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‘Alī, son of Abī Ṭālib, Muhammad’s son-in-law and cousin, is the only Companion of the Prophet who has remained to this day the object of fervent devotion of hundreds of millions of followers in the lands of Islam, especially in the East. Based on a detailed analysis of several categories of sources, this book demonstrates that Shi‘ism is the religion of the Imam, of the Master of Wisdom, just like Christianity is that of Christ, and that ‘Alī is the first Master and Imam par excellence. Shi‘ism can therefore be defined, in its most specific religious aspects, as the absolute faith in ‘Alī: the divine Man, the most perfect manifestation of God’s attributes, simultaneously spiritual refuge, model and horizon.

With contributions by Orkhan Mir-Kasimov & Mathieu Terrier

Translated from French by Francisco José Luis & Anthony Gledhill
In A Christian-Muslim Comparative Theology of Saints: The Community of God’s Friends, Hans A. Harmakaputra focuses on a question that emerges from today’s multi-faith context: “Is it possible for Christians to recognize non-Christians as saints?” To answer affirmatively, he offers a Christian perspective on an inclusive theology of saints through the lens of comparative theology that is based on the thought of Catholic, Protestant, and Muslim theologians: Karl Rahner, Jean-Luc Marion, Elizabeth Johnson, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Paul Tillich, and Ibn Arabī’. As a result of this interreligious comparison, three theological constructs emerge: (1) saints as manifestations and revealers of God’s self-communication, (2) the hiddenness of saints, and (3) saints as companions.
These theological constructs redefine and reconfigure Christian understanding of saints on one hand, and on the other hand provide theological reasoning to include non-Christians in the Christian notion of the communion of saints.
الحديث والأخلاق: مقاربة متعدد التخصصات
Volume Editor: Mutaz al-Khatib
This volume addresses the interplay of ḥadīth and ethics and contributes to examining the emerging field of ḥadīth-based ethics. The chapters cover four different sections: noble virtues (makārim al-akhlāq) and virtuous acts (faḍāʾil al-aʿmāl); concepts (adab, taḥbīb, ʿuzla); disciplines (ḥadīth transmission, gender ethics); and individual and key traditions (the ḥadīth of intention, consult your heart, key ḥadīths). The volume concludes with a chronologically ordered annotated bibliography of the key primary sources in the Islamic tradition with relevance to understanding the interplay of ḥadīth and ethics. This volume will be beneficial to researchers in the fields of Islamic ethics, ḥadīth studies, moral philosophy, scriptural ethics, religious ethics, and narrative ethics, in addition to Islamic and religious studies in general.

Contributors
Faqihuddin Abdul Kodir, Nuha Alshaar, Safwan Amir, Khairil Husaini Bin Jamil, Pieter Coppens, Chafik Graiguer, M. Imran Khan, Mutaz al-Khatib, Salahudheen Kozhithodi and Ali Mian.

يتناول هذا الكتاب الصلة بين الحديث والأخلاق، الأمر الذي لم يحظ بالاهتمام في الدراسات المعاصرة حول الأخلاق الإسلامية. فهو يؤسس لفرع أخلاقي جديد اسمه «الأخلاق الحديثية» التي تشكل مع أخلاق القرآن ما يسمى «الأخلاق النصية». يغطي الكتاب جوانب نظرية وأخرى تطبيقية. فهو يبرز المضمون الأخلاقي الثري لمدونات الحديث، ويضم أربعة أقسام رئيسة هي: مكارم الأخلاق، وفضائل الأعمال، ومفاهيم: الأدب والتحبيب والعزلة، كما يتناول الأبعاد الأخلاقية لرواية الحديث والجندر (النوع الاجتماعي)، بالإضافة إلى الأحاديث المفردة (كحديث إنما الأعمال بالنيات، وحديث استفتِ قلبك) والأحاديث الكلية التي تشكل أصول الحديث ومبادئه الكبرى. يحتوي الكتاب أيضًا على كشاف تحليليّ لمصنفات المحدثين في الأخلاق. من شأن هذا الكتاب أن يكون مرجعًا للطلاب والباحثين في المجالات الآتية: الأخلاق الإسلامية، والحديث النبوي، والفلسفة الأخلاقية، والأخلاق النصية، والأخلاق الدينية، وأخلاقيات السرد، بالإضافة إلى الدراسات الإسلامية والدينية بشكل عام.

المساهمون شفيق اكّريكّر، وصفوان أمير، خوَيرئيل حسيني بن جميل، ومحمد عمران خان، ومعتز الخطيب، ونهى الشعار، وفقيه الدين عبد القدير، وپيتر كوپنس، وصلاح الدين كوزهيتهودي، وعلي ألطاف ميان.
This volume presents the reader with a fascinating collection of hymns composed by El‘azar the Babylonian, an Arab-Jewish poet who is active in Baghdad during the first half of the 13th century. His religious oeuvre consists of dozens of hymns, coming down to us from the treasures of the Cairo Genizah and the Firkovicz Collections. His compositions provide a cross-section of genres and liturgical destinations. El‘azar’s devotional hymnology is characterised by a striking spiritual tendency which reveals his familiarity with contemporary Sufism in both Muslim and Jewish circles.
This volume discusses the origin and structure of the universe in mystical Islam (Sufism) and Islam’s civilizational predecessors with special reference to parallel realms of existence and their interaction. Contributors address Sufi ideas about the fate of human beings in this and future life under three rubrics: (1) cosmogony and eschatology (“where do we come from?” and “where do we go?”); (2) conceptualizations of the world of the here-and-now (“where are we now?”); and (3) visualizations of realms of existence, their hierarchy and mutual relationships (“where are we in relation to other times and places?”).

Contributors are Christian Lange, Alexander Knysh, Noah Gardiner, Stephen Hirtenstein, Saeko Yazaki, Jean-Jacques Thibon, Leah Kinberg, Sara Sviri, Munjed M. Murad, Simon O’Meara, Pierre Lory, Mathieu Terrier, Michael Ebstein, Binyamin Abrahamov and Frederick Colby.
Studies on Graphic Representations in Sufi Literature (13th to 16th Century)
Volume Editor: Giovanni Maria Martini
Visualizing Sufism approaches the question of the presence of graphic materials in Islamic mystical literature from a broad and comprehensive perspective. To this goal, an international group of specialists in the field worked on largely manuscript and unpublished sources with the aim of analysing the use of visual elements in the works of some key figures of Islamic mysticism—Ibn al-ʿArabī, Aḥmad al-Būnī, Saʿd al-Dīn Ḥamūyeh, al-Shaʿrānī—, and in intellectual networks—Ḥurūfiyya and Bektashiyya, Shīrīn Maghribī and his connections. The result is the most extensive collection of specimens of Sufi graphic materials ever brought together and discussed in a single volume. By virtue of the object of study investigated in the chapters of this book, in addition to the history of Sufism, questions are raised that touch upon numerous areas in the field of Islamic Studies, including intellectual history, codicology, and art history.

Contributors
Elizabeth Alexandrin, Noah Gardiner, Ali Karjoo-Ravary, Evyn Kropf, Giovanni Maria Martini, Orkhan Mir-Kasimov, and Sophie Tyser.
Author: Jari Kaukua
In Suhrawardī’s Illuminationism, Jari Kaukua offers a new interpretation of Shihāb al-Dīn al-Suhrawardī’s (d. 1191 CE) illuminationist (ishrāqī) philosophy. Commonly portrayed as a philosophically inclined mystic, Suhrawardī appears here as a perspicacious critic of Avicenna who developed his critique into an alternative philosophical system.
Focusing on metaphysics and theory of science, Kaukua argues that Suhrawardī’s illuminationist philosophy combines rigorous metaphysical monism with a modest but positive assessment of scientific explanation. This philosophical core of Suhrawardī’s illuminationism is reconcilable with but independent of the mystical side of the shaykh al-ishrāq.
This book discusses hagiographical sources from Morocco taking in consideration the often-overlooked oral tradition. Orality, as is shown in this study, completes and enriches the vision of hagiography that written sources traditionally has offered. The most relevant example in this book is the high presence of female saints in oral narratives that were not included in any other written sources. Recovering oral tradition to study hagiography as well as the role of female saints in Morocco has been one of the main areas of focus in this study as well as problematizing the dependence and dialogue between written and oral culture and can help to understand the diffusion and presence of similar phenomena in other areas of Morocco.
Author: Tahera Aftab
In Sufi Women of South Asia. Veiled Friends of God, the first biographical compendium of hundred and forty-one women, from the eleventh to the twentieth century, Tahera Aftab fills a serious gap in the existing scholarship regarding the historical presence of women in Islam and brings women to the centre of the expanding literature on Sufism. The book’s translated excerpts from the original Farsi and Urdu sources that were never put together create a much-needed English-language source base on Sufism and Muslim women. The book questions the spurious religious and cultural traditions that patronise gender inequalities in Muslim societies and convincingly proves that these pious women were exemplars of Islamic piety who as true spiritual masters avoided its public display.