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Mit Diskussionsbeiträgen von Martin Bunte, Jakub Kloc-Konkołowicz, Hernán Pringe, Jacco Verburgt, Kenneth R. Westphal und Manfred Wetzel
Volume Editors: Werner Flach and Christian Krijnen
Freiheit ist ein Grundbegriff der modernen Philosophie und die Freiheitskonzeptionen Kants und Hegels bilden wichtige Quellen, um Freiheit zu begreifen. Allerdings sind nicht nur Sinn und Gehalt ihrer Konzeptionen bis heute umstritten, sondern auch eine adäquate Bewertung erweist sich als ein Desiderat der Forschung.
In der vorliegenden Studie bringt Werner Flach Kants geltungs- und prinzipientheoretische Freiheitslehre zur Darstellung und sucht zu zeigen, welches Erklärungspotential diese Lehre in puncto Humanität hat. Christian Krijnen bringt hingegen Hegels logische und geistphilosophische Freiheitslehre zur Darstellung und sucht zu zeigen, dass und wie in Kants Lehre der fundamentale Aspekt der Wirklichkeit der Freiheit unterbeleuchtet bleibt. Die Diskussionsbeiträge von Martin Bunte, Jakub Kloc-Konkołowicz, Hernán Pringe, Jacco Verburgt, Kenneth R. Westphal und Manfred Wetzel machen deutlich, welchen Stellenwert dem einen und dem anderen Paradigma im aktuellen Urteil zuerkannt wird.

Freedom is one of the main issues of modern philosophy and Kant’s and Hegel’s conceptions of freedom form a major source for comprehending it. However, not only are both Kant’s and Hegel’ conceptions discussed controversially, in the philosophical debate it also remains highly contested which of them offers a more thorough account of freedom.
In this volume, Werner Flach presents Kant’s conception of freedom as well as its potential for understanding basic features of humanity. Christian Krijnen presents Hegel’s conception of freedom and shows that Kant’s conception neglects an essential feature that concerns the actualization of freedom. In their contributions to the discussion, Martin Bunte, Jakub Kloc-Konkołowicz, Hernán Pringe, Jacco Verburgt, Kenneth R. Westphal, and Manfred Wetzel assess the results.
Author: Diana Gasparyan
Merab Mamardashvili (1930-1990) is a legend of Russian and Russian-Soviet philosophy. His work sought to cultivate an “awakening to thought,” to help his interlocuters distinguish between truth and falsity. This book serves as an in-depth investigation into the life and work of one of the most prominent philosophers of Russian and Russian-Soviet history, collecting his ideas here in one book. The author explains the philosophical foundations of his ideas, as they relate to the broader traditions of philosophy of consciousness, phenomenology, existentialism, transcendental philosophy, and Continental philosophy. However, his ideas also lead much further - deep into philosophy itself, its cultural origins, and to the basis and roots of all human thought.
This book provides philosophical insight into the nature of reality by reflecting on its ontological qualities through the medium of film. The main question is whether we have access to reality through film that is not based on visual representation or narration: Is film—in spite of its immateriality—a way to directly grasp and reproduce reality? Why do we perceive film as “real” at all? What does it mean to define its own reproducibility as an ontological feature of reality? And what does film as a medium exactly show? The contributions in this book provide, from a cinematic perspective, diverse philosophical analyses to the understanding of the challenging concept of “the real of reality”.
History stands not only for a narrative or descriptive relation to the past, but also for an ongoing process in which we are involved on several levels: in ordinary life as well as in our epistemic endeavours, natural science and technology included. Historicity is thus not only an important question for historians, but for everyone interested in understanding what all our civilisation is about. The present volume sheds some light on different aspects of this ontological dependence. The first part deals with the historicity of understanding (Françoise Dastur, Arbogast Schmitt, Samuel Weber), the second with the limits of making (Emil Angehrn, Nicholas Davey, Jan-Ivar Lindén) and the third with the future of memory (Jayne Svenungsson, Christoph Türcke, Bernhard Waldenfels).
Ancient philosophy has from the outset inspired phenomenological philosophers in a special way. Phenomenological Interpretations of Ancient Philosophy offers fresh perspectives on the manner in which ancient Greek thought has influenced phenomenology and traces the history of this reception. Unlike various related treatments, the present volume offers a broad account of this topic that includes chapters on Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Jacob Klein, Hannah Arendt, Eugen Fink, Jan Patočka, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jacques Derrida.

This collection of essays, edited by Kristian Larsen and Pål Rykkja Gilbert, is addressed to students of ancient philosophy and the phenomenological tradition as well as to readers who have a general interest in the fascinating, yet complex, connection between ancient Greek thought and phenomenological philosophy.

Contributions by: Jussi Backman, Pål Rykkja Gilbert, Burt Hopkins, Filip Karfík, Alexander Kozin, Kristian Larsen, Arnaud Macé, Claudio Majolino, Hans Ruin, Thomas Schwarz Wentzer, Vigdis Songe-Møller, Tanja Staehler, Morten S. Thaning and Charlotta Weigelt.
Author: Gino Zaccaria
In this book, Gino Zaccaria offers a philosophical meditation on the issue of art in light of its originary sense. He shows how this sense can be fully understood provided that our thinking, on the one hand, returns to the ancient Greek world where it must heed the voice and hints of the goddess Athena, and, on the other hand, listens to “artist-thinkers” close to our current epoch, such as Cézanne, van Gogh and Boccioni. Indeed, the path of this meditation has as its guide the well-known sentence by the painter from Aix-en-Provence, which reads: “Je vous dois la vérité en peinture, et je vous la dirai !”. What will finally appear in this way will not be an abstract or historical notion of art, but its enigma; that is to say, the promise of “another initiation” of art itself.
Iraklis Ioannidis offers fresh, yet radical, philosophical insights into the much contested topic of altruism. Whereas the debate on altruism, since time immemorial, consists in trying to determine whether we are biologically altruistic or not, Ioannidis explores altruism otherwise. Following Nietzsche, he traces altruism to the phenomenon of promising or giving one’s word. His analysis provokes us to think that our possibility to exist cannot be realized without this event.

Ioannidis’ passage to altruism attempts to perform altruism while exploring it. By reversing the axioms of classical phenomenology, what he calls unbracketing, he welcomes in his writing space any discourse, any human expression which could help the philosophical investigation.
Volume Editor: Jeremiah Morelock
How to Critique Authoritarian Populism: Methodologies of the Frankfurt School offers a comprehensive introduction to the techniques used by the early Frankfurt School to study and combat authoritarianism and authoritarian populism. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in the writings of the early Frankfurt School, at the same time as authoritarian populist movements are resurging in Europe and the Americas. This volume shows why and how Frankfurt School methodologies can and should be used to address the rise of authoritarianism today. Critical theory scholars are assembled from a variety of disciplines to discuss Frankfurt School approaches to dialectical philosophy, psychoanalytic theory, human subjects research, discourse analysis and media studies.

Contributors include: Robert J. Antonio, Stefanie Baumann, Christopher Craig Brittain, Dustin J. Byrd, Mariana Caldas Pinto Ferreira, Panayota Gounari, Peter-Erwin Jansen, Imaculada Kangussu, Douglas Kellner, Dan Krier, Lauren Langman, Claudia Leeb, Gregory Joseph Menillo, Jeremiah Morelock, Felipe Ziotti Narita, Michael R. Ott, Charles Reitz, Avery Schatz, Rudolf J. Siebert, William M. Sipling, David Norman Smith, Daniel Sullivan, and AK Thompson.
Jean-François Lyotard, Pedagogy, Thought
Author: Derek R. Ford
In the first monograph on Lyotard and education, the author approaches Lyotard’s thought as pedagogical in itself. The result is a novel, soft, and accessible study of Lyotard organized around two inhuman educations: that of “the system” and that of “the human.” The former enforces an interminable process of development, dialogue and exchange, while the latter finds its force in the mute, secret, opaque, and inarticulable.

Threading together a range of Lyotard’s work through four pedagogical processes—reading, writing, voicing, and listening—the author insists on the distinct educational logics that can uphold or interrupt different ways of being-together in the world, touching on a range of topics from literacy and aesthetics to time and political-economy. While Inhuman Educations can serve as an introduction to Lyotard’s philosophy, it also constitutes a singular, provocative, and fresh take on his thought.
Editor: Peter Šajda
In debates about philosophical anthropology human beings have been defined in different ways. In Modern and Postmodern Crises of Symbolic Structures, the contributors view the human being primarily as animal symbolicum. They examine how the human being creates, interprets and changes symbolic structures, as well as how he is affected and impacted by them. The focus lies on the context of modernity and postmodernity, which is characterized by a number of interrelated crises of symbolic structures. These crises have affected the realms of science, religion, art, politics and education, and thus provoked crucial changes in the human being’s relations to himself, others and reality. The crises are not viewed merely as manifestations of dysfunctions, but rather as complex processes of transformation that also provide new opportunities.