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This collection sheds light on diverse forms of collective engagement among young people. Recent developments in youth studies, and the changing global shape of socio-economic conditions for young people, demand new approaches and ideas. Contributors focus on novel processes, practices and routines within youth collectivity in various contexts across the globe, including Indonesia, Spain, Italy, Norway and Poland. The chapters pay particular attention to transitional phases in the lives of young people. Conceptually, the book also explores the strengths and limitations of a focus on collectivity in youth studies. Ultimately, the book makes the case for a focus on forms of collectivity and engagement to help scholars think through contemporary experiences of shared social life among young people.

Contributors are: Duncan Adam, Massimiliano Andretta, Roberta Bracciale, David Cairns, Diego Carbajo Padilla, Enzo Colombo, Valentina Cuzzocrea, Carles Feixa, Ben Gook, Izabela Grabowska, Natalia Juchniewicz, Ewa Krzaklewska, Wolfgang Lehmann, Michelle Mansfield, María Martinez, Ann Nilsen, Rebecca Raby, Paola Rebughini, Birgit Reißig, Bjørn Schiermer, Tabea Schlimbach, Melanie Simms, Benjamín Tejerina, Kristoffer C Vogt, and Natalia Waechter.
A Report on Young People’s Attitudes to Totalitarianism
In Totalitarianism in the Postmodern Age Piotr Mazurkiewicz et al. seek to answer the question whether a possible spread of pre-totalitarian attitudes among youth may in the near future pose a threat to the contemporary liberal democratic societies. The authors offer a new approach to the study of totalitarian trends in European societies significantly different from the previous one exploring mainly the historical and institutional-procedural aspects. The book not only offers interesting conclusions drawn from empirical research but also proposes an intellectually attractive theoretical model of understanding totalitarianism that can be used for further research.
The impulse for this reflection was the research work performed by the authors on a cohort of contemporary youths from seven countries of Central and Eastern Europe.
Video Games in the Moral and Political Socialization of Children and Young People
Author: Judit Vari
The main gaol of this book is to discuss the place and role of video games in contemporary societies and their impact on individual relationships. It analyses how the development of video games is a sign of and a factor in the democratization of modern societies. Judit Vari explores how video games contribute to the moral and political socialization of children and teenagers.

The book is structured into two parts. The first explores the methodological, ethical and epistemological implications of Games Studies, and shows how the development of an independent field of research on video games can be analyzed as a sign of democratization. The second part focuses on youth identity experimentations and how video games can contribute to the democratization of social relations. She discusses play inequalities, but also how video games are reconfiguring family and peer relationships, thereby influencing the movement of democratization of societies.
The concepts of 'youth' and the 'postcolonial' both inhabit a liminal locus where new ways of being in the world are rehearsed and struggle for recognition against the impositions of dominant power structures. Departing from this premise, the present volume focuses on the experience of postcolonial youngsters in contemporary Britain as rendered in fiction, thus envisioning the postcolonial as a site of fruitful and potentially transformative friction between different identitary variables or sociocultural interpellations. In so doing, this volume provides varied evidence of the ability of literature—and of the short story genre, in particular—to represent and swiftly respond to a rapidly changing world as well as to the new socio-cultural realities and conflicts affecting our current global order and the generations to come.

Contributors are: Isabel M. Andrés-Cuevas, Isabel Carrera-Suárez, Claire Chambers, Blanka Grzegorczyk, Bettina Jansen, Indrani Karmakar, Carmen Lara-Rallo, Laura María Lojo-Rodríguez, Noemí Pereira-Ares, Gérald Préher, Susanne Reichl, Carla Rodríguez-González, Jorge Sacido-Romero, Karima Thomas and Laura Torres-Zúñiga.
In China, strong economic growth over the past four decades, accelerated urbanisation and multiple inequalities between urban and rural worlds have driven the escalation of internal and international migrations. The internal migration of workers represents a unique phenomenon since the reform and opening of China. Less-qualified young migrants are living in subaltern conditions and young migrant graduates have strongly internalised the idea of being the "heroes" of the new Chinese society in a context of emotional capitalism. But internal and international migrations intersect and intertwine, young internal and international migrants from China produce economic cosmopolitanisms in Chinese society and through top-down, bottom-up and intermediary globalisation. The young Chinese migrant incarnates the Global Individual, what we labeled here as the Compressed Individual.
30 Years of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child in Action towards Sustainability
This book investigates and uncover paradoxes and ambivalences that are actualised when seeking to make the right choices in the best interests of the child. The 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child established a milestone for the 20th century. Many of these ideas still stand, but time calls for new reflections, empirical descriptions and knowledge as provided in this book.

Special attention is directed to the conceptualisation of children and childhood cultures, the missing voices of infants and fragile children, as well as transformations during times of globalisation and change. All chapters contribute to understand and discuss aspects of societal demands and cultural conditions for modern-day children age 0–18, accompanied by pointers to their future.

Contributors are: Eli Kristin Aadland, Wenche Bjorbækmo, Jorunn Spord Borgen, Gunn Helene Engelsrud, Kristin Vindhol Evensen, Eldbjørg Fossgard, Liv Torunn Grindheim, Asle Holthe, Liisa Karlsson, Stinne Gunder Strøm Krogager, Jonatan Leer, Ida Marie Lyså, Elin Eriksen Ødegaard, Czarecah Tuppil Oropilla, Susanne Højlund Pedersen, Anja Maria Pesch, Karen Klitgaard Povlsen, Gro Rugseth, Pauline von Bonsdorff, Hege Wergedahl and Susanne C. Ylönen.
Can one speak dispassionately today about Pierre Bourdieu? The extraordinary success of his work and its agonistic dimension makes things quite difficult. Jean-Louis Fabiani’s book is an attempt to apply Bourdieu’s analytical tools to his own work as he invited us in his reflexive sociology. Testing their limitations and their potential ambiguity allows the author to shed new light on the social genesis of his main concepts (field, habitus and capital) and on the complex relationship between science and politics. While the sociologist’s systemic ambition is never taken for granted, it remains possible to reveal its hidden grandeur.

Professor Jean-Louis Fabiani is the winner of the 2020 CEU Award for Outstanding Research
[Click here to read the interview with Professor Jean-Louis Fabiani on the occasion of receiving the award]
Author: Sylvie Octobre
Fake, mods, gaming, remix... these terms refer to modes of access, linked to digital convergence, but above all to capacities for action on cultural content, as well as on creative capacities, made possible thanks to ICTs. The media cultures of the audiovisual era are thus succeeded by the techno cultures of the digital era, in which the smartphone is becoming the first cultural terminal. These changes have a profound influence on the ways in which young people build their lives, but also on social ties. What do fansubbing and media activism have in common? What education do these changes require? These are some of the questions Youth Technoculture: From Aesthetics to Politics tries to answer.
Volume Editors: Olivier Galland and Anne Muxel
Translator: Peter Hamilton
France experienced an unprecedented wave of terrorist attacks in 2015. Following these tragic events, social science researchers felt the need to undertake new work to better understand the dynamics of this new radicalism. This book is the result of one of these attempts. A large quantitative and qualitative survey was conducted among French Lycée students in order to gather substantive information and propose an interpretation of the penetration of radical ideas, be they religious or political, among them.

How widespread are these radical ideas? What are the main characteristics of youngsters who share them? Are there links between religious radicalism and political radicalism? How do young people feel about the 2015 terrorist attacks? How do young people use media and social media to keep abreast of and understand radical acts and opinions? Those are the main questions explored in this book.

Contributors are: Vincenzo Cicchelli, Alexandra Frénod, Olivier Galland, Laurent Lardeux, Anne Muxel, Jean-François Mignot and Sylvie Octobre.
Automatization and systematic exclusion are beyond common sense within U.S. public schools. The failure to address social problems spills over to schools where youth who refuse to conform to the broken system are labelled as deviant and legitimately excluded. Students who conform are made real by the system and allowed back into society to keep manufacturing the same inequalities. This is the Pinocchio Effect. It involves the legitimization of hegemonic knowledge and the oppression of bodies, mind, and spiritualities. The book analyzes the impact of colonialities within U.S. public education by examining the learning experiences that influence teachers’ and students’ spiritualties, affecting the construction and oppression of their identities. Consequently, the author examines how educators can decolonize the classroom, which functions as a political arena as well as a critical space of praxis in order to reveal how realities and knowledges are made nonexistent—an epistemic blindness and privilege.