Author: Farabi Fakih
Author: Sin Wen Lau
This translated volume is based on the Chinese publication Green Book of Population and Labor (No. 18). It focuses on the new era of economic growth fueled primarily by innovation and entrepreneurship, and corresponding developments in China’s employment landscape. Chapter one offers an overview of China’s new economy. Chapter two examines emerging trends in both the labor and the job markets. Changes to labor relations under the new economy are discussed in chapter three, followed by two chapters that look closely at the role China’s largest online ride-hailing service provider has played in shaping the workforce and in job creation. The final chapter reports on current policy support for innovative industries, and makes recommendations.
In Korean Nonprofit/Non-Government Sector Research, Sung-Ju Kim and Jin-Kyung Jung review the various aspects of the nonprofit sector in South Korea. The authors discuss the historical progress of the South Korean nonprofit sector; the internal and external environments of the nonprofit sector; its legal aspects and financial resources; collaboration among nonprofit, for-profit, and government agencies; and current challenges for the nonprofit sector in South Korea.
The fifteen studies presented in Confucian Academies in East Asia offer insight into the history and legacy of these unique institutions of knowledge and education. The contributions analyze origins, spread and development of Confucian academies across China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan from multiple perspectives. This edited volume is one of the first attempts to understand Confucian academies as a complex transnational, intellectual, and cultural phenomena that played an essential role in various areas of East Asian education, philosophy, religious practice, local economy, print industry, and even archery. The broad chronological range of essays allows it to demonstrate the role of Confucian academies as highly adaptable and active agents of cultural and intellectual change since the eighth century until today. An indispensable handbook for studies of Confucian culture and institutions since the eighth century until the present.

Contributors are: Chien Iching, Chung Soon-woo, Deng Hongbo, Martin Gehlmann, Vladimír Glomb, Lan Jun, Lee Byoung-Hoon, Eun-Jeung Lee, Thomas H.C. Lee, Margaret Dorothea Mehl, Steven B. Miles, Hoyt Cleveland Tillman, Nguyễn Tuấn-Cường, Linda Walton and Minamizawa Yoshihiko.
Author: Chee-Beng Tan
Based on long-term ethnographic study, this is the first comprehensive work on the Chinese popular religion in Malaysia. It analyses temples and communities in historical and contemporary perspective, the diversity of deities and Chinese speech groups, religious specialists and temple services, the communal significance of the Hungry Ghosts Festival, the relationship between religion and philanthropy as seen through the lens of such Chinese religious organization as shantang (benevolent halls) and Dejiao (Moral Uplifting Societies), as well as the development and transformation of Taoist Religion. Highly informative, this concise book contributes to an understanding of Chinese migration and settlement, political economy and religion, religion and identity politics as well the significance of religion to both individuals and communities.
Editor: SHAO Binhong
Tikim: Essays on Philippine Food and Culture by Doreen G. Fernandez is a groundbreaking work that introduces readers to the wondrous history of Filipino foodways. First published by Anvil in 1994, Tikim explores the local and global nuances of Philippine cuisine through its people, places, feasts, and flavors.

Doreen Gamboa Fernandez (1934–2002) was a cultural historian, professor, author, and columnist. Her food writing educated and inspired generations of chefs and food enthusiasts in the Philippines and throughout the world. This Brill volume honors and preserves Fernandez’s legacy with a reprinting of Tikim, a foreword by chef and educator Aileen Suzara, and an editor’s preface by historian Catherine Ceniza Choy.