Editor: Andrew Weaver
A Companion to Music at the Habsburgs Courts in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, edited by Andrew H. Weaver, is the first in-depth survey of Habsburg musical patronage over a broad timeframe. Bringing together existing research and drawing upon primary sources, the authors, all established experts, provide overviews of the musical institutions, the functions of music, the styles and genres cultivated, and the historical, political, and cultural contexts for music at the Habsburg courts. The wide geographical scope includes the imperial courts in Vienna and Prague, the royal court in Madrid, the archducal courts in Graz and Innsbruck, and others. This broad view of Habsburg musical activities affirms the dynasty’s unique position in the cultural life of early modern Europe.
Social Dynamics of Turbulent Theatrical Events
Since the beginning of theatre history, scandals have taken place and the variety of causes, processes and types of interactions makes them an interesting object of study. Theatre scandals often indicate clashes with a dominant ideology or with the ideology of a particular group in society. Sometimes, following a scandal, the attacked ideology changes and incorporates the possibility of the aesthetics or themes that caused the clash. In this way, scandals can cause dynamic changes within cultural systems.
Next to theoretical considerations the contributors, all members of the IFTR Theatrical Event Working Group, present in their various case studies a wide cultural and chronological diversity of theatre scandals, all of which were experienced as very shocking moments in theatre history.
World Political Theatre and Performance: Theories, Histories, Practices is the second collection of essays to emerge from the Political Performances Working Group at the International Federation for Theatre Research. Bringing together scholars and practitioners from multiple locations, the book analyses a range of examples – historical and contemporary – of counter-hegemonic theatre and performance.
Part 1 offers a diachronic view of the relationship between activism and performance; Part 2 focuses on the changing nature of what constitutes ‘political theatre’ today. Case studies from Finland to India and from Chile to China are framed by section introductions that underline both commonalities and tensions, while the general introduction reflects on what a radical practice can look like in the face of global neoliberalism.

Contributors: Julia Boll, Paola Botham, Marco Galea, Aneta Głowacka, Pujya Ghosh, Camila González Ortiz, Bérénice Hamidi-Kim, Fatine Bahar Karlıdağ, Madli Pesti, José Ramon Prado-Pérez, Trish Reid, Mikko-Olavi Seppälä, Andy Smith, Evi Stamatiou, Wei Zheyu.
Arts education research in Canada has increased significantly since the beginning of this century. New forms of arts-based research, such as ethnodrama and a/r/t/ography, have arisen and made significant contributions to the literature. Researchers in departments/schools/faculties of dance, drama, music, visual arts, media studies, cultural studies and education have been successful in acquiring peer-reviewed grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council to undertake large-scale projects and disseminate the findings internationally. The purpose of this edited collection, entitled Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2: Issues and Directions, is to provide an overview of the current research undertaken across the country, thereby providing a valuable resource for students, professors and research associates working in the arts disciplines, media studies, education, and cultural studies.

Contributors are: Bernard W. Andrews, Kathy Browning, Ranya Essmat Saad, Maia Giesbrecht, Shelley M. Griffin, Rita Irwin, Glenys McQueen-Fuentes, Laura Nemoy, Lori Lynn Penny, Jennifer Roswell, Michelle Searle, Alison Shields, Anita Sinner, Darlene St. Georges, Peter Vietgen, John L. Vitale, Jennifer Wicks, Kari-Lynn Winters, and Thibault Zimmer.
Editor: Jan Bloemendal
This is the first edition since its original publication of Daniel Heinsius’ Latin tragedy Auriacus, sive Libertas saucia (Orange, or Liberty Wounded, 1602), with an introduction, a parallel English translation, and a commentary. Centering on the assassination of William of Orange, one of the leaders of the Dutch Revolt against King Philip II of Spain, Auriacus was Heinsius’ history drama, with which he aimed to raise Dutch drama to the level of classical drama. Highly influential, the tragedy contributed to the construction of a national identity in the Low Countries and launched Heinsius’ long career as an internationally celebrated poet and professor at Leiden University.
Gao Xingjian's Theatre of the Tragic
Author: Letizia Fusini
In Dionysus on the Other Shore, Letizia Fusini argues that throughout his early exile years (late 1980s-1990s), Gao Xingjian gradually moved away from Absurdist Drama to develop a dramaturgical system with tragic characteristics. Drawing on a range of contemporary theories of tragedy, this book reconfigures some of the key tropes of Gao’s post-1987 theater as varied articulations of the Dionysian sparagmos mechanism. They are the dismemberment of the dramatic self, the usage of constricted spaces, the divisive nature of gender relations, and the agony of verbal language. Through a text-based analysis of seven plays, the author ultimately aims to show that in Gao’s theater, tragedy is an ongoing and mostly subtextual dynamism generated by an interplay of psychic forces concurrently cohesive and divisive.
Sorge, Wahrheit, Technik
Chor-Denken« erkundet erstmals die Zusammengehörigkeit des griechischen Theaterchores und der antiken Sorge- und Wahrheits-Techniken, denen Michel Foucaults letzte Arbeiten galten. Dabei geht es auch um ein dezidiert nicht-heideggerianisches Verständnis des antiken Theaters. Denn was »die Griechen getan haben, war nicht, in einer welthistorischen Geste das Sein zu enthüllen oder das Offene zu entfalten. (...) Es besteht darin, das Außen umzubiegen, in praktischen Übungen.« (Deleuze)
Gleichzeitig widmet sich die Studie aus gegenwartsdiagnostischer Perspektive den überraschenden Berührungspunkten zwischen der antiken Schwellenzeit des 6. und 5. Jahrhunderts und der vernetzten »Kosmo-Polis« des 21. Jahrhunderts: Detaillierte Neulektüren von Sophokles, Aischylos, Euripides und Aristophanes setzen historische Transformationen des antiken Kosmosverständnisses in Bezug zur Entstehung kontrollgesellschaftlicher (Deleuze) bzw. environmentaler (Foucault) Regierungsformen, die heute Lebewesen und Dinge immer feinmaschiger über Umweltvariablen zu steuern versuchen.

Writing and Directing in Contemporary Theatre Practice
Author: Richard Murphet
In Acts of Resistance in Late-Modernist Theatre, Richard Murphet presents a close analysis of the theatre practice of two ground-breaking artists – Richard Foreman and Jenny Kemp – active over the late twentieth and the early twenty-first century. In addition, he tracks the development of a form of ‘epileptic’ writing over the course of his own career as writer/director.
Murphet argues that these three auteurs have developed subversive alternatives to the previously dominant forms of dramatic realism in order to re-think the relationship between theatre and reality. They write and direct their own work, and their artistic experimentation is manifest in the tension created between their content and their form. Murphet investigates how the works are made, rather than focusing upon an interpretation of their meaning. Through an examination of these artists, we gain a deeper understanding of a late modernist paradigm shift in theatre practice.
In the years that followed the end of apartheid, South African theatre was characterized by a remarkable productivity, which resulted in a process of constant aesthetic reinvention. After 1994, the “protest” theatre template of the apartheid years morphed into a wealth of diverse forms of stage idioms, detectable in the works of Greg Homann, Mike van Graan, Craig Higginson, Lara Foot, Omphile Molusi, Nadia Davids, Magnet Theatre, Rehane Abrahams, Amy Jephta, and Reza de Wet, to cite only a few prominent examples. Marc and Jessica Maufort’s multivocal edited volume documents some of the various ways in which the “rainbow” nation has forged these innovative stage idioms. This book’s underlying assumption is that creolization reflects the processes of identity renegotiation in contemporary South Africa and their multi-faceted theatrical representations.

Contributors: Veronica Baxter, Marcia Blumberg, Vicki Briault Manus, Petrus du Preez, Paula Fourie, Craig Higginson, Greg Homann, Jessica Maufort, Marc Maufort, Omphile Molusi, Jessica Murray, Jill Planche, Ksenia Robbe, Mathilde Rogez, Chris Thurman, Mike van Graan, and Ralph Yarrow.
Absences and Displacements
Racine’s Andromaque : Absences and Displacements casts a new look at the dynamism, richness, and complexity of Racine’s first major tragedy (first performed in Paris in 1667), through a collection of articles specially commissioned by the editors Nicholas Hammond and Joseph Harris. Challenging received opinions about the fixity of French ‘classicism’, this volume demonstrates how Racine’s play is preoccupied with absences, displacements, instability, and uncertainty. The articles explore such issues as: movement and transactions, offstage characters and locations, hallucinations and fantasies, love and desire, and translations and adaptations of Racine’s play. This collection will be an invaluable resource for students and scholars of seventeenth-century French theatre.

Contributors: Nicholas Hammond, Joseph Harris, Michael Moriarty, Emilia Wilton-Godberfforde, Delphine Calle, Jennifer Tamas, Michael Hawcroft, Katherine Ibbett, Richard Parish.