This book is an account of the rise of definite and indefinite articles in Danish, Swedish and Icelandic, as documented in a choice of extant texts from 1200-1550. These three North Germanic languages show different development patterns in the rise of articles, despite the common origin, but each reveals interdependencies between the two processes.
The matter is approached from both a quantitative and a qualitative perspective. The statistical analysis provides an improved overview on article grammaticalization, focusing on the factors at the basis of such process. The in-depth qualitative analysis of longer text passages places the crucial stage of the definite article grammaticalization with the so-called indirect anaphoric reference.
The Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik, founded in 1970, has a rich history of important publications. It was published as a book series until the end of 2015 and it is now published as a print and e-journal.
The journal Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik is an international peer-reviewed journal on Old Germanic languages, such as Gothic, Old Dutch, Old English, Old High German, Old Norse, Old Saxon and Middle Dutch, Middle English and Middle High German.
It includes topics and approaches that range from historical linguistics to literary studies, including onomastics, runology, manuscript studies, textual criticism and philology. Special issues on Old Germanic studies are published on a regular basis.
Contributions in English and German. For other languages, please consult the editors.

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