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Volume 4 of the Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic presents five articles on the Iliad and the Odyssey and one on the history of Homeric scholarship. Contributors look to the Ancient Near East, to medieval Japan, and to contemporary conceptual metaphor theory; they explore the interpretations of ancient readers and the contests of modern scholarship. This diverse collection will be of interest to all students and scholars of ancient Greek epic.
Brill’s Companion to Euripides offers 49 specially commissioned essays from leading international scholars which give critical examinations of the progress and direction of numerous wide-ranging debates about various aspects of Euripidean drama. Each chapter, as well as covering a wide diversity of thematic angles, provides readers with an authoritative and state-of-the-art survey of current thinking and research in a particular subject area. Recent advances in scholarship have raised new questions about Euripides and Attic drama, and have overturned some long-standing assumptions and canons. Besides presenting a comprehensive and authoritative guide to understanding Euripides and his masterworks, this companion provides scholars and students with compelling fresh perspectives upon a broad range of issues in the rapidly evolving field of Euripidean studies.
The Exemplary Hercules explores the reception of the ancient Greek hero Herakles – the Roman Hercules – in European culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment and beyond. Each chapter considers a particular work or theme in detail, raising questions about the hero’s role as model of the princely ruler, and examining how the worthiness of this exemplary type came, in time, to be subverted. The volume is one of four to be published in the Metaforms series examining the extraordinarily persistent figuring of Herakles-Hercules in western culture up to the present day, drawing together scholars from a range of disciplines to offer a unique insight into the hero’s perennial, but changingly problematic, appeal.
Editors: James Ker and Antje Wessels
In ancient Greece and Rome, nighttime encompassed a distinctive array of cultural values that went far beyond the inversion of daytime. Night was a mythological figure, a locus of specialized knowledge, a socially significant semantic space in various literary genres, and a setting for unique experiences. These facets of night are explored here through fifteen case-studies, that range from Hesiod to imperial Roman painting and cultural history. The contributors took part in a conference on this theme at the University of Pennsylvania in 2018, where they pursued a common goal: to consider how nighttime was employed in the ascription of specific values—in determining what values a thing or a person might have, or lack, in a nocturnal context.
A Companion to Byzantine Epistolography introduces and contextualizes the culture of Byzantine letter-writing from various socio-historical, material and literary angles. While this culture was long regarded as an ivory-tower pastime of intellectual elites, the eighteen essays in this volume, authored by leading experts in the field, show that epistolography had a vital presence in many areas of Byzantine society, literature and art. The chapters offer discussions of different types of letters and intersections with non-epistolary genres, their social functions as media of communication and performance, their representations in visual and narrative genres, and their uses in modern scholarship. The volume thus contributes to a more nuanced understanding of letter-writing in the Byzantine Empire and beyond.

Contributors are: Thomas Johann Bauer, Alexander Beihammer, Floris Bernard, Emmanuel C. Bourbouhakis, Carolina Cupane, Niels Gaul, Cecily J. Hilsdale, Sofia Kotzabassi, Florin Leonte, Divna Manolova, Stratis Papaioannou, Johannes Preiser-Kapeller, Alexander Riehle, Jack Tannous, Lena Wahlgren-Smith.
In The Lyon Terence Giulia Torello-Hill and Andrew J. Turner take an unprecedented interdisciplinary approach to map out the influence of Late-Antique and Medieval commentary and iconographic traditions over this seminal edition of the plays of Terence, published in Lyon in 1493, and examine its legacy. The work had a profound impact on the way Terence’s plays were read and understood throughout the sixteenth century, but its influence has been poorly recognised in modern scholarship. The authors establish the pivotal role that this book, and its editor Badius, played in the revitalisation of the theoretical understanding of Classical comedy and in the revival of the plays of Terence that foreshadowed the establishment of early modern theatre in Italy and France.
On the Life of Abraham displays Philo’s philosophical, exegetical, and literary genius at its best. Philo begins by introducing the biblical figures Enos, Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as unwritten laws. Then, interweaving literal, ethical, and allegorical interpretations, Philo presents the life and achievements of Abraham, founder of the Jewish nation, in the form of a Greco-Roman bios, or biography. Ellen Birnbaum and John Dillon explain why and how this work is important within the context of Philo’s own oeuvre, early Jewish and Christian exegesis, and ancient philosophy. They also offer a new English translation and detailed analyses, in which they elucidate the meaning of Philo’s thought, including his perplexing notion that Israel’s ancestors were laws in themselves.
Cassius Dio: The Impact of Violence, War, and Civil War is part of a renewed interest in the Roman historian Cassius Dio. This volume focuses on Dio’s approaches to foreign war and stasis as well as civil war. The impact of war on Rome as well as on the history of Rome has long be recognised by scholars, and adding to that, recent years have seen an increasing interest in the impact of civil war on Roman society. Dio’s views on violence, war, and civil war are an inter-related part of his overall project, which sought to understand Roman history on its own historical and historiographical terms and within a long-range view of the Roman past that investigated the realities of power.
From the Beginnings to the End of the Byzantine Age
This book aims to offer a unified historical treatment of all that is usually understood as “ancient scholarship” or “ancient philology” and is the first modern work to cover a period from the beginnings to the fall of Byzantium after John Edwin Sandys’ work published between 1903-1908. The field “ancient scholarship” includes the exegesis of Greek authors, the editing of their texts, orderly collections of materials useful for exegetical purposes – such as lexeis, onomatologies, collections of antiquarian materials et similia –, the study of grammar, reflection on language, and everything that can be linked to this sphere, that is to say literature and the instruments for interpreting it. If it is hard today to imagine such a work being undertaken by a single scholar, it is worth underlining the benefits offered by a volume with multiple expert voices in a field so complex and multiform. The book is based on the four historiographical chapters of Brill's Companion to Ancient Greek Scholarship (2015), which have been enlarged, updated and rethought.
The eighth-century English missionary and church reformer Boniface was a highly influential figure in early medieval Europe. His career in what is now Germany, France, and the Netherlands is attested in an exceptional number of textual sources: a correspondence of 150 letters, Latin poetry, church council records, and other documents. Numerous saints’ lives and modern devotional materials further reveal how he was remembered by the religious communities that claim him as a foundational figure.

This volume comprises the latest scholarship on Boniface and his fellow missionaries, examining the written materials associated with Boniface, his impacts on the regions of Europe where he worked (Hessia, Thuringia, Bavaria, Frisia, and Francia), and the development of his cult in the Middle Ages and today.

Contributors include: Michel Aaij, John-Henry Clay, Michael Glatthaar, Shannon Godlove, Leanne Good, Petra Kehl, Felice Lifshitz, Rob Meens, Michael Edward Moore, Marco Mostert, James Palmer, Janneke Raaijmakers, Rudolf Schieffer, Emily Thornbury, Siegfried Weichlein, and Barbara Yorke.