Restricted Access

Applied Arts in British Exile from 1933

Changing Visual and Material Culture

Series:

Edited by Marian Malet, Rachel Dickson, Sarah MacDougall and Anna Nyburg

Yearbook Volume 19 continues an investigation which began with Arts in Exile in Britain 1933-45 (Volume 6, 2004). Twelve chapters, ten in English and two in German, address and analyse the significant contribution of émigrés across the applied arts, embracing mainstream practices such as photography, architecture, advertising, graphics, printing, textiles and illustration, alongside less well known fields of animation, typography and puppetry. New research adds to narratives surrounding familiar émigré names such as Oskar Kokoschka and Wolf Suschitzky, while revealing previously hidden contributions from lesser known practitioners. Overall, the volume provides a valuable addition to the understanding of the applied arts in Britain from the 1930s onwards, particularly highlighting difficulties faced by refugees attempting to continue fractured careers in a new homeland.

Contributors are: Rachel Dickson, Burcu Dogramaci, Deirdre Fernand, Fran Lloyd, David Low, John March, Sarah MacDougall, Anna Nyburg, Pauline Paucker, Ines Schlenker, Wilfried Weinke, and Julia Winckler.
Restricted Access

City Views in the Habsburg and Medici Courts

Depictions of Rhetoric and Rule in the Sixteenth Century

Series:

Ryan E. Gregg

In City Views in the Habsburg and Medici Courts, Ryan E. Gregg relates how Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, and Duke Cosimo I of Tuscany employed city view artists such as Anton van den Wyngaerde and Giovanni Stradano to aid in constructing authority. These artists produced a specific style of city view that shared affinity with Renaissance historiographic practice in its use of optical evidence and rhetorical techniques. History has tended to see city views as accurate recordings of built environments. Bringing together ancient and Renaissance texts, archival material, and fieldwork in the depicted locations, Gregg demonstrates that a close-knit school of city view artists instead manipulated settings to help persuade audiences of the truthfulness of their patrons’ official narratives.
Restricted Access

Forts, Castles and Society in West Africa

Gold Coast and Dahomey, 1450 - 1960

Series:

Edited by John Kwadwo Osei-Tutu

Long regarded as disturbing remnants of the Atlantic slave trade, the European forts and castles of West Africa have attained iconic positions as universally significant historical monuments and world heritage tourist destinations. This volume of original contributions by leading Africanists presents extensive new historical views of the forts in Ghana and Benin, providing both impetus and a scholarly basis for further research and fresh debate about their historical and geographical contexts; their role in the slave trade; the economic and political connections, centred on the forts, between the Europeans and local African polities; and their place in variously focused heritage studies and endeavours.

Contributors are Hermann W. von Hesse, Daniel Hopkins, Jon Olav Hove, Ole Justesen, Ineke van Kessel, Robin Law, John Kwadwo Osei-Tutu, Jarle Simensen, Selena Axelrod Winsnes†, Larry Yarak.
Restricted Access

A Companion to Medieval Toledo

Reconsidering the Canons

Series:

Edited by Yasmine Beale-Rivaya and Jason Busic

A Companion to Medieval Toledo. Reconsidering the Canons explores the limits of “Convivencia” through new and problematized readings of material familiar to specialists and offers a thoughtful initiation for the non-specialist into the historical, cultural, and religious complexity of the iconic city of Toledo. The volume seeks to understand the history and cultural heritage of the city as a result of fluctuating coexistence. Divided into three themed sections,- the essays consider additional material, new transcriptions, and perspectives that contribute to more nuanced understandings of traditional texts or events. The volume places this cultural history and these new readings into current scholarly debates and invites its readers to do the same.
Open Access

Series:

Edited by Karl A.E. Enenkel and Konrad Adriaan Ottenheym

This volume explores the various strategies by which appropriate pasts were construed in scholarship, literature, art, and architecture in order to create “national”, regional, or local identities in late medieval and early modern Europe. Because authority was based on lineage, political and territorial claims were underpinned by historical arguments, either true or otherwise. Literature, scholarship, art, and architecture were pivotal media that were used to give evidence of the impressive old lineage of states, regions, or families. These claims were related not only to classical antiquity but also to other periods that were regarded as antiquities, such as the Middle Ages, especially the chivalric age. The authors of this volume analyse these intriguing early modern constructions of “antiquity” and investigate the ways in which they were applied in political, intellectual and artistic contexts in the period of 1400–1700.

Contributors include: Barbara Arciszewska, Bianca De Divitiis, Karl Enenkel, Hubertus Günther, Thomas Haye, Harald Hendrix, Stephan Hoppe, Marc Laureys, Frédérique Lemerle, Coen Maas, Anne-Françoise Morel, Kristoffer Neville, Konrad Ottenheym, Yves Pauwels, Christian Peters, Christoph Pieper, David Rijser, Bernd Roling, Nuno Senos, Paul Smith, Pieter Vlaardingerbroek, and Matthew Walker.
Restricted Access

Series:

Angelica Groom

The book examines the roles that rare and exotic animals played in the cultural self-fashioning and the political imaging of the Medici court during the family’s reign, first as Dukes of Florence (1532-1569) and subsequently as Grand Dukes of Tuscany (1569-1737). The book opens with an examination of global practices in zoological collecting and cultural uses of animals. The Medici’s activities as collectors of exotic species, the menageries they established and their deployment of animals in the ceremonial life of the court and in their art are examined in relation to this wider global perspective. The book seeks to nuance the myth promoted by the Medici themselves that theirs was the most successful princely serraglio in early modern Europe.  
Restricted Access

Series:

Edited by Isabelle Roussel-Gillet and Évelyne Thoizet

Dirigé par Roussel-Gillet et Evelyne Thoizet, La miniature, dispositif artistique et modèle épistémologique s’interroge sur les nouvelles fonctions de la miniature à la croisée des arts, de l’architecture, de la littérature, des sciences et des techniques, depuis le début des années 1960. Ludique, cognitive, didactique, la miniature permet d’abord d’approcher, de comprendre et de dominer la complexité du réel (maquette, modèle réduit, maison de poupée, diorama, aquarium, etc.) mais elle constitue aussi une œuvre d’art à part entière qui change notre rapport au monde et modifie notre regard. Contrairement au fragment et au détail, souvent étudiés, elle représente l’objet dans sa totalité en changeant d’échelle, et ouvre la connaissance et l’imagination à de nouveaux mondes.

Co-edited by Isabelle Roussel-Gillet and Evelyne Thoizet, La miniature, dispositif artistique et modèle épistémologique focuses on the new functions of the miniature at the crossroads of visual arts, architecture, literature, technology and sciences since the early 1960s. Playful, cognitive or didactic, the miniature (as model, dollhouse, aquarium, diorama…) allows us to approach, understand and perhaps dominate a complex reality. Many contemporary artists consider the miniature as a fully-fledged work of art which changes our relationships with the world and modifies our perception. Contrary to the often-studied detail, ornament or fragment, the miniature provides a complete vision of the depicted object in a different scale, and opens knowledge and imagination to new worlds.

Restricted Access

Ambrogio Leone's De Nola, Venice 1514

Humanism and Antiquarian Culture in Renaissance Southern Italy

Series:

Edited by Bianca de Divitiis, Fulvio Lenzo and Lorenzo Miletti

This volume offers the first comprehensive study of the De Nola (Venice 1514), a hitherto underappreciated Latin text written by the Nolan humanist and physician Ambrogio Leone. Furnished with four pioneering engravings made with the help of the Venetian artist Girolamo Mocetto, the De Nola is an impressively rich and multifaceted text, which contains an antiquarian (and celebratory) study of the city of Nola in the Kingdom of Naples. By describing antiquities, inscriptions, and buildings, as well as social and religious phenomena, the De Nola offers a precious window into a southern Italian Renaissance city, and constitutes a refined example of sixteenth-century antiquarianism. The work is analysed in a multidisciplinary approach, encompassing art and architectural history, antiquarianism, literature, social history, and anthropology.
Restricted Access

Resistance and the City

Challenging Urban Space

Series:

Edited by Christoph Ehland and Pascal Fischer

The essays collected in this volume unfold a panorama of urban phenomena of resistance that reach from the seventeenth to the twenty-first centuries, thus revealing the essential vulnerability of urban space to all forms of subversion. Taking their readers to diverse places and moments in history, the contributions remind us of the struggles over the concrete as well as the imaginary space we call the city.
The collection maps the various challenges experienced by urban communities, ranging from the unmistakably hegemonic claim of civic festivities in early modern London to the perceived threat posed by newly created parks in the Restoration period and from the dangers of criminality and riots in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to the transformation of the Berlin Wall into souvenirs scattered around the globe.
Restricted Access

Resistance and the City

Negotiating Urban Identities: Race, Class, and Gender

Series:

Edited by Christoph Ehland and Pascal Fischer

The contributions collected in the second volume of Resistance and the City are devoted to the three markers of identity that cultural studies has recognised as paramount for our understanding of difference, inequality, and solidarity in modern societies: race, class, and gender.
These categories, tightly linked to the mechanics of power, domination and subordination, have often played an eminent role in contemporary struggles and clashes in urban space. The confluence of people from diverse ethnic, social, and sexual backgrounds in the city has not only raised their awareness of a variety of life concepts and motivated them to negotiate their own positions, but has also encouraged them to develop strategies of resistance against patterns of social and spatial exclusion.

Contributors: Christoph Ehland, Pascal Fischer, Oliver von Knebel Doeberitz, Barbara Korte, Anna Lienen, Gill Plain, Frank Erik Pointner, Katrin Röder, Ingrid von Rosenberg, Mark Schmitt, Ralf Schneider, Christoph Singer, Sabine Smith, Merle Tönnies, Ger Zielinski