Browse results

This book forms an introduction to the emerging discipline of “psychology of migration”, which is an interdisciplinary field of reflection and research, joining together diverse subfields of psychology with anthropological, sociological, demographic and historical inquiry on migration processes. The introductory chapter marks the borders of this borderline discipline, defines important notions and the subject of inquiry, and presents its main research themes together with prospective paths for the discipline’s development. The second chapter presents research methods applied in psychology of migration. Acculturation processes and their psychological analysis as well an impact on the mental health of migrants are the main topics of interest in the third chapter. The last chapter covers issues of mutual relations between religion and migration. Conclusive remarks on contemporary psychology of migration facing cultural and religious diversity in COVID-19 pandemic times are outlined, pointing at challenges the discipline will surely meet in the future.
Editor: Elias Bongmba
The Journal of Religion in Africa, founded in 1967 by Andrew Walls, is interested in all religious traditions and all their forms, in every part of Africa, and it is open to every methodology. Its contributors include scholars working in history, anthropology, sociology, political science, missiology, literature and related disciplines. It occasionally publishes religious texts in their original African language.

Presenting a unique forum for the debate of theoretical issues in the analysis of African religion past and present, the Journal of Religion in Africa also encourages the development of new methodologies. It reviews a very wide range of books and regularly publishes longer review articles on works of special interest. It prides itself on being highly international and is the only English-language journal dedicated to the study of religion and ritual throughout Africa. In an effort to highlight emerging themes in the study of religion in Africa, and promote the outstanding work of younger scholars, it regularly publishes special issues on current topics.

European Science Foundation Ranking A.

 Click on title to see all prices

Editors: Titus Hjelm and Anne Koch
The peer-reviewed Journal of Religion in Europe provides a forum for multi-disciplinary research into the complex dynamics of religious discourses and practices in Europe, both historical and contemporary. The journal’s underlying idea is that religion in Europe is characterized by a variety of pluralisms. There is a pluralism of religious communities that actively engage with one another. Additionally, there is a pluralism of societal systems, such as nations, law, politics, economy, science, and art, all of which interact with religious systems. There is also a pluralism of scholarly discourses, including religious studies, legal studies, history, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, and psychology, that are addressing the religious dynamics involved. The Journal of Religion in Europe encourages new research that responds to the changing European dimension of social and cultural studies regarding these pluralisms.

NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in Journal of Religion in Europe can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

 Click on title to see all prices

The peer-reviewed Journal of Religion in Japan constitutes a venue for academic research in the complex and multifaceted field of Japanese religion. The journal takes into consideration Japanese religious phenomena through their historical developments and contemporary evolution both within and outside of Japan. It explores the interplay between religion and society, religion and culture, religion and media, and religion and education; the dynamics of globalization and secularization related to Japanese religions; and the geography of religions, new sacred spaces, and hybridization of religion.

The Journal of Religion in Japan is committed to an approach based on religious studies, and is open to contributions coming from different disciplines, such as anthropology, sociology, history, Buddhist studies, Japanese studies, art history, and area studies. It encourages critical application of ideas and theories about Japanese religions and constitutes a forum for new theoretical developments in the field of religion in Japan. The Journal does not provide a venue for inter-religious dialogue and confessional approaches.

 Click on title to see all prices

Religion and Gender is the first peer-reviewed, international journal for the systematic study of gender and religion in an interdisciplinary perspective. The journal explores the relation, confrontation and intersection of gender and religion, taking into account the multiple and changing manifestations of religion in diverse social and cultural contexts. It analyses and reflects critically on gender in its interpretative and imaginative dimensions and as a fundamental principle of social ordering. It seeks to investigate gender at the intersections of feminist, sexuality, queer, masculinity and diversity studies. Religion and Gender targets an interdisciplinary academic audience but also aims to be accessible to those with a non-professional interest in the field. The journal publishes high level contributions from the Humanities and from qualitative and conceptual studies in the Social Sciences. It focusses in particular on contemporary debates and topics of emerging interest from postmodern, postcolonial, and post-secular perspectives.

 Click on title to see all prices