Restricted Access

Aiga von Hippel, Claudia Kulmus and Maria Stimm

Restricted Access
Advances in Creativity and Gifted Education is the first internationally established book series that focuses exclusively on the constructs of creativity and giftedness as pertaining to the psychology, philosophy, pedagogy and ecology of talent development across the milieus of family, school, institutions and society. Advances in Creativity and Gifted Education strives to synthesize both domain specific and domain general efforts at developing creativity, giftedness and talent. The books in the series are international in scope and include the efforts of researchers, clinicians and practitioners across the globe.
Restricted Access
This international book series attempts to do justice to adult education as an ever expanding field. It is intended to be internationally inclusive and attract writers and readers from different parts of the world. It also attempts to cover many of the areas that feature prominently in this amorphous field. It is a series that seeks to underline the global dimensions of adult education, covering a whole range of perspectives. In this regard, the series seeks to fill in an international void by providing a book series that complements the many journals, professional and academic, that exist in the area. The scope would be broad enough to comprise such issues as ‘Adult Education in specific regional contexts’, ‘Adult Education in the Arab world’, ‘Participatory Action Research and Adult Education’, ‘Adult Education and Participatory Citizenship’, ‘Adult Education and the World Social Forum’, ‘Adult Education and Disability’, ‘Adult Education and the Elderly’, ‘Adult Education in Prisons’, ‘Adult Education, Work and Livelihoods’, ‘Adult Education and Migration’, ‘The Education of Older Adults’, ‘Southern Perspectives on Adult Education’, ‘Adult Education and Progressive Social Movements’, ‘Popular Education in Latin America and Beyond’, ‘Eastern European perspectives on Adult Education’, ‘An anti-Racist Agenda in Adult Education’, ‘Postcolonial perspectives on Adult Education’, ‘Adult Education and Indigenous Movements’, ‘Adult Education and Small States’. There is also room for single country studies of Adult Education provided that a market for such a study is guaranteed.
Restricted Access

Living a Motivated Life

A Memoir and Activities

Raymond J. Wlodkowski

What if, as psychologists and adult educators advocate, a person chose a life where his motivation for the work itself determined what he did? Living a Motivated Life: A Memoir and Activities follows the author through forty years, revealing how he selected vocational pursuits guided by his understanding of intrinsic motivation and transformative learning. As a compass for relevant decisions, these ideas gave energy and purpose to how he lived, and an instinct as sure as sight for the future.

Written with nuance, humor, and unpredictability, this story renders how he came to appreciate learning for the pleasure of learning. Facing similar challenges as those of today’s first generation college students, the memoir narrates his unexpected college enrollment, his friendship with an ancient history professor, and his triumphs and travails as teacher, psychologist, human relations specialist, psychotherapist, and adult educator.

This is the first memoir of someone who consciously chose to lead a professional life to experience flow on a daily basis. It is an important step in the integration and evolution of intrinsic motivation theory and transformative learning. But it reaches beyond this outcome, sharing how the author aspired to be better at what he valued and showing how he discovered and extended these ideas to others.
Restricted Access

Series:

Anne Ryan and Tony Walsh

Reflexivity and Critical Pedagogy highlights the essential nature of reflexivity in creating sites for transformative possibilities in education. The book argues that seemingly intractable epistemological inequalities are embedded within educational structures and processes and also contends that perspectives which define knowledge as a unitary truth are essentially inadequate to address current global problems. Further, it argues that people and ideas traditionally positioned outside the academy are vital to developing more effective educational interventions.

This volume stresses the influence of dominant societal discourses in creating and sustaining particular and limited definitions of knowledge. It also explores their power in delineating acceptable processes of knowledge dissemination. These discourses, whether consciously or otherwise, indwell teachers, learners and policy-makers as well as educational structures and organisations. It proposes reflexivity as the key component needed to combat such forces and one that is an essential ingredient in critical pedagogy.
Restricted Access

Adults, Mathematics and Work

From Research into Practice

John J. Keogh, Theresa Maguire and John O’Donoghue

Adults use mathematics extensively in work even though they may deny it or dismiss their numerate behaviour as common sense. Their capacity for mathematics is invisible to them and confirms their ‘non-maths person’ self-perception, which has negative consequences for their life choices. In Adults, Mathematics and Work, the authors tackle and explain a number of paradoxes related to the curious relationship between adults and mathematics. It operationalises the benefits of workplace doctoral research by providing a set of the tools to review this mistaken self-perception in order to make workers’ abilities available for development. It also provides a systematic way of uncovering and recognising informal and non-formal learning to support employability and re-employability in an increasingly fluid work-landscape.
Restricted Access

Equity and Internationalization on Campus

Intersecting or Colliding Discourses for LGBTQ People?

Series:

Kaela Jubas

Every day, we hear how people, organizations, and ideas are moving across borders. We also hear about fairness and justice as fundamental social values. How, though, do these two discourses—one related to internationalization and the other to equity—converge in lived experience? The post-secondary institution is one setting where that question might be asked and people who are minoritized for their gender or sexual identities can provide important answers. While equity-oriented discourses assure LGBT people that they will be free from harassment and discrimination, an internationalization discourse might call them to engage in places where they are illegal. Equity and Internationalization on Campus shares findings from a Canadian study that explored how LGBT or ally post-secondary faculty, students, and staff encountered these two discourses. It offers much to scholars and staff committed to developing an equitable version of internationalization and an international version of equity.
Open Access

Continuity and Discontinuity in Learning Careers

Potentials for a Learning Space in a Changing World

Series:

Edited by Barbara Merrill, Andrea Galimberti, Adrianna Nizinska and José González-Monteagudo

Continuity and Discontinuity in Learning Careers: Potentials for a Learning Space in a Changing World focuses on the new challenges and threats posed to adult education as a potential way out of the economic crisis and social change. It explores the role of adult education in relation to the continuity and discontinuity of the learning careers and identities of adults in a range of adult education learning contexts in Europe and beyond. The focus is on non-traditional students and issues of inequality such as class, gender, ethnicity, age, disability and how inequalities may enable or constrain their learning careers and identities.
Restricted Access

Food Leadership

Leadership and Adult Learning for Global Food Systems Transformation

Edited by Catherine Etmanski

So much more than a human necessity, food is an entry point into a range of different topics: culture and tradition, health and well-being, small and large-scale business, ecology and politics, science and the arts, poverty and social justice, land use and civil society, global trade, traditional ecological knowledge, and more. From seed to table, the policies and practices related to all aspects of the food cycle create rich sites for learning and multiple opportunities for leadership. Although the topic of food has been gaining momentum in the field of Adult Education over the past decade, food has been relatively underexplored in the field of Leadership Studies. The purpose of this book, therefore, is to deepen our understanding and knowledge about leadership and adult learning in food-related movements worldwide. With contributing authors representing four countries and various indigenous groups, this book examines the diverse ways in which food activists, scholars, students, and practitioners are already demonstrating, debating, and documenting leadership and learning in the context of global food systems transformation. Furthermore, it documents how these actions are supporting the innovation needed to address the increasingly complex and interconnected socio-economic and environmental challenges associated with food and agriculture. Whereas much leadership theory continues to be developed from cases in business, social movements, or other, more traditional leadership sectors, this book invites leaders and educators to look to their plates and, by extension, to local, small-scale farmers and to nature itself as sources of inspiration in their work.
Restricted Access

Forging Solidarity

Popular Education at Work

Edited by Astrid von Kotze and Shirley Walters

Animating this book is a twofold question: In what ways are adult and popular educators responding to various harsh economic, political, cultural and environmental conditions? In doing so, are they planting seeds of hope for and imaginings of alternative futures which can connect individuals and communities locally and globally to achieve economic, ecological and social justice?
The book illustrates how transformative politics of solidarity often involve actors across vastly different backgrounds. Solidarity is therefore a political relationship that is forged through particular struggles situated in place and time across power differentials. The authors put popular education to work by describing and analysing their strategies and approaches. They do so using accessible language and engaging styles.
Popular education is a medium for dreaming, for imagining other futures. It is also essential for countering the wilful spreading of fake news and propagation of ignorance. Pedagogies of solidarity are necessary to building connections amongst people at a time when competitive individualism and alienation are rampant. Forging solidarity with and amongst communities is a means towards that end, and, indeed, an end in itself.