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from the Middle Bronze Age to the Crusader Period
Volume Editors: Michal Artzy and Aaron Brody
In this volume, Aaron Brody and Michal Artzy offer the first in-depth analysis from excavations at Tel Akko. The most prominent harbor city on the northern coast of the southern Levant, the city was a nexus between the sea routes of the eastern Mediterranean and the overland networks of its hinterland.

Stratigraphy, architecture, and material culture from the site’s Area H are presented, along with studies by Jennie Ebeling, Jeffrey Rose, and Edward Maher on stone artifacts and animal bones from burials. The volume presents Middle Bronze IIA rampart materials and MB IIB-IIC burials; transitional end of Late Bronze-beginning of Iron I finds; and southern Phoenician ceramics.

The Studies in the Archaeology and History of the Levant series publishes volumes from the Harvard Semitic Museum. Other series offered by Brill that publish volumes from the Museum include Harvard Semitic Studies and Harvard Semitic Monographs, https://semiticmuseum.fas.harvard.edu/publications.
A Companion to Late Antique and Medieval Islamic Cordoba cover the history and culture of Roman, late antique, Visigoth and al-Andalus Cordoba in nineteen contributions, from the foundation of the city in the 169/168 B.C. by the praetor Marcus Claudius Marcellus to the end of the Muslim period in 1236 B.C., when the city fell into the hands of Ferdinand III the Saint, King of Castile.

Making use of archaeological data and historical sources, combined with the latest research on the various fields under study, its authors give a compelling account of Cordoba’s most important archaeological, urban, political, legal, social, cultural and religious facets throughout the most exciting fifteen centuries of the city.
A Companion to the Renaissance in Southern Italy (1350-1600) introduces for the first time readers unfamiliar with Southern Italy to different aspects of the history and culture of this vast and significant area of Europe situated at the center of the Mediterranean during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

Commonly regarded as a backward, rural region untouched by Italian Renaissance, this book presents both a general survey of the most recent research on the centers of southern Italy, and insights into the ground-breaking debates on wider themes, such as the definition of the city, continuity and discontinuity at the turn of the sixteenth century, and the effects of dynastic changes from the Angevin and Aragonese Kingdom to the Spanish Viceroyalty.

Contributors include Giancarlo Abbamonte, David Abulafia, Francesco Caglioti, Guido Cappelli, Bianca De Divitiis, Chiara De Caprio, Fulvio Delle Donne, Teresa D’Urso, Dinko Fabris, Guido Giglioni, Antonietta Iacono, Fulvio Lenzo, Lorenzo Miletti, Francesco Montuori, Pasquale Palmieri, Eleni Sekallariou, Francesco Senatore, Francesco Storti, Pierluigi Terenzi, Carlo Vecce, Giuliana Vitale, and Andrea Zezza.
Death, the ultimate change, is an unexpected Leitmotiv of Ovid’s career and reception. The eighteen contributions collected in this volume explore the theme of death and transfiguration in Ovid’s own career and his posthumous reception, revealing a unity in diversity that has not been appreciated in these terms before now.
Author: Cumhur Olcar
Migration is no longer a movement from the rural to the urban, but rather from city to city or from the city to the metropolis in this swiftly urbanising world. This book uses new paradigms to explain why urban movements rise from the development of cities and are gradually increasing. It urges new Urban Studies to recognise that the rate of urbanisation occurring in developing regions is higher than that of developed regions and that the change is profound. A multidisciplinary approach is a prerequisite for Urban Studies to understand urban movements and the struggle for urban space in the nearby future of cities worldwide.
[Ancient Architecture in Syria: Djebel Simʿân]
Editor / Translator: Aisha Muhammed Ali Moussa
يستعرض كتاب العمارة القديمة في سوريا (جبل سمعان)، من تأليف هوارد كروسبي باتلر وترجمة عائشة موسى، 24 موقعًا أثريًا في شمال سوريا. ويُسلِّط كل موقعٍ منها الضوء على اكتشافات جديدة تقف شاهدةً على عظمة الحضارات التي امتزجت بين جنباتها، مخلفةً وراءها إرثًا سرمديًا لا ينسى.
وتأتي قلعة القديس سمعان العمودي في طليعة هذه المواقع وتعد أكثرها شهرة، وبقيت في صدارة العمارة الكاتدرائية حتى بناء آيا صوفيا، كما بشَّرت بالتطور العمراني الديني اللاحق في كل من القسطنطينية وأوروبا.
وثمة مخططات ومقاطع عرضية وصور توضح جميع هذه المعالم، وتعمل على توثيق أبنيتها وتفاصيلها وتخليد هذا الكنز الذي لا يقدَّر بثمن للأجيال القادمة.
The Ancient Architecture in Syria (Djebel Simʿân), written by Howard C. Butler and translated by Aisha Moussa, covers 24 ancient sites in Northern Syria. Each site sparks new revelations about the great civilizations mingled there, leaving behind an unforgettable, everlasting legacy.
The first and most notable site is the citadel of St Simeon Stylets, which was not surpassed by any cathedral till Hagia Sophia and heralded the subsequent religious architectural development in Constantinople and Europe.
Each monument is illustrated by plans, cross-sections and photographs documenting its structure and details and preserving this invaluable treasure for endless generations to come.
Public Porticoes, Small Baths, Shops/Workshops, and ‘Middle Class’ Houses in the East Mediterranean
Author: Solinda Kamani
This book examines neglected architectural decoration from the late antique city of the East Mediterranean. It addresses the omission in scholarship of discussion about the embellishment of non-monumental secular buildings (public porticoes, small public baths, shops/workshops, and non-elite houses). The finishing of these structures has been overlooked at the expense of more lofty buildings and remains one of the least known aspects of the late antique city.
The book surveys the archaeological evidence for decoration in the region, with the maritime sites of Ostia and Ephesus selected as case studies. Drawing upon archaeological, written, and visual sources, it attempts to reconstruct how such buildings appeared to late antique viewers and investigates why they were decorated as they were.
Volume Editors: Myrto Veikou and Ingela Nilsson
“Space Matters!” claimed Doreen Massey and John Allen at the heart of the Spatial Turn developments (1984). Compensating a four-decades shortfall, this collective volume is the first reader in Byzantine spatial studies. It contextualizes the spatial turn in historical studies by means of interdisciplinary dialogue. An introduction offers an up-to-date state of the art. Twenty-nine case studies provide a wide range of different conceptualizations of space in Byzantine culture articulated in a single collection through a variety of topics and approaches. An afterword frames the future challenges of Byzantine spatial studies in a changing world where space is a claim and a precarious social value.
Contributors are Ilias Anagnostakis, Alexander Beihammer, Helena Bodin, Darlene L. Brooks Hedstrom, Béatrice Caseau Chevallier, Paolo Cesaretti, Michael J. Decker, Veronica della Dora, Rico Franses, Sauro Gelichi, Adam J. Goldwyn, Basema Hamarneh, Richard Hodges, Brad Hostetler, Adam Izdebski, Liz James, P. Nick Kardulias, Isabel Kimmelfield, Tonia Kiousopoulou, Johannes Koder, Derek Krueger, Tomasz Labuk, Maria Leontsini, Yulia Mantova, Charis Messis, Konstantinos Moustakas, Margaret Mullett, Ingela Nilsson, Robert G. Ousterhout, Georgios Pallis, Myrto Veikou, Joanita Vroom, David Westberg, and Enrico Zanini.
Author: E. Hijmans
With this analysis of Sol images, Steven E. Hijmans paints a new picture of the solar cult in ancient Rome. The paucity of literary evidence led Hijmans to prioritize visual sources, and he opens this study with a thorough discussion of the theoretical and methodological issues involved. Emphasizing the danger of facile equivalencies between visual and verbal meanings, his primary focus is Roman praxis, manifest in, for instance, the strict patterning of Sol imagery. These patterns encode core concepts that Sol imagery evoked when deployed, and in those concepts we recognize the bedrock of Rome’s understandings of the sun and his cult. Case studies illustrate these concepts in action and the final chapter analyzes the historical context in which previous, now discredited views on Sol could arise.
With this analysis of Sol images, Steven E. Hijmans paints a new picture of the solar cult in ancient Rome. The paucity of literary evidence led Hijmans to prioritize visual sources, and he opens this study with a thorough discussion of the theoretical and methodological issues involved. Emphasizing the danger of facile equivalencies between visual and verbal meanings, his primary focus is Roman praxis, manifest in, for instance, the strict patterning of Sol imagery. These patterns encode core concepts that Sol imagery evoked when deployed, and in those concepts we recognize the bedrock of Rome’s understandings of the sun and his cult. Case studies illustrate these concepts in action and the final chapter analyzes the historical context in which previous, now discredited views on Sol could arise.

This is part I of a two-part set.