Perceiving and Controlling Time in Late Medieval and Renaissance Rome
Erinnerungspolitik und historische Kontroversen in der Bundesrepublik 1945-1980. Übersetzt von Charlotte P. Kieslich
Wurden Papst Pius XII. und die katholische Kirche nach 1945 wegen ihres Verhaltens während der Herrschaft der Nationalsozialisten unverhältnismäßig in den Fokus gerückt?
Mark Edward Ruff untersucht die heftigen Kontroversen über das Verhältnis zwischen der katholischen Kirche und dem NS-Regime, die in der Bundesrepublik zwischen 1945 und 1980 ausbrachen – etwa über Rolf Hochhuths Schauspiel „Der Stellvertreter“ von 1963. Er beleuchtet dabei, warum diese kulturellen Gefechte so viel Kraft kosteten, die Schlagzeilen beherrschten, Klagen vor Gericht auslösten und zum Einschreiten von Außenministerien führten. Nach Ruff waren diese Kontroversen über die Beziehung zwischen Kirche und Nationalsozialismus oftmals Stellvertreterkriege um die Positionierung der Kirche in der „modernen“ Welt – in der Politik, internationalen Beziehungen und den Medien. Im Mittelpunkt dieser Auseinandersetzungen standen in den meisten Fällen Konflikte, die durch die gestiegene politische Bedeutung des Katholizismus und die Integration katholischer Bürgerinnen und Bürger in die Mitte der Gesellschaft ausgelöst wurden.
New Perspectives in Systematic Theology in Light of Nineteenth Century Catholic Renewal
In Carlo Passaglia on Church and Virgin, Valfredo Maria Rossi traces the significant contribution that Carlo Passaglia (1812-1887) has made to Catholic theology, paying particular attention to his Trinitarian ecclesiology and Mariology. Though highly neglected due to his troubled life, Passaglia is one of the most brilliant theologians of the nineteenth century. Commonly – and yet erroneously – ascribed to the Neo-Scholastic movement, he anticipates and so emerges as a forerunner of several themes which will be developed during the Second Vatican Council.

In light of Passaglia’s two most relevant theological works ( De Ecclesia Christi and De Immaculato Deiparae semper Virginis Conceptu), Rossi convincingly shows the originality of Passaglia’s theology, based on a patristic ressourcement highlighting its historical salvific and sacramental dimension.
Author: Xander van Eck
The Gouda Windows (1552-1572): Art and Catholic Renewal on the Eve of the Dutch Revolt offers the first complete analysis of the cycle of monumental Renaissance stained-glass windows donated to the Sint Janskerk in Gouda, after a fire gutted it in 1552. Central among the donors were king Philip II of Spain and bishop of Utrecht Joris van Egmond, who worked together to reform the Church. The inventor of the iconographic program, a close associate to the bishop as well as the king, strove to renew Catholic art by taking the words of Jesus as a starting point. Defining Catholic religion based on widely accepted biblical truths, the ensemble shows that the Mother Church can accommodate all true Christians.
Zoutleeuw's Church of Saint Leonard and Religious Material Culture in the Low Countries (c. 1450-1620)
The Matter of Piety provides the first in-depth study of Zoutleeuw’s exceptionally well-preserved pilgrimage church in a comparative perspective, and revaluates religious art and material culture in Netherlandish piety from the late Middle Ages through the crisis of iconoclasm and the Reformation to Catholic restoration. Analyzing the changing functions, outlooks, and meanings of devotional objects – monumental sacrament houses, cult statues and altarpieces, and small votive offerings or relics – Ruben Suykerbuyk revises dominant narratives about Catholic culture and patronage in the Low Countries. Rather than being a paralyzing force, the Reformation incited engaged counterinitiatives, and the vitality of late medieval devotion served as the fertile ground from which the Counter-Reformation organically grew under Protestant impulses.
Author: Matthieu Pignot
In The Catechumenate in Late Antique Africa (4th-6th centuries) Matthieu Pignot explores how individuals became Christian in ancient North Africa. Before baptism, converts first became catechumens and spent a significant time of gradual integration into the community through rituals and teaching. This book provides the first historical study of this process in African sources, from Augustine of Hippo, to canon of councils, anonymous sermons and 6th-century letters. Pignot shows that practices varied more than is generally assumed and that catechumens, because of their liminal position, were a disputed and essential group in the development of Christian communities until the 6th century at least. This book demonstrates that the catechumenate is key to understanding the processes of Christianisation and conversion in the West.
From the early phases of modern missions, Christian missionaries supported many humanitarian activities, mostly framed as subservient to the preaching of Christianity. This anthology contributes to a historically grounded understanding of the complex relationship between Christian missions and the roots of humanitarianism and its contemporary uses in a Middle Eastern context. Contributions focus on ideologies, rhetoric, and practices of missionaries and their apostolates towards humanitarianism, from the mid-19th century Middle East crises, examining different missionaries, their society’s worldview and their networks in various areas of the Middle East. In the early 20th century Christian missions increasingly paid more attention to organisation and bureaucratisation (‘rationalisation’), and media became more important to their work. The volume analyses how non-missionaries took over, to a certain extent, the aims and organisations of the missionaries as to humanitarianism. It seeks to discover and retrace such ‘entangled histories’ for the first time in an integral perspective.

Contributors include: Beth Baron, Philippe Bourmaud, Seija Jalagin, Nazan Maksudyan, Michael Marten, Heleen (L.) Murre-van den Berg, Inger Marie Okkenhaug, Idir Ouahes, Maria Chiara Rioli, Karène Sanchez Summerer, Bertrand Taithe, and Chantal Verdeil
Editor: Krijn Pansters
A Companion to Medieval Rules and Customaries offers an introduction to the rules and customaries of the main religious orders in medieval Europe: Benedictine, Cistercian, Carthusian, Augustinian, Premonstratensian, Templar, Hospitaller, Teutonic, Dominican, Franciscan, and Carmelite. As well as introducing the early history and spirituality of the orders, scholars survey the central topics – organization, doctrine, morality, liturgy, and culture, as documented by these primary sources.

Contributors are: James Clark, Tom Gaens, Jean-François Godet-Calogeras, Holly Grieco, Emilia Jamroziak, Gert Melville, Stephen Molvarec, Carol Neel, Krijn Pansters, Matthew Ponesse, Bert Roest, Kristjan Toomaspoeg, Paul van Geest, Ursula Vones-Liebenstein, and Coralie Zermatten.
In Giles Firmin and the Transatlantic Puritan Tradition, Jonathan Warren Pagán offers an intellectual biography of Giles Firmin (1613/14-1697), who lived in both Old and New England and lived through many of the transitions of international puritanism in the seventeenth century. By contextualizing Firmin in his intellectual milieu, Warren Pagán also offers a unique vantage on the transition of puritanism to Dissent in late Stuart England, surveying changing approaches to ecclesiology, pastoral theology, and the ordo salutis among the godly during the Restoration through Firmin’s writings.
The Latin Church of Jerusalem in the Palestine War and Its Aftermath, 1946–56
The history of Palestine War does not only concern military history. It also involves social, humanitarian and religious history, as in the case of Jerusalem’s Roman Catholic diocese. Tribulationis Tempore offers a complex narrative on this church, commonly portrayed as monolithically aligned with anti-Zionist and anti-Muslim positions during the “long 1948”. Making use of largely unpublished archives in the Middle East, Europe and the United States, including the recently released Pius XII papers, Maria Chiara Rioli depicts a church engaged in multiple and sometimes contradictory pastoral initiatives amid battles, relief missions for Palestinian refugees, theological reflections on Jewish converts to Catholicism, political relations with the Israeli and Jordanian authorities and liturgical responses to this fluid and uncertain scenario.