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Author: Sigrun Haude
At its core, Coping with Life during the Thirty Years’ War (1618–1648) explores how people tried to survive the Thirty Years’ War, on what resources they drew, and how they attempted to make sense of it. A rich tapestry of stories brings to light contemporaries’ trauma as well as women and men’s unrelenting initiatives to stem the war’s negative consequences. Through these close-ups, Sigrun Haude shows that experiences during the Thirty Years’ War were much more diverse and often more perplexing than a straightforward story line of violence and destruction can capture. Life during the Thirty Years’ War was not a homogenous vale of gloom and doom, but a multifaceted story that was often heartbreaking, yet, at times, also uplifting.
Ce volume présente un récit oral par le griot célébré Djèmory Kouyaté de Nyagassola (actuelle Guinée) (décédé en 2019). Il traite de la façon dont on se souvient de l'époque qui relie la fondation de la société mandingue par Soundiata jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Les récits oraux sur cette époque sont rares car ils exigent du narrateur une compréhension avancée de l'histoire régionale et des relations entre les lignées dirigeantes concurrentes.
Le griot célébré, Djèmory Kouyaté (décédé en 2019), a réalisé ce récit à Naréna (Mali actuel), offrant ainsi un aperçu unique des stratégies de narration et des compétences diplomatiques des griots, car le récit de Djèmory peut être comparé à certains de ses enregistrements antérieurs réalisés à Nyagassola (actuelle Guinée), une ville gouvernée par une lignée rivale des Bandjougousi de Naréna. L’Histoire des Bandjougousi est donc une source importante d’historiographie ouest-africaine.

This volume features an oral account by the acclaimed griot Djèmory Kouyaté from Nyagassola (present-day Guinée) (d. 2019). It deals with the way the era that bridges the foundation of their society by Sunjata to their present-day society, called Manding, is remembered. Oral accounts on this era are rare as they demand from the narrator an advanced understanding of regional history and the relationships between competing ruling lineages.
The acclaimed griot Djèmory Kouyaté (d. 2019) performed this account in Naréna (present-day Mali), thus offering a unique insight into griots’ storytelling strategies and diplomatic skills, because Djèmory’s account can be compared with earlier recordings of him made in Nyagassola (present-day Guinée), a town ruled by a rival lineage to the Bandjougousi from Naréna. L’Histoire des Bandjougousi is therefore an important source for West African historiography.
Most medieval historians have explained the ‘civil wars’ in Scandinavia in the 12th and 13th centuries as internal conflicts within a predominantly national and implicitly state-centered politico-constitutional framework. This book argues that the conflicts during this period should be viewed as less disruptive, less internal and less state-centered than in previous research. It does so through six articles comparing the civil wars in Scandinavia with civil wars in Afghanistan and Guinea-Bissau in the last decades, applying theories and perspectives from anthropology and political science. Finally, four articles discuss civil wars in a broader perspective.

Contributors are Ebrahim Afsah, Gerd Althoff, Jenny Benham, John Comaroff, Hans Jacob Orning, Frederik Rosén, Jón Viðar Sigurðsson, Henrik Vigh, Helle Vogt, Stephen D. White, and Øyvind Østerud.
Aragon vs. Castile and the War of the Two Pedros
In Conflict in Fourteenth-Century Iberia, Kagay and Villalon trace the complicated economic military, political, and social background of the relationship of Iberia’s two greatest Christian states of the fourteenth century, Castile and the Crown of Aragon and their rulers, Pedro I (r. 1350-1366/69) and Pere III (r. 1336-1387). Besides chapters discussing the War of the Two Pedros (1356-1366) and the Castilian Civil War (1366-1369), the authors provide extended treatments of the strategical and tactical elements of the conflicts, the parliamentary, diplomatic, and governmental developments that occurred because of the conflicts as well as their social and political aftermaths. This work, along with authors’ earlier book on the battle of Nájera (1367) provides a much-needed review of Iberia’s violent fourteenth century.
Author: Conor Whately
In Procopius on Soldiers and Military Institutions in the Sixth-Century Roman Empire, Conor Whately examines Procopius’ coverage of rank-and-file soldiers in his three works, the Wars, Buildings, and Secret History. By evaluating his accounts alongside other comparative evidence, such as the edicts of Anastasius, legislation from the Codex Justinianus, and various papyri, Whately reveals the limitations to Procopius’ work, especially when it comes to frontier soldiers. However, this study also shows the impact of Procopius’ experiences with institutional matters such as unit structures on his writing, and the particular value he brings to our understanding of recruitment in the sixth century CE.
Die Reihe wird seit 2019 nicht mehr durch uns veröffentlicht.
Wirken, Werk und Wirkung
Carl von Clausewitz ist ein Klassiker der militärischen und politischen Theorie; seine Schriften gehören zur Weltliteratur. Christian Th. Müller erschließt die Fülle seiner Gedankenwelt erstmals systematisch, nah an den Originaltexten – und dennoch allgemeinverständlich für einen breiten Leserkreis. Clausewitz wird zwar gern zitiert, aber wenig gelesen und noch weniger verstanden. Vor allem wurde verkannt, dass seine Theorie nicht als Regelkatalog für „richtige“ Kriegführung, sondern als kritische Betrachtung zur Schulung des Urteilsvermögens entwickelt worden ist. Als solche regt sie noch heute zum eigenständigen Denken an und bietet Hilfestellung bei der geistigen Durchdringung des Phänomens Krieg. Christian Th. Müller gibt einen Überblick zu Leben und Werk von Clausewitz, erörtert dessen Kriegsbegriff und Theorieverständnis. Im Anschluss werden wesentliche Aspekte seiner Theorie wie u.a. „Strategie und Taktik“, „Angriff und Verteidigung“, „Kleiner Krieg und Volkskrieg“ erläutert. Auf diesem Weg soll einerseits die Lektüre seines Hauptwerkes „Vom Kriege“ erleichtert werden und andererseits die daraus hervor gehende Theorie als ein Werkzeug der kritischen Analyse nahegebracht werden.
Fr. Luis Martín García was superior general of the Society of Jesus during one of the most fractious periods in western history, 1892 to his death in 1906. Fortunately for both the church and his order, he was endowed with remarkable gifts of mind and spirit. He was also troubled with personal challenges that he had to face almost entirely on his own. As an aid, he kept a memoir, prodigious in both size and content, to be published posthumously. The memoir appeared in a critical Spanish edition in 1988. David Schultenover herewith provides a condensed English version along with his interpretation that engages the question. Why would a Jesuit superior general leave to posterity such a candid memoir? The subtitle “Showing Up” provides a clue.
Battlefield Emotions in Late Antiquity is a pioneering work, the first to present a comprehensive analysis of fear and motivation on the battlefields of Late Antiquity. By examining military treatises, Łukasz Różycki identifies means of manipulating the morale of soldiers on the same and on opposing sides, showing various examples of military trickery. The book analyzes non-combat properties of equipment, commanders’ speeches, war cries, keeping up appearances, and other methods of affecting the human psyche. The book is written in the spirit of new military history and combines the methodology of a historian, archaeologist, and philologist, and also considers aspects of psychology, particularly related to the functioning of groups and individuals in extreme situations.