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This book focuses on trend-setting judgements in different parts of the world that impacted on the rights of individuals belonging to minorities and indigenous people. The cases illustrate how the judiciary has been called upon to fill out the detail of minority protection arrangements and how, in doing so, in many instances the judiciary has taken the respective countries on a course that parliament may not have been able to navigate. In this book authors from various nationalities and backgrounds in the practical application of minority protection arrangements investigate the role of the judiciary in constitutional arrangements aimed at the protection of the rights of minorities and indigenous peoples.
This volume conducts an in-depth analysis of the ECtHR’s case law in the area of migration and asylum as regards the most relevant rights of the ECHR, exploring the role of this court in this area of law. Each chapter deals with the case law on one specific ECHR article. In addition, the volume is enriched by two additional studies which deal with issues that are treated in a transversal manner, namely vulnerability and the margin of appreciation. The volume systematises the case law on aliens’ rights under the ECHR, offering readers the chance to familiarise themselves with or gain deeper insight into the main principles the Strasbourg court applies in its case law regarding aliens.
This volume of Annotated Legal Documents on Islam in Europe covers Spain and consists of an annotated collection of legal documents affecting the status of Islam and Muslims. The legal texts are published in the original Spanish language while the annotations and supporting material are in English. By legal documents are meant the texts of legislation, including relevant secondary legislation, as well as significant court decisions. Each legal text is preceded by an introduction describing the historical, political and legal circumstances of its adoption, plus a short paragraph summarising its content. The focus of the collection is on the religious dimensions of being Muslim in Europe, i.e. on individuals' access to practise their religious obligations and on the ability to organise and manifest their religious life.
Author: Mona Samadi
Mona Samadi examines the sources of gender differences within the Islamic legal tradition and describes how Islamic law entitles individuals to justice according to their status, abilities and potential. In the case of men and women's capabilities, the underlying principle is that they are entitled to the same rights, as long as their capabilities are the same. In the legal construction of women's status, women have been prescribed lacking the same abilities and capabilities as men. As such, their status and rights differ, justifying men to be the maintainers of women.

By presenting the historical development of women's status and how women's legal status is debated in contemporary Muslim societies, Mona Samadi convincingly provides various methods for facilitating change within the Islamic legal theory framework.
Author: Vedna Jivan
This volume in the Brill Research Perspectives in Comparative Discrimination Law compares sex discrimination protection through three thematic lenses. Firstly, it charts and compares the evolution sex discrimination protection in human rights law in three treaty-bodies - the CEDAW Committee, the HRC and the CESCR. Second, it traces the development of sex discrimination protection in three domestic law frameworks – the United States, Australia and India. Finally, it compares the development of sex discrimination protection in international law with its development in the domestic laws of the three countries and analyses the implications of that comparison. Despite differences in the translation of international approaches to sex discrimination into domestic law and differences in social, political and cultural contexts, women appear to face similar limitations in accessing justice through sex discrimination frameworks.
Volume Editors: Terressa A. Benz and Graham Cassano
This volume places the Flint, Michigan, water contamination disaster in the context of a broader crisis of neoliberal governance in the United States. Authors from a range of disciplines (including sociology, criminal justice, anthropology, history, communications, and jurisprudence) examine the failures in Flint, but with an emphasis upon comparison, calling attention to similar trajectories for cities like Detroit and Pontiac, in Michigan, and Stockton, in California. While the studies collected here emphasize policy failures, class conflict, and racial oppression, they also attend to the resistance undertaken by Flint residents, Michiganders, and U.S. activists, as they fought for environmental and social justice.

Contributors include: Terressa A. Benz, Jon Carroll, Graham Cassano, Daniel J. Clark, Katrinell M. Davis, Michael Doan, David Fasenfest, A.E. Garrison, Peter J. Hammer, Ami Harbin, Shea Howell, Jacob Lederman, Raoul S. Lievanos, Benjamin J. Pauli, and Julie Sze.
The European Yearbook of Minority Issues provides a critical and timely review of contemporary developments in minority-majority relations in Europe. It combines analysis, commentary and documentation in relation to conflict management, international legal developments and domestic legislation affecting minorities in Europe.
Part I contains scholarly articles and, in the 2019 volume, it centres on religious issues that have come before courts of law.
Part II contains reports on national and international developments.
Part III features book reviews introducing and critiquing new, relevant literature within the disciplines of the social sciences, humanities and law.

Apart from providing a unique annual overview of minority issues for both scholars and practitioners in this field, the Yearbook is an indispensable reference tool for libraries, research institutes as well as governments and international organisations.

The European Yearbook of Minority Issues is also available online.
This book examines different approaches by which states characterised by federal or decentralized arrangements reconcile equality and autonomy. In case studies from four continents, leading experts analyse the challenges of ensuring institutional, social and economic equality whilst respecting the competences of regions and the rights of groups.
This volume of Annotated Legal Documents on Islam in Europe covers the Czech Republic and consists of an annotated collection of legal documents affecting the status of Islam and Muslims. The legal texts are published in the original Czech language while the annotations and supporting material are in English. By legal documents are meant the texts of legislation, including relevant secondary legislation, as well as significant court decisions. Each legal text is preceded by an introduction describing the historical, political and legal circumstances of its adoption, plus a short paragraph summarising its content. The focus of the collection is on the religious dimensions of being Muslim in Europe, i.e. on individuals' access to practise their religious obligations and on the ability to organise and manifest their religious life.
The series A Commentary on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, provides an article by article analysis of all substantive, organizational and procedural provisions of the CRC and its two Optional Protocols. Each volume in the series covers an article of the CRC. For every article, a comparison with related human rights provisions is made, followed by an in-depth exploration of the nature and scope of State obligations deriving from that article. Volumes are authored by experts in the topic under review. The series constitutes an essential tool for actors in the field of children’s rights, including academics, students, judges, grassroots workers, governmental, non-governmental and international officers. It was originally sponsored by the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office and is currently edited by the Child Law Department of the University of Leiden Law School.

Format
The Commentary is published as a part-work, and when completed, aims to offer the subscriber the most comprehensive, in-depth and practical reference work currently available on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.
Each chapter is produced as a separate fascicle consisting of (on average) 40 pages, and follows a clear and standard layout; fascicles are produced in paperback form, and are published and sent to subscribers on a regular basis.