Eine ethnographische Untersuchung zur sprachlichen Praxis am Nachmittag
Author: Farina Böttjer
Mittels teilnehmender Beobachtungen werden die sprachlichen Praktiken innerhalb des untersuchten Ganztags differenziert beleuchtet und analysiert.
Einem ethnografischen Forschungsstil folgend wird der Frage nach der Rolle von Familiensprachen im Offenen Ganztag einer Grundschule in Nordrhein-Westfalen nachgegangen. Es wird herausgearbeitet, wie und von wem Familiensprachen relevant gemacht, eingefordert oder restriktiv behandelt werden und was die Situationen kennzeichnet, in denen Familiensprachen eine Rolle spielen. Im Ergebnis zeigen sich widersprüchliche Praktiken, die je nach involvierten Personen, Kontexten und Settings variieren. Die Studie trägt dazu bei, das bislang noch wenig untersuchte Feld des Offenen Ganztags innerhalb der Forschung zu mehrsprachigen Praktiken im Bildungssystem zu erschließen.
Bild und Bilddidaktik im christlich-islamischen Dialog
Religion lebt in Bildern. Bilder stiften Gemeinschaft. Gleichzeitig ziehen Bilder Grenzen zwischen Menschen. In diesem Spannungsfeld erforscht die vorliegende Arbeit Kriterien eines angemessenen Umgangs mit religiöser Bildlichkeit in interkulturellen und interreligiösen Lernsituationen.
Diese interdisziplinäre Forschungsarbeit im Schnittbereich von Religions- und Kunstpädagogik analysiert die Bedeutung verbildlichter Religion für das interkulturelle und interreligiöse Lernen zwischen Menschen christlicher und islamischer Prägung. Dazu untersucht der Autor zentrale Verbildlichungen des Christentums und des Islams vor dem Hintergrund imaginationstheoretischer und bildwissenschaftlicher Erkenntnisse und im Abgleich mit religionspädagogischen und kunstpädagogischen Bildumgangskonzepten. Darauf aufbauend entwickelt er Grundlagen einer interkulturellen und interreligiösen Bilddidaktik und legt dar, welchen Beitrag Religions- und Kunstpädagogik zu einem mündigen Umgang mit kulturellen Figurationen im Allgemeinen und mit religiösen Verbildlichungen im Speziellen leisten können.
Volume Editor: Lauren Cifuentes
The rapid rise of e-learning worldwide means that campuses are creating new positions in distance learning leadership, often at the vice-president or vice-provost level. Frequently, those applying for such positions are recently graduated doctoral students or faculty members who have never served in administration. Unlike any other book to date, this Guide to Administering Online Learning provides easy access to an overview of tasks to be accomplished or maintained and perspectives to consider in order to direct dynamic online initiatives. In it, experienced distance learning teachers and administrators share their insights regarding what must be done to administer effective online learning, including theoretical insights as well as practical principles. They provide comprehensive guidelines for addressing issues and needs that distance learning administrators currently face: barriers to adoption, policies, legalities, ethics, strategic planning, emerging technologies, design of professional development, management of the course development process, quality assurance, student support, and recruitment and marketing. This book is a timely offering from those who have effectively led distance learning initiatives for those who are interested in leading distance learning for the next generation of learners. Each chapter includes questions, prompts, or activities to help readers relate the concept to their own experiences.
Author: Nancy A. Wasser
“I just cannot write” or “I am not a good writer” are familiar complaints from students in academia. Many academic students claim they cannot express themselves clearly in written text, and their lack of this skill impedes them in their academic career. In this book, the author argues that teachers can help solve this when they start viewing writing not as secondary to reading, but as the equally important side of the same coin. Those who cannot read, will not be able to write.

The author explains how teaching and regular practicing of how to write from an early age onwards helps children grow into students who are self-aware of their voices. By employing narrative as a process of learning to write and a way to read, teachers can teach children the art of writing, while also making children more aware of their own constructions of narrative. Combining the focus on individual and group expression in writing lessons, students can trace and reflect on their own life transformations through their writing process.

Good writers are not born that way, but made through effort and practice. Changes in the U.S. curriculum may not only lead to better-expressed citizens, but also to a more equal society in which both teachers and children have a voice.
Author: Augie Fleras
The multiculturalization of Canada has catapulted it into the front ranks of countries in advancing a principled diversity governance. Fifty years after the inception of a multicultural governance model that seemingly works and is relatively popular, Canada remains one of the few countries in the world to believe in multiculturalism. Yet the irony is inescapable: Notwithstanding its lofty status as a Canadian icon and an aspirational ideal, an official multiculturalism remains misunderstood both in Canada and abroad in terms of what it means, how it works and for whom, and why it endures. If anything, as the book explains, the idea of multiculturalism remains shrouded in the conceptual fog of a ‘riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma’. An interplay of polite fictions that mask inconvenient truths puts the onus on deconstructing Canadian multiculturalism by conceptualizing strengths (including a probe into why multiculturalism ostensibly works in Canada but rarely elsewhere), analyzing weaknesses, critically assessing its worth, and envisioning its future in responding to the new realities and demands of a post-multicultural world. That Canada’s multiculturalism remains a work in progress, albeit one with innovative possibilities, provides a fitting tribute.
Connecting Theory and Practice (4th Edition)
Authors: Wendy Patton and Mary McMahon
This fourth edition of the book represents a milestone in the history of the Systems Theory Framework that attests to its continuing influence and contemporary relevance. It emphasises changes in career development theory, practice, and research since its first edition in 1999. At that time, the publication of the STF was described by reviewers as a “groundbreaking departure from traditional counseling texts”, a “landmark work leading to the convergence of career development theories”, and as a “rare book that not only illuminates a field of study but also advances it”. Subsequent commentary attests to the strength of the metatheoretical contribution of the STF and its facilitation of links between theory, research, and practice. This book introduces systems theory and the STF, and comprehensively overviews traditional and contemporary career theory and analyses it through the metatheoretical lens of the STF. It then describes applications of the STF by applying systems thinking, systems mapping and experiential learning. Finally, the contributions and future directions of the STF are highlighted. This book provides a record of almost 30 years of contribution of the STF to the career theory, research, and practice field.
Leadership Lessons and Mentoring Moments from the Lives of Everyday Educators
Volume Editors: John H. Curry and Sean R. Jackson
Informal learning experiences drive many into the education realm. For some, the opportunity to coach young people in sports or other extra-curricular programs is what motivates them to get out of bed in the morning. It is in these contexts that young people acquire some of the lessons that have stood the tests of time in their memory, and formulated their being. It is these moments that we hope to capture and pass on through this collective work.
The Greatest Lecture I Was Never Taught: Leadership Lessons and Mentoring Moments from the Lives of Everyday Educators asks educators from all sectors (K12, Higher Education, Educational Administrators, Medical, Military, Coaching, etc.) to reflect on these moments and help us pass them on. Some took this as an opportunity to finally thank a mentor. Others presented information on what shaped their priorities; and still others just wanted to tell a story. Whatever their motivation, this collection should serve as an investigation on how the informal teaching moments are a leader’s and mentor’s greatest tool.
Leadership and Best Practices in Educational Technology Management provides a collaborative effort between the AECT and Brill to present opportunities for focused writings on leadership within the field and within the organization. The mission of the series is to document leadership, management and administration issues, best practices, and research within the field of educational technology (digital learning, e-learning, online/distance/blended learning, etc.). Volumes are published on a variety of topics and may include:

• Distance education leadership and administration
• Leading program development
• Leading innovation and change
• Diffusion and scaling of innovations
• Leading within the field of educational technology
• Mentoring within the field of educational technology
• International Perspectives and Leadership Issues
• Educational technology policy, regulatory and accreditation issues
• Establishing, leading and managing multi-institutional initiatives
• Establishing and leading competency-based and micro-credential
• Leading departments and centers for instructional design, teaching and learning, online learning, faculty development, etc.
Selected Papers of Mark Olssen
Author: Mark Olssen
Inspired by the writings of Michel Foucault, Olssen’s writings traverse philosophy, politics, education, and epistemology. This book comprises a selection of his papers published in academic journals and books over twenty-five years. Taken as a whole, the papers represent a redirection of the core axioms and directions of western ontology and philosophy in relation to how history, the subject, and education are theorised within the western philosophical tradition. Olssen’s writings not only contain a powerful critique and revision of western liberalism from a poststructuralist perspective, they both explicate and extend Michel Foucault’s challenge to the core axioms and assumptions underpinning western thought. As Stephen Ball suggests in his Foreword to this volume, “Olssen uses Foucault to explore issues… Olssen’s Foucault is not a lonely nihilist but a troubled provocateur who encourages in us toward the political project of self-formation – our relation to ourselves and always, to others."
Author: J.E. Sumerau
Who am I? Where did I come from? What is a family? How do families of choice develop?

These questions permeate the pages of Scarecrow wherein a bisexual, nonbinary trans feminine person named Erin seeks to make sense of her life in relation to the places, people, and events she has seen and left behind over time. As the novel begins, Erin tells us that “39 funerals, 35 years, and too many lovers to bother remembering brought me to this point.” From this opening statement, Erin reflects on three-and-a-half decades of experiences growing up working class, white, and queer in the southeastern U.S.; navigating sexual, gender, classed, racial, and religious meanings and relationships; surviving varied types of love, trauma, kindness, and violence; and joining the upper-middle class world of the professoriate. As the novel progresses, she shows us how these experiences intertwine, create opportunities, and leave scars that together fashion who she has become over time and in relation to others.

Scarecrow could be utilized in the teaching of sociology, social psychology, Symbolic Interactionism, narrative, families, gender, sexualities, race, class, geography, biography, Southern Studies, LGBTQIA studies, trauma recovery, courses about aging and the life course, or of course, it could be read entirely for pleasure.