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Volume Editors: David Thomas and John A. Chesworth
Christian-Muslim Relations, a Bibliographical History 18 (CMR 18), covering the Ottoman Empire in the period 1800-1914, is a further volume in a general history of relations between the two faiths from the 7th century to the early 20th century. It comprises a series of introductory essays and the main body of detailed entries. These treat all the works, surviving or lost, that have been recorded. They provide biographical details of the authors, descriptions and assessments of the works themselves, and complete accounts of manuscripts, editions, translations and studies. The result of collaboration between numerous new and leading scholars, CMR 18, along with the other volumes in this series, is intended as a fundamental tool for research in Christian-Muslim relations.

Section editors: Clinton Bennett, Luis F. Bernabé Pons, Jaco Beyers, Emanuele Colombo, Lejla Demiri, Martha Frederiks, David D. Grafton, Stanisław Grodź, Alan Guenther, Vincenzo Lavenia, Arely Medina, Diego Melo Carrasco, Alain Messaoudi, Gordon Nickel, Claire Norton, Reza Pourjavady, Douglas Pratt, Radu Păun, Charles Ramsey, Peter Riddell, Umar Ryad, Cornelia Soldat, Karel Steenbrink, Charles Tieszen, Carsten Walbiner, Catherina Wenzel.
This multi-disciplinary volume shows Istanbul, capital of the vast polyglot, multiethnic, and multireligious Ottoman empire and home to one of the world’s largest and most diverse urban populations, as an early modern metropolis. It is the first collective effort to reflect the wealth of recent scholarship on early modern Istanbul , embracing novel subjects and questions, and fresh approaches to older debates.

Assembling topics seldom treated together, and crisscrossing the socioeconomic, political, cultural, environmental, and spatial, it examines the myriad human and non-human actors, local and global, that shaped the city into one of the key sites of early modern urbanity.

Contributors are: Oscar Aguirre-Mandujano , Zeynep Altok, Walter G. Andrews, Betül Başaran, Cem Behar, Maurits H. van den Boogert, John J. Curry, Linda T. Darling, Suraiya Faroqhi, Emine Fetvacı, Shirine Hamadeh, Cemal Kafadar, Çiğdem Kafescioğlu, Deniz Karakaş, Leyla Kayhan Elbirlik, B. Harun Küçük, Selim S. Kuru, Karen A. Leal, Gülru Necipoğlu, Christoph K. Neumann, Aslı Niyazioğlu, Amanda Phillips, Marinos Sariyannis, Aleksandar Shopov, Lucienne Thys-Şenocak, Nükhet Varlık, N. Zeynep Yelçe, Gülay Yılmaz, and Zeynep Yürekli.
In Gender and Biopolitics: The Changing Patterns of Womanhood in Post-2002 Turkey, Pınar Sarıgöl sheds new light on the life spheres of the woman as a means of uncovering neoliberal Islamic thinking with regard to individuals and the population. The tenets and merits of Islamic neoliberalism bring moral and religious practices into the discussion regarding ‘how’ the social order should be in general, and ‘how’ the ideal woman should be in particular. Islam and neoliberalism are well matched here because Islam takes society as a social body in which hierarchies and roles are divinely normalised. This book uniquely brings this point to the fore and draws attention to the interplay between the rational and moral values constituting Islamic neoliberal female subjects.
Editors: Ebru Boyar and Kate Fleet
Centred on the socio-economic life of Ottoman Anatolia, this volume examines aspects of production, local and international trade, consumption and the role of the state, both at a local and a central level. Based on a wide array of data and adopting a variety of approaches, chapters range from the macro to the micro, from the overview of Anatolian economic resources to the in-depth examination of the petition language of provincial economic actors. Making a Living in Ottoman Anatolia thus offers the reader an entrée into the rich and varied socio-economic life of a central region of the Ottoman empire.

Contributors are Marc Aymes, Ebru Boyar, Metin Coşgel, Suraiya Faroqhi, Kate Fleet, Elena Frangakis-Syrett, Yonca Köksal, Mehmet Öz, Mehmet Polatel and Sadullah Yıldırım.
Cihānnümā is the summa of Ottoman geography and one of the axial texts of Islamic intellectual history. Kātib Çelebi (d. 1657) sought to combine the Islamic geographical tradition with the new European discoveries, atlases and surveys. His cosmography included a comprehensive description of the regions of the world, extending westward from Japan and as far as the eastern Ottoman provinces. Ebū Bekr b. Behrām ed-Dimaşḳī (d. 1691) continued with a survey of the Arab countries and the remaining Ottoman provinces of Anatolia. İbrāhīm Müteferriḳa combined the two, with additional notes and maps of his own, in one of the earliest Ottoman printed books, Kitāb-ı Cihānnümā (1732).
Our translation includes the entire text of Müteferriḳa’s edition, distinguishing clearly between the contributions of the three authors. Based on Kātib Çelebi’s original manuscript we have made hundreds of corrections to Müteferriḳa’s text. Additional corrections are based on comparison with Kātib Çelebi’s Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Latin and Italian sources.
Volume Editors: Seyfi Kenan and Selçuk Aksin Somel
Eighteen expert researchers have come together to provide original articles and new perspectives on transformation throughout Ottoman history, in order to honor the life’s work of Metin Kunt.
Kunt’s work revolutionized our understanding of change in Ottoman political, social and cultural history in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. This new collection focuses on the contributions of key players in these fields and includes chapters on Ottoman artisans in a changing political context, Ottoman chief scribes and the rhetorics of political survival in the 17th century, and empiricism in the Ottoman Empire.

Contributors are Antonis Anastasopoulos, Iris Agmon, Tülay Artan, Karl K. Barbir, Fatih Bayram, Suraiya Faroqhi, Cornell H. Fleischer, Pál Fodor, Mehmet Kalpaklı, Cemil Koçak, B. Harun Küçük, Aslı Niyazioğlu, Mehmet Öz, Kaya Şahin, Derin Terzioğlu, Ekin Tuşalp-Atiyas, Christine Woodhead, N. Zeynep Yelçe, Elizabeth A. Zachariadou.
A Historical Study in Organizational Dimensions of Islamic Mysticism
Ṭuruq and ṭuruq-linked institutions by Frederick De Jong was first published in 1978. It is largely based on research in public and private archives in Cairo, and on published materials in limited circulation. This study became highly influential in its field. De Jong describes the development of the administration and organization of the ṭuruq and ṭuruq-linked institutions ( takāyā, zawāyā, and shrines) under the shaykhs of the Bakrī family in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Egypt. Central to this administration is the principle of right of qadam, meaning the exclusive right of a ṭarīqa to proselytize and to appear in public in a particular area, if it could be proved that it had been the first to do so.
Author: Nadja Danilenko
In Picturing the Islamicate World, Nadja Danilenko explores the message of the first preserved maps from the Islamicate world. Safeguarded in al-Iṣṭakhrī’s Book of Routes and Realms (10th century C.E.), the world map and twenty regional maps complement the text to a reference book of the territories under Muslim rule. Rather than shaping the Islamicate world according to political or religious concerns, al-Iṣṭakhrī chose a timeless design intended to outlast upheavals. Considering the treatise was transmitted for almost a millennium, al-Iṣṭakhrī’s strategy seems to have paid off. By investigating the Persian and Ottoman translations and all extant manuscripts, Nadja Danilenko unravels the manuscript tradition of al-Iṣṭakhrī’s work, revealing who took an interest in it and why.
Festivity and Representation in the Early Eighteenth Century
The 1720 Imperial Circumcision Celebrations in Istanbul offers the first holistic examination of an Ottoman public festival through an in-depth inquiry into different components of the 1720 event. Through a critical and combined analysis of the hitherto unknown archival sources along with the textual and pictorial narratives on the topic, the book vividly illustrates the festival’s organizational details and preparations, its complex rites (related to consumption, exchange, competition), and its representation in court-commissioned illustrated festival books (sūrnāmes).
To analyze all these phases in a holistic manner, the book employs an interdisciplinary approach by using the methodological tools of history, art history, and performance studies and thus, provides a new methodological and conceptual framework for the study of Ottoman celebrations.