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Mining the rich documentary sources housed in Tuscan archives and taking advantage of the breadth and depth of scholarship produced in recent years, the seventeen essays in this Companion to Cosimo I de' Medici provide a fresh and systematic overview of the life and career of the Grand Duke of Tuscany, with special emphasis on Cosimo I's education and intellectual interests, cultural policies, political vision, institutional reforms, diplomatic relations, religious beliefs, military entrepreneurship, and dynastic concerns.

Contributors: Maurizio Arfaioli, Alessio Assonitis, Nicholas Scott Baker, Sheila Barker, Stefano Calonaci, Brendan Dooley, Daniele Edigati, Sheila ffolliott, Catherine Fletcher, Andrea Gáldy, Fernando Loffredo, Piergabriele Mancuso, Jessica Maratsos, Carmen Menchini, Oscar Schiavone, Marcello Simonetta, and Henk Th. van Veen.
Critical Editions of the Translation by Moses Ibn Tibbon and the Translation Ascribed to Rabbi Jacob, with an Introduction and Glossary. Volume One: Books I–II
Author: Ofer Elior
Euclid's Elements is one of the canonical texts that shaped our cultural heritage. It was translated from Greek into Arabic and from Arabic into Hebrew and Latin. There is little agreement about the textual history of the Arabic translations. The present book offers for the first time a critical edition of two Hebrew translations of Books I–II, by Moses Ibn Tibbon and by "Rabbi Jacob". A serious attempt is made to learn from the Hebrew translations also about the history of the Arabic text. The edition of Ibn Tibbon's translation is accompanied by an Arabic text which was probably its source. Rabbi Jacob's translation is compared to the Latin translation ascribed to Adelard of Bath, probably based on the same Arabic tradition.
Recent research has established the continued importance of engagement with the classical tradition to the formation of scholarly, philosophical, theological, and scientific knowledge well into the eighteenth century. The Worlds of Knowledge and the Classical Tradition in the Early Modern Age is the first attempt to adopt a comparative approach to this phenomenon. An international team of scholars explores the differences and similarities – across time and place – in how the study and use of ancient texts and ideas shaped a wide range of fields: nascent classics, sexuality, chronology, metrology, the study of the soul, medicine, the history of Judaeo-Christian interaction, and biblical criticism. By adopting a comparative approach, this volume brings out some of the most important factors in explaining the contours of early modern intellectual life.
The ingenious and ambitious Campani brothers—Matteo, Pier Tommaso, and Giuseppe—were at the core of thriving activity of technological and scientific innovation that involved popes, the Sun King, and other rulers of baroque Europe. Especially Giuseppe’s outstanding production of innovating clocks, telescopes, and microscopes, attracted the attention of the most important scientific characters and experimental academies of the time. This posthumous book by Silvio Bedini is the result of a fifty-year-long study that will serve not just as a reference work for scholars interested in seventeenth-century clockmaking, practical optics, astronomy, and science and technology in general, but it also will provide you with unique insights into the scientific and technological landscape of baroque Rome and its links to a broader European scene. The author's narrative style and the many illustrations which accompany the story, make this book also for non-specialists an enjoyable read.
This book explores the notebooks of S. Belle, an astrologer who lived in late fifteenth-century France, as a case study of late medieval astrological practice. These notebooks combine astrological doctrine, a large collection of horoscopes, an almanac, and three complete judgements of nativities. By studying Belle’s methods, processes of learning, and practices, this book contributes to a better understanding of the internal architecture of astrology in the pre-modern world; this includes its techniques, methodologies, goals, transmission, and development throughout history. It offers an internalist view of the practice of astrology, as a counterpart to the existing research into astrology’s social and cultural impact.
Editor: Aurora Panzica
Nicole Oresme was one of the most original and influential thinkers of the fourteenth century. He is best known for his mathematical discoveries, his economic theories, as well as his vernacular translations of cosmological and ethical texts that were undertaken at the request of King Charles V. This volume sheds light on the beginning of Oresme's scientific activity at the University of Paris (ca. 1340 – ca. 1350), a period of his intellectual career about which little is known. Over the course of this decade, Oresme lectured on many Aristotelian texts on natural philosophy, such as the Physics, On the Heavens, On generation and corruption, Meteorology, and On the Soul. Oresme's commentaries on Aristotle's Meteorology count among his only unpublished texts. This volume presents the first critical edition of books I-II.10 of the second redaction of Oresme's Questions on Meteorology. The edition is preceded by a historical and philological introduction that discusses the context of Oresme’s scientific career and examines the manuscript tradition.