Browse results

Zur Kritik materialistischer Bildungstheorie und -praxis
Author: Roger Behrens
Die Debatten über Bildung und Erziehung sowie deren Sinn und Zweck haben Konjunktur. Obwohl unter einem allgemeinen Vorzeichen der Kritik stehend, spielt eine materialistische Bildungstheorie und -praxis in diesen Debatten keine Rolle mehr.
Noch in den 1970er Jahren gingen von der kritischen Theorie der Bildung, Erziehung und Pädagogik entscheidende Impulse aus; mit kritischen Konzepten wie »materialistische Bildungstheorie« oder »dialektische Pädagogik« konnte das humanistische Bildungsideal auch praktisch aktualisiert werden (antiautoritäre Erziehung, Kinderladenbewegung, freie Schulen etc.). Allerdings sind solche gesellschaftlichen Interventionen heute restlos integriert, die kritischen Motive weitgehend absorbiert, entschärft oder schlechterdings vergessen. Eingebettet in eine kritische Begriffs- und Gesellschaftsanalyse rekonstruiert die Studie historisch und systematisch dieses »Scheitern«, beleuchtet aber auch das »Machbare« einer materialistischen Bildungstheorie und -praxis.
A Review of Educational Research
Preparing Indonesian Youth: A Review of Educational Research offers insights into the challenges and prospects in preparing Indonesian youth for 21st century living. The chapters feature empirically-based case studies focusing on three aspects of education in Indonesia: teaching and teachers; school practices, programs, and innovations; and the social contexts of youth and education.

The case studies also represent different vantage points contributing to an enriched understanding of how larger social phenomenon—for example, education decentralisation in Indonesia (rural-urban and transnational) migration, international assessments, and the global feminist and women’s movement—impact and interact with enacted visions of preparing all youth educationally for work, as well as for meaningful participation in their respective communities and the Indonesian society at large.

Contributors are: Anindito Aditomo, Hasriadi Masalam, Juliana Murniati, Ahmad Bukhori Muslim, Wahyu Nurhayati, Shuki Osman, Margaretha Purwanti, Esti Rahayu, Ila Rosmilawati, Andrew Rosser, Widjajanti M. Santoso, Anne Suryani, Aries Sutantoputra, Novita W. Sutantoputri, Isabella Tirtowalujo, Nina Widyawati and David Wright.    
The idea of transformation in higher education underpins all policy documents, academic literature and on-going debates in South Africa. Transforming Universities in South Africa: Pathways to Higher Education Reform responds to the pressing need to comprehensively review the post-apartheid experience and assess where South Africa’s higher education stands across the continent and globally, particularly within the country’s efforts to overcome decades of socio-economic imbalances. It addresses the question of whether South Africa’s transformation strategy from apartheid to democracy was simply a symbolic new flag-raising and new anthem singing exercise reflecting a transition akin to those limited decolonization projects elsewhere in the world, or whether something more fundamental was possible and was achieved with political and policy implications for other countries in Africa and globally. This volume's ultimate purpose is to provide a basis for imagining new futures in which South Africa higher education in the context of Africa and the global world takes centre stage.
Stories from the Field – Resolving Educational Leadership Dilemmas
In You Can’t Make This Up! the author invites both emerging educational leaders and practicing school administrators to read a series of short stories recounted by principals and vice principals employed in schools across the United States, in Germany and Cyprus. This collection of present-day stories highlights the types of challenges school leaders encounter on a daily basis, all of which demand informed decisions, but none of which are easily resolved.

Each story is presented in a case study format, and aligned with selected elements within one of the ten Professional Standards for Educational Leadership (PSEL). At a critical juncture in each case, a series of “questions to ponder” is presented, followed by a segment describing “what actually occurred?”
This edited book considers the main issues and controversies within the current educational context of inclusive education, from an international perspective. Authorities in the field such as Norwich, Kauffman, and Boyle, amongst many other international scholars, provide an enticing insight into many of the issues and controversies around inclusive education, and whether it is achievable or not. We have reached a point in time where inclusive education has been the prevailing doctrine for universal education policies. However, there are still many challenges facing those working within the inclusive education space, with some countries actually becoming less inclusive.

International and national legislation has continued to move towards inclusive education, yet there seems to be many gaps between the philosophy and the principles of inclusive education and systemic practice.

The book aims to address the current debates surrounding the implementation of inclusive education, and also offers insights into the inconsistencies between policies and practices in inclusive environments. Moreover, it analyzes contemporary research evidence on the effectiveness of inclusion and identify directions for future research.

Contributors are: Kelly-Ann Allen, Dimitris Anastasiou, Joanna Anderson, Adrian Ashman, Jeanmarie Badar, Christopher Boyle, Jonathan M. Campbell, Heather Craig, Leire Darretxe, Julian Elliott, Zuriñe Gaintza, Betty A. Hallenbeck, Divya Jindal-Snape, Marguerite Jones, James M. Kauffman, George Koutsouris, Fraser Lauchlan, Gerry Mac Ruairc, Sofia Mavropoulou, Daniel Mays, Brahm Norwich, Angela Page, Kirsten S. Railey, and Federico R. Waitoller.
In the wake of Donald J. Trump’s unprecedented victory and his administration’s multi-pronged attacks on an array of vulnerable populations, a diverse collection of scholars was asked to document the ways in which marginalized peoples have experienced the first years of Trump mayhem. The essays in this volume ask us to think through tough narratives of exclusion, exile, and pain. The challenge in this book is to represent the unrepresentable, to document in chilling detail how Trump, his allies in government, and his unshakeable base have weaponized the culture war and threatened the ideals of the Republic. This book invites us to experience the scarifying perspective of the marginalized Other, to remember to honor all our most human stories that, woven together, make up the collective ‘us;’ the collective ‘U.S.’ The editors also hope this collection suggests a way forward, a way to defeat American nativism and a way to end the war on those of us who are, on this sad day, our nation’s public enemies.
The evolving societal, political and economic landscape has led to increased demands on higher education institutions to make their contribution and benefits to society more visible, and in many cases with fewer public resources. This book contributes to the understanding of the responsibilities of Higher Education and the challenges posed to the production and circulation of knowledge. It raises questions about the role of higher education in society, its responsibility towards students and staff, and regarding its intended impact. The book brings together a range of topical papers, and a diversity of perspectives: scientific investigations of reputed scholars, critical evidence-based papers of third space professionals, and policymakers’ perspectives on the daily practice and management of higher education institutions and systems. The variety of both content and contributors elevates the richness of the book and its relevance for a large audience.

Contributors are: Victor M. H. Borden, Lex Borghans, Bruno Broucker, Hamish Coates, Gwilym Croucher, Lisa Davidson, Mark Engberg, Philipp Friedrich, Martina Gaisch, Solomon Gebreyohans Gebru, Ton Kallenberg, Kathi A. Ketcheson, Lu Liu, Alfredo Marra, Clare Milsom, Kenneth Moore, Roberto Moscati, Marjolein Muskens, Daniela Nömeyer, Attila Pausits, Svetlana Shenderova, Wafa Singh, Chuanyi Wang, Denyse Webbstock, Gregory Wolniak, and Jiale Yang.
The lack of academic integrity combined with the prevalence of fraud and other forms of unethical behavior are problems that higher education faces in both developing and developed countries, at mass and elite universities, and at public and private institutions. While academic misconduct is not new, massification, internationalization, privatization, digitalization, and commercialization have placed ethical challenges higher on the agenda for many universities. Corruption in academia is particularly unfortunate, not only because the high social regard that universities have traditionally enjoyed, but also because students—young people in critical formative years—spend a significant amount of time in universities. How they experience corruption while enrolled might influence their later personal and professional behavior, the future of their country, and much more. Further, the corruption of the research enterprise is especially serious for the future of science. The contributors to Corruption in Higher Education: Global Challenges and Responses bring a range of perspectives to this critical topic.
Diverse National Engagements with Paradoxes of Policy and Practice
Moving towards Inclusive Education: Diverse National Engagements with Paradoxes of Policy and Practice presents perspectives from Asia-Pacific and Europe that have seldom been heard in international debates. While there may be global consensus around United Nations' goals for inclusion in education, each country's cultural and religious understandings shape national views regarding the priorities for inclusion. Some countries focus on disability, while others bring in concerns about culture, ethnicity, language, gender and/or sexuality. In this fascinating collection, senior commentators explore the ethical difficulties as well as hopes for a more inclusive education in their countries, raising questions of interest for educators, policy-makers and all who support the work of inclusive education.

Contributors are: Vishalache Balakrishnan, Bayarmaa Bazarsuren, Cleonice Alves Bosa, Yen-Hsin Chen, Lise Claiborne, Tim Corcoran, Bronwyn Davies, Carol Hamilton, Dorothea W. Hancock, Mashrur Imtiaz, Maria Kecskemeti, Silvia Helena Koller, Yvonne Leeman, Sonja Macfarlane, Roger Moltzen, Sikder Monoare Murshed, Sanjaabadam Sid, Simone Steyer, Eugeniusz Świtała, Wiel Veugelers, and Ben Whitburn.
Using a range of critical perspectives, On the Question of Truth in the Era of Trump closely examines notions of “truth in crisis” leading up to and after the election of Donald Trump. The authors explore how truth is constructed along the lines of race, social class, and gender as filtered through the self-referential characteristics of social media in particular. The authors assert that the US left has shown itself inadequate to the task of confronting right wing ideologies, which have only intensified since the 2016 election, resulting in increased mobilization of white supremacist and nationalist groups.

Whether underestimating Trump by downplaying the threat of his candidacy during the primaries, trivializing the concerns of women and minorities as “identity politics,” or rushing to prioritize the free speech rights of the far-right, left academics and the media have found themselves unable to use their traditional arsenal of evidence, rational discourse, and appeals to diversity of viewpoints.

The authors assert that political resistance to the right is not a matter of playful use of signs and symbols or discourse alone and has to be fought directly and in solidarity. At this point, it is clear that Trump and his supporters have not just deployed relativism as a form of strategy, but have fully weaponized it against their perceived enemies: women, immigrants, minorities, LGBTQ people along with educational, scientific, and journalistic institutions. It is hoped that this in-depth, critical dissection of truth in the current political reality will assist in the project of resistance.

Contributors are: Faith Agostinone-Wilson, Mike Cole, Jeremy T. Godwin, Jones Irwin, Austin Pickup, Daniel Ian Rubin, and Eric C. Sheffield.