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A Critical Review for Educators, Librarians, Families, Researchers & Writers
This is an enriched reference guide for picture books published by Canadian houses between 2017–2019. Chapters cover a brief history of picture books, key themes in contemporary Canadian titles (matching broad curriculum outcomes in education), and response activities, including frameworks for critical literacy discussions, along with annotated bibliographies that specifically recognize titles by Indigenous authors and illustrators. Also included are original interviews with a dozen rising stars in Canadian writing and illustration. While the book is specifically geared for educators, it also supports public libraries, research in Education, and future picture book creation as well as families who are interested in supporting reading development and related literacy activities in the home setting.
Volume Editor: Jayaluxmi Naidoo
Within the era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, we are living in a technologically advanced society, and students and teacher educators need to be adequately prepared to succeed within this progressive society. Teaching and Learning for the 21st Century: Embracing the Fourth Industrial Revolution is an edited volume that situates teaching and learning for the 21st century within diverse contexts globally so that teacher educators could make sense of their professional knowledge, curriculum, classroom contexts and diverse students.

This book intends to frame and explore the different responsive and innovative pedagogies that are used for embracing the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Additionally, it aims to clarify some key concepts (for example blended learning, coding, digital, E-Learning, Internet, M-Learning, simulation and tools) in addition to other issues that surround teaching and learning for the 21st century. The book also exemplifies authentic case studies located within global contexts focusing on: the 21st-century curriculum, the 21st-century classroom environment, teachers in the 21st century and students in the 21st century.

Contributors from around the world (Australia, Indonesia, Mauritius, South Africa, Tanzania and the United States of America) share their innovations in education by interrogating research experiences and examples of good practice.
What We Say and Do Matters
Volume Editors: Katia González and Rhoda Frumkin
The ability of educators to provide a nurturing environment to support students’ cognitive, social-emotional, and physical well-being can impact not only the classroom as a learning space but may also have a long lasting effect on children and families. Educators are seeking ways to become better informed on how trauma can affect learners, individually and as a group, while also searching for evidence based practices to support pedagogical decision-making. This book provides readers with the opportunity to critically reflect upon ways research connects to practice while considering how stressors can be minimized to support students. A special section related to educators’ personal and professional growth is also included.
Author: Alexis Kokkos
We live in a socio-cultural reality which is dominated by an entrepreneurial and instrumental rationality, as well as by a discriminative and populist mentality. Questioning the validity of taken-for-granted sovereign perspectives is thus of vital importance. Our contact with art can serve as a pathway through which we might be empowered to identify false life values and develop the disposition and ability to challenge them.

The learning potential of aesthetic experience is, however, barely exploited within educational systems. In addition, although major scholars have contributed to a deeper understanding of the liberating dimension of processing important artworks, there has been surprisingly little discussion in the relevant literature focusing on educational practice.

Exploring Art for Perspective Transformation provides a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of theoretical views pertaining to the emancipatory process of exploring art. Moreover, it presents the educational method Transformative Learning through Aesthetic Experience (TLAE), with reference to particular examples of implementation. TLAE is addressed to adult educators and school teachers regardless of the subject they teach and their theoretical background on aesthetics. It involves engaging learners in exploring works from fine arts, literature, theatre, cinema and music with a view to promoting critical reflection on one’s potentially problematic perspectives.
Teachers in schools nowadays are challenged to create inclusive learning environments and safe spaces for encountering diversity in values, cultures and religions, as well as in (dis)ability and talent. Classrooms are micro-cosmoses in which local and global issues are confronted and addressed.

This volume discusses the characteristics of good teachers and the teaching that is needed in today’s and tomorrow’s schools. The focus is on research-based perspectives, with contributions from several internationally renowned scholars on what constitutes good and quality in teaching-studying-learning processes. The chapters focus on good teaching and good teachers from perspectives concerning the fundamental and transversal features of what constitutes a good teacher. More specifically, it is argued that good teachers in tomorrow’s schools will need capabilities that reflect the purpose of education, values in education, and talent in education.

As an outcome, the book provides insights into how, in attending not only to the cognitive but also to the affective, behavioral, moral and spiritual domains, teachers are able to support holistic growth and learning among their students in schools of the 21st century. This volume discusses good teaching for schools in the future from the perspectives of school pedagogy, educational psychology, and neuropsychology.
Access to and participation in education are critical issues in contemporary South Africa. Awareness of inclusiveness and equality is not recent, having possibly first been described in the dawn of the millennium by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Drawing from the current framings in the SADC education systems the contributors argue that ICT has a key role to play in transformation, Africanisation and decolonisation of education.

Contributors are: Skye Adams, Najma Agherdien, Andrew Crouch, Andries Du Plessis, Nazira Hoosen, Katijah Khoza-Shangase, Mhulaheni Maguvhe, Khetsiwe Masuku, Sharon Moonsamy, Munyane Mophosho, Nomfundo Moroe, Ramashego Shila Mphahlele, Ndileleni Mudzielwana, Shonisani Mulovhedzi, Anniah Mupawose, Mapula Ngoepe, Moshe Phoshoko, Dhanashree Pillay, Roshni Pillay, Ben Sebothoma and Susan Thuketana.
The Power of Autoethnographic Narratives in Education
Educational reality is weaved within stories, poems, and dialogues, as the author demonstrates his becoming of a transformative educator. Transformative learning is important for teachers to think about their practices, change their thinking, and share the stories of their experience for learners’ empowerment.

This is an autoethnographic account of the author's experience as a transformative and transforming educator that unfolds the ways he has used ethical dilemma story pedagogy to explore interpretative and creative spaces for transformative learning, both personally and with a group of trainee teachers who take the responsibility to facilitate students’ learning into a purposeful path. The ethical dilemma story pedagogy provides relatable scenarios to challenge and unsettle learners’ thought processes leading to acknowledgment of multiple viewpoints. Theorising Transformative Learning serves to help educators utilise the sociocultural contexts connected to students’ lives and experiences.
Series Editor: Tasos Barkatsas
The Global Education in the 21st Century series will address contemporary cutting-edge teaching, learning and research issues from a global perspective. The series will present a modern focus on the debates surrounding current and significant educational issues, as well as the technological advances that impact on contemporary educational practices during a period of rapid social and technological changes.
Series Editors: Tricia M. Kress and Robert Lake
Current educational reform rhetoric around the globe repeatedly invokes the language of 21st century learning and innovative thinking while contrarily re-enforcing, through government policy, high stakes testing and international competition, standardization of education that is exceedingly reminiscent of 19th century Taylorism and scientific management. Yet, as the steam engines of educational “progress” continue down an increasingly narrow, linear, and unified track, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the students in our classrooms are inheriting real world problems of economic instability, ecological damage, social inequality, and human suffering. If young people are to address these social problems, they will need to activate complex, interconnected, empathetic and multiple ways of thinking about the ways in which peoples of the world are interconnected as a global community in the living ecosystem of the world. Seeing the world as simultaneously local, global, political, economic, ecological, cultural and interconnected is far removed from the Enlightenment’s objectivist and mechanistic legacy that presently saturates the status quo of contemporary schooling. If we are to derail this positivist educational train and teach our students to see and be in the world differently, the educational community needs a serious dose of imagination. The goal of this book series is to assist students, practitioners, leaders, and researchers in looking beyond what they take for granted, questioning the normal, and amplifying our multiplicities of knowing, seeing, being and feeling to, ultimately, envision and create possibilities for positive social and educational change. The books featured in this series will explore ways of seeing, knowing, being, and learning that are frequently excluded in this global climate of standardized practices in the field of education. In particular, they will illuminate the ways in which imagination permeates every aspect of life and helps develop personal and political awareness. Featured works will be written in forms that range from academic to artistic, including original research in traditional scholarly format that addresses unconventional topics (e.g., play, gaming, ecopedagogy, aesthetics), as well as works that approach traditional and unconventional topics in unconventional formats (e.g., graphic novels, fiction, narrative forms, and multi-genre texts). Inspired by the work of Maxine Greene, this series will showcase works that “break through the limits of the conventional” and provoke readers to continue arousing themselves and their students to “begin again” (Greene, 1995, p. 109).
Series Editors: Juanjo Mena, Ruth Kane, and Cheryl J. Craig
The ISATT conference series represents an effort to compile international research and practices on Teacher Education. It draws upon a variety of educational approaches, procedures, and teaching contexts where the field takes form. The aims and scope of the ISATT book series is to promote and bring together the best papers presented at the Biennial conferences of the association. The ISATT’s main goal is to increase insights into the identity, role, contexts and work of teachers, and the process of teaching.