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This volume addresses key ethical issues and challenges of modern urban warfare through ten chapters written by acclaimed experts from eight different countries and three continents. Foreword to the volume was written by Gen. (ret) Mart de Kruif, while Professor Hugo Slim wrote the Introduction.
In addition to providing the reader with the history of the intricate relationship between city and war, authors offer critical insights into the ethical problems arising from various dimensions of modern urban warfare: conflicting war narratives, imperative of victory, tactical and leadership specificities, use of non-lethal measures, international interventions, in bello peculiarities of urban warfare, introduction of new weapons and technologies, use of war games and simulations in training for urban warfare, and many more.
Volume Editors: Stephan Marquardt and Steven Blockmans
The Treaty of Lisbon has significantly enhanced the EU’s institutional framework and the instruments at its disposal in foreign policy and external relations, notably through the creation of the function of the High Representative, supported by the European External Action Service. Contributing to the maintenance of international peace and security is one of the core objectives of the EU’s external action. This volume, with contributions from legal experts on EU foreign policy and external relations, illustrates the manifold legal issues arising in EU external action and in its efforts to achieve this essential objective.
Author: Jeremy Grunert
An Ethnomethodological Investigation into the Production and Assessment of Legal Targeting
The book provides an empirical account of the laws that regulate today’s scenes of armed conflict by looking into the details of one particular military incident and its ex-post legal accounting. Empirically, the book focuses on a highly controversial airstrike in Afghanistan (2009), in which large numbers of civilians were identified as combatants and killed as such. The incident lends itself to reflect upon the relation between the violation of procedural rules and the violation of the international laws of armed conflict. The ethnomethodological Law-in-Action research investigates the practical details of legal accountability and explores how the event shaped and specified the legally required protection of civilians in armed conflict. Exploring the collaborative and systematic work that goes into the ‘application of law’ at the military and the judiciary site, the study develops an empirical respecification of the concept of ‘juridification of warfare’.
This book scrutinises the call-out of the military in the domestic domain in a selection of 13 countries. Nation-states vary in their political-legal structures and all have their own history in the use of military personnel in domestic matters. Three recent events have resulted in increased domestic military deployment and have been experienced in most countries. In the security domain, there is the rise of Islamic State and increasing acts of terrorism, resulting in military involvement in policing. The other two have been increased humanitarian needs: the COVID-19 pandemic and the widespread flooding and fires following the changes in climate. These have brought increasing military activity domestically, even in established democracies. This comparative analysis incorporates historical developments and provides a rich multidisciplinary approach from political and social scientists to lawyers and military personnel.
The speed of technological change is demonstrated not least by the new military technologies that are in use or are currently being developed. For example, the use of remote-controlled and semi-autonomous weapons systems has long been standard in the armed forces, and advances in artificial intelligence mean that more "decision-making " can be expected to be transferred to the machines used by the military. But not everything that is technologically possible is ethically justifiable.
This volume, which brings together contributions to an annual conference of the European Chapter of the International Society for Military Ethics, attempts to address the ethical and legal problems posed by emerging military technologies. In a number of exciting essays, internationally renowned researchers present their insights.
Author: Seyfullah Hasar
Examining the legality of foreign military intervention in internal conflicts with the consent of the government, this book gives and analyses a to-the-point account of post-Cold War State practice with more than 45 incidents of such interventions on a scale neglected in current scholarship. Owing to this account, it also manages to engage in peripheral aspects of the subject overlooked in the literature, such as the impact of an ineffective arms embargo on a consensual intervention, or the consequences of the invocation by an intervening State of both consent and its right to self-defence. The book also examines, among others, the issue of the legal legitimacy and recognition of governments, the rules that can considerably constrain the scope of consensual interventions under certain circumstances, and the challenging and under-addressed implications of consensual interventions for the crime of aggression.
The volume investigates to what extent the international and European Union legal frameworks applicable to Chemical, Biological and Radio-Nuclear (CBRN) events are adequate to face current challenges. It is innovative in many aspects: it adopts an all-hazard approach to CBRN risks, focusing on events of intentional, accidental and natural origin; it explores international obligations according to the four phases of the emergency cycle, including prevention, preparedness, response and recovery; and it covers horizontal issues such as protection of human rights, international environmental law, new technologies, the role of private actors, as well as enforcement mechanisms and remedies available to victims. The book thus offers a new way of looking at the applicable rules of international law in this field.
Author: Yurika Ishii
Japan, the geopolitical lynchpin in the East Asian region, has developed a unique maritime security policy and interpretation of the law of the sea. Japanese Maritime Security and the Law of the Sea is the first title to provide a comprehensive and detailed analysis on these themes in English, examines Japan’s domestic laws and its approach to international law. The topics covered include Japan’s claim over its maritime entitlement, policies on the use of force at sea, and the mandates of the Self-Defense Force and the Japan Coast Guard to use coercive measures in maritime zones and airspace, both in peacetime and in times of emergency.
Rwanda Revisited
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Genocide, Civil War, and the Transformation of International Law
Listen to the podcast with Philip Drew and Bruce Oswald

In Rwanda Revisited: Genocide, Civil War, and the Transformation of International Law, the contributing authors seek to recount, explore, and explain the tragedy that was the Rwanda genocide and the nature of the international community’s entanglement with it. Written by people selected for their personalized knowledge of Rwanda, be it as peacekeepers, aid workers, or members of the ICTR, and/or scholarship that has been clearly influenced by the genocide, this book provides a level of insight, detail and first-hand knowledge about the genocide and its aftermath that is clearly unique. Included amongst the writers are a number of scholars whose research and writings on Rwanda, the United Nations, and genocide are internationally recognized.

Contributors are: Major (ret’d) Brent Beardsley, Professor Jean Bou, Professor Jane Boulden, Dr. Emily Crawford, Lieutenant-General the Honourable Romeo Dallaire, Professor Phillip Drew, Professor Mark Drumbl , Professor Jeremy Farrall, Lieutenant-General John Frewen, Dr. Stacey Henderson, Professor Adam Jones, Ambassador Colin Keating, Professor Robert McLaughlin, Linda Melvern, Dr. Melanie O’Brien, Professor Bruce Oswald, Dr. Tamsin Phillipa Paige, Professor David J. Simon, and Professor Andrew Wallis.

This book was previously published as Special Issue of the Journal of International Peacekeeping, Volume 22 (2018), Issue 1-4 (published April 2020); with updated Introduction.