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Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara in 2021
The Africa Yearbook covers major domestic political developments, the foreign policy and socio-economic trends in sub-Sahara Africa – all related to developments in one calendar year. The Yearbook contains articles on all sub-Saharan states, each of the four sub-regions (West, Central, Eastern, Southern Africa) focusing on major cross-border developments and sub-regional organizations as well as one article on continental developments and one on African-European relations. While the articles have thorough academic quality, the Yearbook is mainly oriented to the requirements of a large range of target groups: students, politicians, diplomats, administrators, journalists, teachers, practitioners in the field of development aid as well as business people.
Critical Reflections on Oil Politics, Resource Economies and Extractive Communities
Volume Editors: Jannik Schritt and Annika Witte
Following a wave of oil discoveries in Africa, Oil-Age Africa offers new perspectives and critical reflections on the prevalent academic discourses on oil in Africa. This collection brings together researchers from the social sciences to challenge simplified readings of the complex realities of oil politics, economies and societies through theoretical critique and ‘on the ground’ ethnographic methods.

Climate change highlights the need to understand the intricate ways societies are built on and for oil energy. Oil-Age Africa analyses the effects of oil production and the global energy structure, offering relevant insights and avenues for future research on oil.

Contributors
Helmut Asche, Joseph N. Mangarella, Immo Eulenberger, Harouna Abdoutan, Monica Skaten, Yorbana Seign-Goura, Laura Smith, James Van Alstine, Geertrui Vannoppen, Mahamidou Aboubacar Attahirou, Salissou Oubandoma, Jannik Schritt.
Volume Editor: Ulf Engel
This is the second edition of the Yearbook on the African Union (YBAU). The YBAU is first and foremost an academic project that provides an in-depth evaluation and analysis of the institution, its processes, and its engagements. Despite the increased agency in recent years of the African Union in general, and the AU Commission in particular, little is known – outside expert policy or niche academic circles – about the Union’s activities. This is the gap the Yearbook on the African Union wants to systematically address. It seeks to be a reference point for in-depth research, evidence-based policy-making and decision-making.

Contributors are Kwesi Aning, Emmanuel Balogun, Habibu Yaya Bappah, Enrico Behne, Bruce Byiers, Annie Barbara Hazviyemurwi Chikwanha, Dawit Yohannes Wondemagegnehu, Katharina P.W. Döring, Jens Herpolsheimer, Hans Hoebeke, Christopher Changwe Nshimbi, Edefe Ojomo, Awino Okech, Onesphore Sematumba, Tim Zajontz.
Race and Racism in Post-apartheid South Africa
Paradise Lost. Race and Racism in Post-apartheid South Africa is about the continuing salience of race and persistence of racism in post-apartheid South Africa. The chapters in the volume illustrate the multiple ways in which race and racism are manifested and propose various strategies to confront racial inequality, racism and the power structure that underpins it, while exploring, how, through a renewed commitment to a non-racial society, apartheid racial categories can be put under erasure at exactly the time they are being reinforced.
Résultat d'un long travail de terrain, ce livre analyse les processus d’émergence du mouvement amazigh au Maroc et les dynamiques protestataires qui ont accompagné son évolution, des années 1960 à nos jours. En plaçant au centre de l'étude les transformations du phénomène protestataire au Maroc, il apporte un éclairage à la fois fascinant et inédit sur la question amazighe, ses causes, ses acteurs et ses formes, puis sur les enjeux identitaires portés par le mouvement amazigh dans la redéfinition de l'État-nation au Maroc.

This book, which represents the fruit of an extended field research, analyses the birth process of the Amazigh movement in Morocco and explores the dynamics of protests that have accompanied its growth from the 1960’s until today. Centred around the transformation of protests over time, this book introduces fresh and fascinating insights into the Amazigh question, its causes, its actors and the various shapes it has taken over the years, and sheds new light on the compelling identity issues that were raised by the Amazigh movement throughout Morocco’s redefinition of the Nation-State model.
International Intervention and the Formation of a Fragmented State
Author: Sara de Simone
How did South Sudan become one of the most striking examples of state-building failure and state collapse after years of international support? What went wrong in the state-building enterprise? How did external intervention overlap and intertwine with local processes of accumulation of power and of state formation? This book addresses these questions analysing the intersection between international and local actors and processes. Based on original ethnographic and archival data, it provides a unique account of how state-building resources were captured and manipulated by local actors at various levels, contributing to the deepening of ethnic fragmentation and the politicization of ethnicity.
Co-constructing NGO Presence in Rural Malawi
Author: Thomas McNamara
In rural Northern Malawi, villagers co-construct meanings for NGOs’ projects and resources. NGOs and their staff are invoked within, yet simultaneously influence, intra-community debates. This book explores NGO presence through detailing relationships, personhoods and social changes within a rural community. It argues that NGOs’ projects have less impact on many Malawians’ lives than the ways their presence encourages villagers to re-image development and renegotiate intra-community obligations and entitlements. The book examines moral economies and discourses of development by detailing how development narratives are built around the symbols development actors emit. It also investigates the intra-village social lives of development brokers.
Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara in 2020
The Africa Yearbook covers major domestic political developments, the foreign policy and socio-economic trends in sub-Sahara Africa – all related to developments in one calendar year. The Yearbook contains articles on all sub-Saharan states, each of the four sub-regions (West, Central, Eastern, Southern Africa) focusing on major cross-border developments and sub-regional organizations as well as one article on continental developments and one on African-European relations. While the articles have thorough academic quality, the Yearbook is mainly oriented to the requirements of a large range of target groups: students, politicians, diplomats, administrators, journalists, teachers, practitioners in the field of development aid as well as business people.
The neoliberal policy response to the crisis in Ghana did not succeed in reversing the economic decline in both the medium and long term. In fact, quite the opposite, rather than undoing the economic decline, Frimpong argues that the policy prescriptions further weakened the country’s ability to develop. This is because the policies intentionally and unintentionally encouraged factors that destabilised the possibility of the real productive assets to earn commensurate returns to facilitate the flow of capital to the real sectors to ensure the survival of industrial enterprises. Rising profit in the financial sector incentivised financial capitalist to divert capital into financial assets at the expense of productive investment, further decelerating the pace of real capital accumulation in the country.
Volume Editor: Ulf Engel
This is the first edition of the Yearbook on the African Union. It is first and foremost an academic project that will provide an in-depth evaluation and analysis of the institution, its processes, and its engagements. Despite the increased agency in recent years of the African Union in general, and the AU Commission in particular, little is known – outside expert policy or niche academic circles – about the Union’s activities. This is the gap the Yearbook on the African Union wants to systematically bridge. It seeks to be a reference point for in-depth research, evidence-based policy-making and decision-making.

Contributors are: Adekeye Adebajo, Habibu Yaya Bappah, Bruce Byiers, Annie Barbara Hazviyemurwi Chikwanha, Dawit Yohannes Wondemagegnehu, Katharina P.W. Döring, Jens Herpolsheimer, Jacob Lisakafu, Frank Mattheis, Henning Melber, Alphonse Muleefu, John N. Nkengasong, Edefe Ojomo, Awino Okech, Jamie Pring, Elizabeth Sidiropoulos, Tim Zajontz.