylonian policy.
In The Cross in the Visual Culture of Late Antique Egypt Gillian Spalding-Stracey brings the design of crosses in monastic and ecclesiastical settings to the fore. Visual representations of the Holy Cross are often so ubiquitous in Christian art that they are often overlooked as artistic devices themselves. This volume offers an exploration of the variety of designs and associated imagery by which the Cross was expressed across the Egyptian landscape in late antiquity. A survey of locations and images leads to an analysis of artistic influences, possible symbolism, variance across time and place and the contextual use of the motif. Gillian Spalding-Stracey provides the reader with an art-historical perspective of the socio-cultural situation in Egypt at the time.
The Egyptian Funerary Industry in the Ptolemaic Period
Author: Maria Cannata
In Three Hundred Years of Death: The Egyptian Funerary Industry in the Ptolemaic Period, Maria Cannata provides a detailed survey of the organisation of the necropolises and the funerary workers, as well as their role in the practical aspects of the mummification, funeral, burial, and mortuary cult of the deceased, in Ptolemaic Egypt (332-30 BC). The author gathers together and synthesises hundreds of the original textual sources, as well as the relevant archaeological sources, on the organisation of the funerary industry and its practitioners, revealing important regional and chronological variations overlooked in studies focusing on a limited geographical area, a shorter timeframe, or a smaller group of documents.
An Exploration of the Link between Royal Image and Co-Rule during the Reign of Senwosret III and Amenemhet III
In Visualizing Coregency, Lisa Saladino Haney explores the practice of co-rule during Egypt’s 12th Dynasty and the role of royal statuary in expressing the dynamics of shared power. Though many have discussed coregencies, few have examined how such a concept was expressed visually. Haney presents both a comprehensive accounting of the evidence for coregency during the 12th Dynasty and a detailed analysis of the full corpus of royal statuary attributed to Senwosret III and Amenemhet III. This study demonstrates that by the reign of Senwosret III the central government had developed a wide-ranging visual, textual, and religious program that included a number of distinctive portrait types designed to convey the central political and cultural messages of the dynasty.