Author: Rainer Liedtke
Wie »jüdisch« waren wirtschaftliche Aktivitäten von Juden?
Ausgehend von dieser Leitfrage stellt der Band dar, wie sich die Berufsfelder, die ökonomische Lage und das wirtschaftliche Handeln von Juden seit dem 18. Jahrhundert veränderten und welche Auswirkungen dies auf ihre Integration in die Gesamtgesellschaft hatte. Durch einen Blick auf jüdische Wohltätigkeit und Philanthropie werden die Ungleichheiten des rapiden wirtschaftlichen Aufstiegs des jüdischen Bürgertums seit der Mitte des 19. Jahrhundert betrachtet. Dieser Aufstieg steht in einem starken Kontrast zu den zahlreichen Anfeindungen aufgrund angeblicher wirtschaftlicher jüdischer Dominanz, die ebenso thematisiert werden wie die Ausplünderung der Juden im Nationalsozialismus. Der Band schließt mit einer Darstellung der sogenannten Wiedergutmachung und der Probleme bei der Restitution jüdischer Vermögen. Auch die Entwicklung der Wirtschaftsbeziehungen zwischen Israel und der Bundesrepublik Deutschland wird thematisiert.
Established in 2010 to meet a growing international interest in Balkan studies, the Balkan Studies Library series publishes high-quality disciplinary and interdisciplinary research on all aspects of the Balkans with a focus on history, politics and culture. The region is defined here as comprising Greece, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania, Turkey and the countries of former Yugoslavia, including their imperial Ottoman and Habsburg heritage.

The series publishes monographs, collective volumes, and editions of source materials. Disciplines covered include history, anthropology, archaeology, political science, sociology, legal studies, economy, religion, literary studies, cultural studies, gender studies, film, theatre and media studies, art history, language and linguistics. The editors especially welcome comparative studies, be they comparisons between individual Balkan countries, or of (parts of) the region with other countries and regions. All submissions are subject to anonymous peer review by leading specialists.

Until Volume 27, the series was published by Brill, click here.
The series does not publish conference proceedings.
Editor: Katrine Wong
Eastern and Western Synergies and Imaginations: Texts and Histories is a product of east-west studies crossed with adaptation studies: it goes beyond evaluation of cultural interactions and discussion of forms and manners of adaptation. This volume brings together critical discourses from various cultural locales which have developed from and thrived on the notion of “East meets West” or “West meets East”. The 10 chapters trace and investigate cross-, trans- or multi-cultural interpretations of fictional and non-fictional narratives that feature people and events in cities and regions which thrive, or have thrived, as East-West hubs, thereby expounding multiple layers of relationship between source texts and new texts. An allegorical play, The Three Ladies of Macao, premièred in December 2016, is now published as appendix in this volume.
Carl von Clausewitz is still considered one of the most important writers on military strategy. In Prussian Military Thought 1815-1830: Beyond Clausewitz , Jacek Jędrysiak offers a new perspective on the context of his legacy, with a detailed analysis of Prussian military thought after the Napoleonic wars and an examination of the development of certain institutions, such as the General Staff, leading to a more nuanced understanding of Clausewitz’s work. The dominance of the famous figures of Clausewitz and Helmuth von Moltke the Elder has obscured much about the Prussian army in the 19th century; in this study, Jacek Jędrysiak reveals the forgotten face of the Prussian army.
Representations of Venice and the Venetian Terraferma in the Renaissance
Author: Sandra Toffolo
In Describing the City, Describing the State Sandra Toffolo presents a comprehensive analysis of descriptions of the city of Venice and the Venetian Terraferma in the Renaissance, when the Venetian mainland state was being created. Working with an extensive variety of descriptions, the book demonstrates that no one narrative of Venice prevailed in the early modern European imagination, and that authors continuously adapted geographical descriptions to changing political circumstances. This in turn illustrates the importance of studying geographical representation and early modern state formation together. Moreover, it challenges the long-standing concept of the myth of Venice, by showing that Renaissance observers never saw the city of Venice and the Venetian Terraferma in a monolithic way.
Author: Grzegorz Moroz
A Generic History of Travel Writing in Anglophone and Polish Literature offers a comprehensive, comparative and generic analysis of developments of travel writing in Anglophone and Polish literature from the Late Medieval Period to the twenty-first century. These developments are depicted in a wider context of travel narratives written in other European languages. Grzegorz Moroz convincingly argues that, for all the similarities and cross-cultural influences, in the course of the nineteenth and twentieth century non-fiction Anglophone and Polish travel writing have dynamically evolved different generic horizons of expectations. While the Anglophone travel book developed relatively steadily in that period, the Polish genre of the podróż was first replaced by the listy (kartki) z podróży, and then by the reportaż podróżniczy.
In Necessary Existence and the Doctrine of Being in Avicenna’s Metaphysics of the Healing Daniel De Haan explicates the central argument of Avicenna’s metaphysical masterpiece. De Haan argues that the most fundamental primary notion in Avicenna’s metaphysics is neither being nor thing but is the necessary ( wājib), which Avicenna employs to demonstrate the existence and true-nature of the divine necessary existence in itself. This conclusion is established through a systematic investigation of how Avicenna’s theory of a demonstrative science is employed in the organization of his metaphysical science into its subject, first principles, and objects of enquiry. The book examines the essential role the first principles as primary notions and primary hypotheses play in the central argument of Avicenna’s metaphysics.
Breaching the Bronze Wall deals with the idea that the word of honorable Muslims constituted proof and with the concept that written documents and the word of non-Muslims were inferior. Foreign merchants in cities like Istanbul, Damascus or Alexandria could barely prove any claim, as neither their contracts nor their words were of any value if countered by Muslims. Francisco Apellániz explores how both groups labored to overcome these ‘biases against non-Muslims’ in the courts and markets of Mamluk Egypt and Syria of the 14th and 15th centuries, and how the Ottoman conquest (1517) imposed a new, orthodox view on the problem. The book dives into the Middle Eastern archive and the Ottoman Dīvān, and scrutinizes the intricacies of sharia and the handling of these intracacies by consuls, dragomans, qaḍīs and other legal actors.
In La Diplomatie byzantine, de l’Empire romain aux confins de l’Europe (Ve-XVe s.), twelve studies explore from novel angles the complex history of Byzantine diplomacy. After an Introduction, the volume turns to the period of late antiquity and the new challenges the Eastern Roman Empire had to contend with. It then examines middle-Byzantine diplomacy through chapters looking at relations with Arabs, Rus’ and Bulgarians, before focusing on various aspects of the official contacts with Western Europe at the end of the Middle Ages. A thematic section investigates the changes to and continuities of diplomacy throughout the period, in particular by considering Byzantine alertness to external political developments, strategic use of dynastic marriages, and the role of women as diplomatic actors.
Contributors are are Jean-Pierre Arrignon, Audrey Becker, Mickaël Bourbeau, Nicolas Drocourt, Christian Gastgeber, Nike Koutrakou, Élisabeth Malamut, Ekaterina Nechaeva, Brendan Osswald, Nebojša Porčić, Jonathan Shepard, and Jakub Sypiański.