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Confessionalization · Enlightenment · Pluralization
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Christianity did not reach the modern age by straight paths, but by crooked ones: For two centuries after the Reformation, Catholics and Protestants fought over the truth of their religion. They waged merciless wars and concluded fragile peace treaties. They invested in education and culture. They professionalized clerics and civil servants and tried harder than ever to shape the everyday lives of ordinary people in the villages and towns. They persecuted witches and learned to control the fear of magic.
The Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars created completely new conditions for making Christianity plausible for the modern age.
The book describes the enormous efforts under which Catholic and Protestant men and women faced the upheavals between the Reformation and the Revolution. Many of these efforts were similar. And yet ‘religious knowledge’ developed significantly apart.
Changing Concepts of xin 信 from Traditional to Modern Chinese
Volume Editors: and
What does the Chinese term xin 信 mean? How does it relate to the concept of faith in a Western sense? How far does it still denote “being trustworthy” in its ancient Confucian sense? When did major shifts occur in its long history of semantics that allowed later Christian missionaries to use the term regularly as a translation for the concept of believing in gods or God?

This volume offers a broad picture of the semantic history of this Chinese term, throwing light on its semantic multi-layeredness shaped by changing discursive contexts, interactions between various ideological milieus, and transcultural encounters.
Politics and Religion in the Reign of Philip I (1554-1558)
In Habsburg England, Gonzalo Velasco Berenguer offers a reassessment of the much-maligned joint rulership of Philip II of Spain and Mary I of England. Traditionally portrayed as an anomaly in English history, previous assessments of the regime saw in it nothing but a record of backwardness and oppression.

Using fresh archival material, and paying full attention to the levels of integration and collaboration of Spain and England in the political and religious domains, Velasco Berenguer explores Philip’s role as king of England, looks at the complexities of the reign in their own terms and proves that during this brief but highly significant period, England became an integral part of the Spanish Monarchy.
Mantras, Initiation and Preparing for Worship (Chapters 1–5). Critical Edition and Annotated Translation
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Sanātana Gosvāmin’s Haribhaktivilāsa (ca. 1540) describes the normative ritual life of a Vaiṣṇava devotee. As it is one of the first Sanskrit texts of Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇava tradition begun by Śrī Kṛṣṇa Caitanya (1486–1533) it presents a fascinating meeting between this ecstatic new religious movement and older, Brahminical tradition.
On the basis of eleven manuscripts, this important text has now been for the first time been critically edited. In his extensive introduction, Måns Broo engages with many of the questions that have vexed earlier scholars of this text (such as who really was the author?) by exploring its extensive intertextualities.