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A History of Modern Jewish Religious Philosophy

Volume III:The Crisis of Humanism. A Historial Crossroads

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Eliezer Schweid

The culmination of Eliezer Schweid’s life-work as a Jewish intellectual historian, this five-volume work provides a comprehensive, interdisciplinary account of the major thinkers and movements in modern Jewish thought, in the context of general philosophy and Jewish social-political historical developments, with extensive primary source excerpts.
Volume Three, “The Crisis of Humanism,” commences with an important essay on the challenge to the humanist tradition posed in the late 19th century by historical materialism, existentialism and positivism. This is background for the constructive philosophies which sought at the same time to address the general crisis of moral value and provide a positive basis for Jewish existence. Among the thinkers presented in this volume are Moses Hess, Moritz Lazarus, Hermann Cohen (in impressive depth, with a thorough exposition of the Ethics and Religion of Reason), Ahad Ha-Am, I. J. Reines, Simon Dubnow, M. Y. Berdiczewski, the theorists of the Bund, Chaim Zhitlovsky, Nachman Syrkin, and Ber Borochov.
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Francois Soyer

In Antisemitic Conspiracy Theories in the Early Modern Iberian World: Narratives of Fear and Hatred, François Soyer offers the first detailed historical analysis of antisemitic conspiracy theories in Spain, Portugal and their overseas colonies between 1450 and 1750. These conspiracy theories accused Jews and conversos, the descendants of medieval Jewish converts to Christianity, of deadly plots and blamed them for a range of social, religious, military and economic problems. Ultimately, many Iberian antisemitic conspiracy theorists aimed to create a ‘moral panic’ about the converso presence in Iberian society, thereby justifying the legitimacy of ethnic discrimination within the Church and society. Moreover, they were also exploited by some churchmen seeking to impose an idealized sense of communal identity upon the lay faithful.
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Applied Arts in British Exile from 1933

Changing Visual and Material Culture

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Edited by Marian Malet, Rachel Dickson, Sarah MacDougall and Anna Nyburg

Yearbook Volume 19 continues an investigation which began with Arts in Exile in Britain 1933-45 (Volume 6, 2004). Twelve chapters, ten in English and two in German, address and analyse the significant contribution of émigrés across the applied arts, embracing mainstream practices such as photography, architecture, advertising, graphics, printing, textiles and illustration, alongside less well known fields of animation, typography and puppetry. New research adds to narratives surrounding familiar émigré names such as Oskar Kokoschka and Wolf Suschitzky, while revealing previously hidden contributions from lesser known practitioners. Overall, the volume provides a valuable addition to the understanding of the applied arts in Britain from the 1930s onwards, particularly highlighting difficulties faced by refugees attempting to continue fractured careers in a new homeland.

Contributors are: Rachel Dickson, Burcu Dogramaci, Deirdre Fernand, Fran Lloyd, David Low, John March, Sarah MacDougall, Anna Nyburg, Pauline Paucker, Ines Schlenker, Wilfried Weinke, and Julia Winckler.
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Michael Schraer

In A Stake in the Ground, Michael Schraer explores the economic functions of real estate amongst the Jews of the medieval crown of Aragon. He challenges the view of medieval Jews as primarily money-lenders and merchants, finding compelling evidence for extensive property trading and investment. Jews are found as landlords to Christian tenants, transferring land in dowries, wills and gifts. Property holdings were often extremely valuable. For some, property was a major part of their asset portfolios. Whilst many property transactions were linked to the credit boom, land also acted as a liquid and tradeable investment asset in its own right. This is a key contribution to the economic history of medieval Iberia and of medieval Jews.
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Edited by Dan Diner

From Europe and America to the Middle East, North Africa and other non-European Jewish settlement areas, the Encyclopedia of Jewish History and Culture covers the recent history of the Jewish people from 1750 through the 1950s. Originally published in German as the Enzyklopädie jüdischer Geschichte und Kultur by J.B. Metzler Verlag (Stuttgart/Weimar) in 2011 the work includes approximately 800 entries that present the state of international research and reveal a complex portrait of Jewish life - illuminated by many maps and illustrations. Central themes convey information on topics such as autonomy, exile, emancipation, literature, liturgy, music, and science of Judaism. The encyclopedia provides knowledge in an overall context and offers academics and other interested readers new insights into Jewish history and culture. The work is an outstanding contribution to the understanding of Judaism and modernity.

The first volume of the English edition will appear in 2017 with subsequent volumes following in due course. The volumes may be purchased individually as they appear or as a set once all 7 are available. Both the German and the English editions will also be available online.
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Edited by Mirjam Zadoff and Noam Zadoff

The articles collected in Scholar and Kabbalist: The Life and Work of Gershom Scholem present diverse biographical aspects and the scholarly oeuvre of arguably the most influential Jewish-Israeli intellectual of the 20th century. Immigrating to Palestine in 1923, Gershom Scholem became one of the founders of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and was the first to establish Jewish Mysticism as a scholarly discipline. The articles collected here reflect the diversity of Scholem’s intellectual scope including his contribution to Jewish Studies as a scholar of Kabbalah, religion and history, as a bibliophile, and an expert librarian of Judaica. Central aspects of Scholem’s impact on Jewish historiography, literature and art in Israel, Europe and the US, are presented to the reader for the first time.
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Memories that Lie a Little

Jewish Experiences during the Argentine Dictatorship

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Emmanuel Kahan

At first glance, this book might appear to be yet another study on anti-Semitism in Argentina, supplementing those portraying this Southern Cone country as a Nazi shelter and perpetrator of anti-Jewish acts. Accounts of the last military dictatorship (1976-1983), which was responsible for the disappearance of thousands of people of Jewish origin, have contributed to this image. Memories that Lie a Little, however, challenges this view, shedding new light on Jewish experiences during the military dictatorship. Based on extensive archival research, it maps the positions of a wide range of Jewish organizations toward the military regime, opening the way for a better understanding of this complex historical period.



If, then, the dictatorship was not actually anti-Semitic in the strictest sense of the term, why is it remembered as such? Historical research is complemented here by a reconstruction of the ways in which the notion of the regime’s anti-Semitism was crafted from early on, and an examination of its uses, as well as the changes that this narrative underwent in the following years.
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Gerrit Bos

This volume is part of a wider project aiming at mapping the technical medical terminology as it features in medieval Hebrew medical works, especially those terms that do not feature in the current dictionaries at all, or insufficiently. In this way the author hopes to facilitate the consultation of these and other medical works and the identification of anonymous medical material. The terminology discussed in this volume has been derived from three primary and seven secondary sources. The primary sources are: (1) Sefer Ṣedat ha-Derakhim – Moses Ibn Tibbon’s translation of Ibn al-Jazzār’s Zād al-musāfir, bks. 1–2; (2) Sefer ha-Shimmush – Shem Tov Ben Isaac’s Hebrew translation of al-Zahrāwī’s Kitāb al-taṣrīf; (3) Sefer ha-Qanun – Nathan ha-Meʾati’s Hebrew translation of the first book of Ibn Sīnā’s K. al-Qānūn.
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A Companion to Medieval Toledo

Reconsidering the Canons

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Edited by Yasmine Beale-Rivaya and Jason Busic

A Companion to Medieval Toledo. Reconsidering the Canons explores the limits of “Convivencia” through new and problematized readings of material familiar to specialists and offers a thoughtful initiation for the non-specialist into the historical, cultural, and religious complexity of the iconic city of Toledo. The volume seeks to understand the history and cultural heritage of the city as a result of fluctuating coexistence. Divided into three themed sections,- the essays consider additional material, new transcriptions, and perspectives that contribute to more nuanced understandings of traditional texts or events. The volume places this cultural history and these new readings into current scholarly debates and invites its readers to do the same.
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The Origins of the Canon of the Hebrew Bible

An Analysis of Josephus and 4 Ezra

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Juan Carlos Ossandón Widow

In The Origins of the Canon of the Hebrew Bible: An Analysis of Josephus and 4 Ezra, Juan Carlos Ossandón Widow examines the thorny question of when, how, and why the collection of twenty-four books that today is known as the Hebrew Bible was formed. He carefully studies the two earliest testimonies in this regard—Josephus’ Against Apion and 4 Ezra—and proposes that, along with the tendency to idealize the past, which leads to consider that divine revelation to Israel has ceased, an important reason to specify a collection of Scriptures at the end of the first century CE consisted in the need to defend the received tradition to counter those that accepted more books.