Morality and Marginality: Towards Sentient Conservation?
Nature conservation in southern Africa has always been characterised by an interplay between Capital, specific understandings of Morality, and forms of Militarism, that are all dependent upon the shared subservience and marginalization of animals and certain groups of people in society. Although the subjectivity of people has been rendered visible in earlier publications on histories of conservation in southern Africa, the subjectivity of animals is hardly ever seriously considered or explicitly dealt with. In this edited volume the subjectivity and sentience of animals is explicitly included. The contributors argue that the shared human and animal marginalisation and agency in nature conservation in southern Africa (and beyond) could and should be further explored under the label of ‘sentient conservation’.

Contributors are Malcolm Draper, Vupenyu Dzingirai, Jan-Bart Gewald, Michael Glover, Paul Hebinck, Tariro Kamuti, Lindiwe Mangwanya, Albert Manhamo, Dhoya Snijders, Marja Spierenburg, Sandra Swart, Harry Wels.
Editor: Jan Bloemendal
In his ‘Project of the New Testament’ Erasmus also wrote a running commentary on all New Testament books, except Revelation, in the form of a paraphrase. In this volume, the Paraphrase on Luke – Latin text with critical apparatus, and English introduction and commentary, is edited. In the paraphrase, Erasmus turns out to be a mature interpreter of the Bible, who advocated a new Christianity, which he called ‘the philosophy of Christ’, and implicitly criticized the clergy of his own age.
The Influence of Technology on the Form of Arabic Type, 1908–1993
Author: Titus Nemeth
Arabic is the third most widely used script in the world, and gave rise to one of the richest manuscript cultures of mankind. Its representation in type has engaged printers, engineers, businesses and designers since the 16th century, and today most digital devices render Arabic type. Yet the evolution of the printed form of Arabic, and its development from metal to pixels, has not been charted before. Arabic Type-Making in the Machine Age provides the first comprehensive account of this history using previously undocumented archival sources. In this richly illustrated volume, Titus Nemeth narrates the evolution of Arabic type under the influence of changing technologies from the perspective of a practitioner, combining historical research with applied design considerations.
The problem of the limits of science is twofold. First, there is the problem of demarcation, i.e., the boundaries or “barriers” between what is science and what is not science. Second, there is the problem of the ceiling of scientific activity, which leads to the “confines” of this human enterprise. These two faces of the problem of the limits — the “barriers” and the “confines” of science — require a new analysis, which is the task of this book. The authors take into account the Kantian roots but they are focused on the current stage of the philosophical and methodological analyses of science. This vision looks to supersede the Kantian approach in order to reach a richer conception of science.
Master of the Minuscule
In Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Master of the Minuscule, the Father of Microbiology is presented in the context of his time, relationships and the Dutch Golden Age. Although he lacked an academic education, he dedicated his life to investigating the microscopic world using handmade, single-lensed microscopes and magnifiers. An expert observer, he planned experiments and designed equipment to test his theories. His pioneering discoveries included blood cells, protozoa, bacteria and spermatozoa, and resulted in an international reputation among the scientific and upper classes of 17th and 18th century Europe, aided by his Fellowship of the Royal Society of London.

This lavishly illustrated biography sets his legacy of scientific achievements against the ideas and reactions of his fellow scientists and other contemporaries.
Encounters across Arts, Sciences and Humanities
Experimental Practices seeks to develop the status of science, art, and literature as truly experimental practices and forms of knowledge production – each borrowing from the other in order to further its drive to invention and innovation.
In times of environmental, political, and technological transformation and crisis, the urge to forge new alliances between the humanities, arts, and sciences has given rise to disciplinary hybrids, such as the environmental humanities, the medical humanities, artistic research, or the neurohumanities – all of which signal a turn towards ecological, more-than-human and posthumanist approaches in resonance with a broad array of worldly concerns. In this context, Experimental Practices is a platform for experimental forms of research at the intersections of the humanities, sciences, as well as activists outside academia around issues that shape contemporary and future cultures.
Taking “experimentation” as the practice, topic, and aim of the series, the editors welcome monographs or collected volumes around a specific concept or theme that contribute and enact a practice-based as well as theory-driven poetics of knowledge.
The series is committed to continue a fruitful collaboration with the international SLSA (Society for the Study of Literature, Science, and the Arts), including its independent European branch SLSAeu.
Media as Infrastructures and Cultural Practices
Traffic: Media as Infrastructures and Cultural Practices presents a collection of texts by distinguished international media and cultural scholars that addresses fundamental relationships between the logistic, symbolic, and infrastructural dimensions of media. The volume discusses the role of traffic and infrastructures within the history of media theory as well as in a broader cultural context: Traffic is shown to constitute an important epistemological and technical principle, a paradigm for exchanges and circulations between discoursive and non-discoursive cultural practices. This opens an encompassing perspective of media ecology, and at the same time illuminates the formative power of traffic as structuring time and space: material and informational traffic creates, maintains, and undermines power, configures meaning, and facilitates appropriation and resistance.
The Role of Private Transport Companies in Dutch and British Immigration Control
Author: Sophie Scholten
The central theoretical question of The Privatisation of Immigration Control through Carrier Sanctions concerns the social working of legal rules. Sophie Scholten examines how states, private companies (carriers) and people (passengers) have become interconnected through carrier sanctions legislation.
Scholten describes the legal framework in the Netherlands and the UK and international and European legislative rules developed on the subject. The author ties in with debates on privatisation of control in general and of immigration control in particular. As such the author provides a much needed new look at a field which as not attracted detailed academic attention. Scholten opens up fascinating questions about the relationship of the public and private sectors in the complex and politically sensitive area of immigration.
Editor: Dimitri Ginev
Cognitive existentialism is a version of hermeneutic philosophy. The volume provides a summation of the critical approaches to this version. All essays are engaged in probing the value of universal hermeneutics. Drawing on various conceptions developed in analytical and Continental traditions, the authors explore the interpretative dimensions of scientific inquiry. They try to place the projects of their investigations in historical, socio-cultural, and political contexts. The task of extending hermeneutics to the natural sciences is an initiative of much relevance to the dialogue between the scientific and humanistic culture. A special aspect of this dialogue, addressed by all authors, is the promotion of interpretive reflexivity in both kinds of academic culture.
Based on a multidisciplinary analysis, the book presents a contemporary view of the main challenges facing regional development and regional policy in Central and Eastern Europe, particularly considering to what extent domestic and non-domestic legacies have affected the regionalization process in this area. The volume mainly focuses on the institutional arrangements at regional level, analyzing the motives, procedures and outcomes of either political or administrative reforms introduced in the latest years. The focus are the former communist countries, both members of the EU and not (case studies selected: Romania, Hungary, Poland and Serbia), with a specific chapter concentrating on a case study from the West – England – whose process of regionalization provides a useful point of reference for the experiences of its Central-East counterparts.