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Diamond Sutra Narratives

Textual Production and Lay Religiosity in Medieval China

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Chiew Hui Ho

Contextualizing the sutra within a milieu of intense religious and cultural experimentation, this volume unravels the sudden rise of Diamond Sutra devotion in the Tang dynasty against the backdrop of a range of social, political, and literary activities. Through the translation and exploration of a substantial body of narratives extolling the efficacy of the sutra, it explores the complex social history of lay Buddhism by focusing on how the laity might have conceived of the sutra and devoted themselves to it. Corroborated by various sources, it reveals the cult’s effect on medieval Chinese religiosity in the activities of an empowered laity, who modified and produced parasutraic texts, prompting the monastic establishment to accommodate to the changes they brought about.

Zhipan’s Account of the History of Buddhism in China

Volume 1: Fozu tongji, juan 34-38: From the Times of the Buddha to the Nanbeichao Era

Thomas Jülch

The Fozu tongji by Zhipan (ca. 1220-1275) is a key text of Chinese Buddhist historiography. In the present volume Thomas Jülch presents his translation of the first five juan of the massive annalistic part. Rich annotations clarify the backgrounds to the historiographic contents, presented by Zhipan in a highly essentialized style. For the historical traditions the sources Zhipan refers to are meticulously identified. In those cases where the accounts presented are inaccurate or imprecise, Jülch points out how the relevant matter is depicted in the sources Zhipan relies on. With this carefully annotated translation of Fozu tongji, juan 34-38, Thomas Jülch enables an indepth understanding of a key text of Chinese Buddhist historiography.

China's Christianity

From Missionary to Indigenous Church

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Edited by Anthony E. Clark

Among the assumptions interrogated in this volume, edited by Anthony E. Clark, is if Christianity should most accurately be identified as “Chinese” when it displays vestiges of Chinese cultural aesthetics, or whether Chinese Christianity is more indigenous when it is allowed to form its own theological framework. In other words, can theological uniqueness also function as a legitimate Chinese Christian cultural expression in the formation of its own ecclesial identity? Also central to what is explored in this book is how missionary influences, consciously or unconsciously, introduced seeds of independence into the cultural ethos of China’s Christian community. Chinese girls who pushed “the limits of proper behaviour,” for example, added to the larger sense of confidence as China’s Christians began to resist the model of Christianity they had inherited from foreign missionaries.

Contributors are: Robert E. Carbonneau, CP, Christie Chui-Shan Chow, Amanda C. R. Clark, Lydia Gerber, Joseph W. Ho, Joseph Tse-hei Lee, Audrey Seah, Jean-Paul Wiest, and Xiaoxin Wu.

Modern Chinese Religion I (2 vols.)

Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960-1368 AD)

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Edited by Pierre Marsone and John Lagerwey

A follow-up to Early Chinese Religion (Brill, 2009-10), Modern Chinese Religion focuses on the third period of paradigm shift in Chinese cultural and religious history, from the Song to the Yuan (960-1368 AD). As in the earlier periods, political division gave urgency to the invention of new models that would then remain dominant for six centuries. Defining religion as “value systems in practice”, this multi-disciplinary work shows the processes of rationalization and interiorization at work in the rituals, self-cultivation practices, thought, and iconography of elite forms of Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism, as well as in medicine. At the same time, lay Buddhism, Daoist exorcism, and medium-based local religion contributed each in its own way to the creation of modern popular religion.
With contributions by Juhn Ahn, Bai Bin, Chen Shuguo, Patricia Ebrey, Michael Fuller, Mark Halperin, Susan Huang, Dieter Kuhn, Nap-yin Lau, Fu-shih Lin, Pierre Marsone, Matsumoto Kôichi, Joseph McDermott, Tracy Miller, Julia Murray, Ong Chang Woei, Fabien Simonis, Dan Stevenson, Curie Virag, Michael Walsh, Linda Walton, Yokote Yutaka, Zhang Zong

Buddhism in China

Collected Papers of Erik Zürcher

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Erik Zürcher

Edited by Jonathan A. Silk

Buddhism in China gathers together for the first time the most central and influential papers of the great scholar of Chinese Buddhism, Erik Zürcher, presenting the results of his career-long profound studies following on the 1959 publication of his landmark The Buddhist Conquest of China. The translation and language of Buddhist scriptures in China, Buddhist interactions with Daoist traditions, the activities of Buddhists below elite social levels, continued interactions with Central Asia and lands to the west, and typological comparisons with Christianity are only some of the themes explored here. Presenting some of the most important studies on Buddhism in China, especially in the earlier periods, ever published, it will thus be of interest to a wide variety of readers.

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Edited by ZHUO Xinping

Chinese Christianity is fascinating and perplexing. Yet, although its existence can be dated back to the Tang Dynasty, when Christianity, in the form of Nestorianism, first arrived in China, it has not been extensively researched by Chinese academics. This volume is devoted to this topic and consists of twelve chapters, written mostly by leading mainland Chinese scholars. These writings shed light on five themes: epistemological reflection on Chinese Christian theology; interactions between Christianity and Chinese culture; the empirical and historical examination of Christian ethics and social development in China; the Chinese understanding of the Bible as literature; and the remarkable contribution that Christianity has made to Chinese higher education and cultural exchange with the external world.

Verschmelzung der Horizonte: Mozi und Jesus

Zur Hermeneutik der chinesisch-christlichen Begegnung nach Wu Leichuan (1869-1944)

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Dr.Roman Malek

This work explores the Christian-Chinese encounter from a non-Confucian perspective, exemplified by the comparison between Jesus and the philosopher Mozi (5th c. B.C.). The investigation is based on the work Mozi yu Yesu of the Hanlin scholar and convert Wu Leichuan (1869–1944). The first part gives a biographical sketch and discusses the writings and prolegomena of the Sino-Christian hermeneutics of Wu. Part two describes the social reformer Mozi and his teachings that are interpreted by Wu in a Christian way. Part three presents the life and teachings of Jesus according to Wu as well as his attempts to establish a “Ruist” view of the Christian tradition. Part four is dedicated to the comparison between Mozi and Jesus, with special emphasis on Wu’s understanding of religion. The fifth part refers to the defectiveness of the Chinese and Christian traditions and to the necessity of a return to the “true and original Dao.”

Christianity in Modern China

The Making of the First Native Protestant Church

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David Cheung

Using mainly hitherto unstudied primary materials, this monograph studies a very significant episode in Chinese Christianity. Focusing on the origins and earliest history of Protestantism in South Fujian, this analytical-critical study investigates the evolution of the churches which pioneered in indigenisation and ecclesiastical union in China during the nineteenth century.
Some subjects studied are primitive missionary objectives and methods, the relationship between the ‘Talmage ideal’ and the Three-self concept, and the nature and dynamics of ‘native’ religious work. Extremely useful is the critical assessment of South Fujian in terms of self-propagation, self-government, self-support and organic union. The key areas suggested for future research are also quite thought-provoking. The volume is especially valuable to social and church historians, missiologists and sociologists.

Series:

Hubert Seiwert

This groundbreaking book surveys the entire history of popular religious sects in Chinese history. “Publish this Book!” is the unequivocal recommendation taken from the peer reviews.
In part one the reader will find a thorough treatment of the formation of the notions of orthodoxy and heterodoxy in the contexts of Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism.
Chronologically organized, the work continues to deal with each new religious movement; its teachings, scriptures, social organisation, and political significance.
The discussions on the patterns laid bare and on the dynamics of popular religious movements in Chinese society, make this book indispensable for all those who wish to gain a true understanding of the mechanics of Popular religious movements in historical and contemporary China.

Edited by Frederick Hok-ming Cheung and Ming-chiu Lai

Now distributed by Brill for The Chinese University Press.

Seven, diverse papers, written by ancient and medieval historians, are collected in this volume. These papers were presented at the academic conference "Politics and Religion in Ancient and Medieval Europe and Asia", organized by the Department of History and New Asia College of The Chinese University of Hong Kong in March 1996.
Although the papers vary widely in the region and time-span of coverage – from ancient Egypt, the early Roman Empire, Norman England, to medieval China, they have in common their concern about the relationship between politics and different religions – Christianity, Buddhism, Taoism and others – in ancient and medieval Europe and Asia, and the respective intellectual and cultural interactions.
Professor Mu-chou Poo in his paper explores the ancient Egyptian attitudes toward foreigners and foreign culture as an effort to understand Egyptian culture from a new perspective, and as a preliminary attempt to probe into the issues concerning the nature of ancient ethnicity and cultural consciousness. Professor Yen-zen Tsai's paper looks into the way the early Roman Empire treated mystery cults under its rule. Professor Ming-chiu Lai discusses the impact of a Buddhist ritual on Chinese religious culture between the second and sixth centuries. Professor Chi-tim Lai in his paper argues that some Taoist teachings advocated a new world order, but they were not the real force that provoked the rebellions during the Eastern Jin Dynasty. Professor Puay-peng Ho exhibits the political meanings of the imperial buildings in the Tang period and sheds light on the research about legitimacy in medieval China. Professor Warren Hollister's paper, which is also the keynote speech, points out that the high culture of twelfth century western Europe was largely the product of monastery. Finally, Professor Frederick Hok-ming Cheung examines the role of the Church in Anglo-Norman politics.
The book will furnish a basis for further investigation on politics and religion in the ancient and medieval world, and inspire scholarly inquiries into the comparative dimensions of these important historical phenomena. This volume is distributed by Brill for The Chinese University Press.