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Volume Editor: Joanna Kędra
The use of images in education is expanding, but clear and comprehensive guidelines on how to carry out visual activities with students of a variety of fields are difficult to find. With the case studies from Finland, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, Japan, Poland, Turkey and the United States, contributors to this volume offer detailed reflections on the pedagogical role of using images in higher education. Examples include drawing, collage making, video production, object-based learning, photography projects, and many more. The book constructs a solid argument for the further development of visual pedagogies in higher education, highlighting the need to support students in advancing their visual competency as it has become fundamental to command in everyday life and professional contexts.

Contributors are: Gyuzel Gadelshina, Tad Hara, McKenzie Lloyd-Smith, Gary McLeod, Olivia Meehan, Marianna Michałowska, Iryna Molodecky, Pınar Nuhoğlu Kibar, Paul Richter, Karen F. Tardrew, Rob Wilson and Rasa Žakevičiūtė.
With the view of improving doctoral education, contributors from diverse cultural, political and disciplinary contexts critically analyse challenges and opportunities that impact on the experience of researchers and university staff. Readers are invited to consider their own circumstances and how the presented policies, procedures, values and practices, both common and unique, might either detract from or enhance their performance and well-being. Reflection on lessons learned through the pandemic are incorporated, reinforcing the value of collaboration and mutual respect between researchers and their supporters at all levels, for both the conduct of good science and a fulfilled work life.

Contributors are: Britt-Marie Apelgren, Diogo Casanova, Pam Denicolo, Shane Dowle, Dawn Duke, Fabiane Garcia, Martin Gough, Erika Hansson, Gill Houston, Isabel Huet, Sverker Lindblad, Bing Lu, Alistair McCulloch, Marie-Louise Österlind, Julie Reeves, Manuela Schmidt, Matthew Sillence and Gun-Britt Wärvik.
Author: Gregory Bruno
As political tides shift and funding for college-in-prison programming ebbs and flows, educators who work in these contexts are often left with few resources for questioning their practice and their field. To that end, this book aims to encourage dialogue, to ask educators to interrogate their values, beliefs, and practices with and about college-in-prison programming and the students those programs serve. By consulting the works of Paulo Freire and Ernst Bloch, this text seeks to present a methodology for best designing and implementing a meaningful literacy pedagogy for incarcerated students at the nexus of social, political, and educational contexts.
Over the years, translation has increasingly become a necessary tool to function in contemporary society. Based on years of research and teaching activity within the field, this book offers a useful and effective paradigm for the translation of different types of texts, guiding readers towards the realisation of effective translation projects. The several contrastive analyses presented and the suggestions offered throughout will help readers appreciate the implications and consequences of every translation choice, encouraging them to develop reading and translating skills applicable to the variety of texts they face in everyday life, from novels to comic books, films, and television series.
Cross-National Perspectives on the Challenges and Management of Higher Education in Crisis Times
COVID-19 caused massive disruptions in the higher education sector across the world. The transition to online learning exposed the deep-rooted inequalities between countries, systems, institutions, and student groups in terms of the availability of information technology infrastructure, internet access and digital literacy, as well as prior training and experiences of faculty in online education. This volume explores various aspects of the impact of the pandemic on higher education management including how university administration responded to the crisis, and the role of local and national government agencies in academic support and higher education delivery. The key findings highlight the importance of better organisation and preparedness of higher education systems for future crises, and the need for a better dialogue between governments, higher education institutions and other stakeholders. The book calls for a collective response to address the digital divide among various groups and financial inequalities within and between the private and public universities, and to plan for the serious challenges that international students face during crisis situations.
Author: Pratik Chougule
The drive to promote American-style higher education is among the most longstanding and enduring features of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. Since its earliest engagements in the region, the U.S. government has looked to American universities to promote Washington’s interests and values. This book analyzes how American universities in the Middle East relate to U.S. foreign policy and how this relationship has evolved amid shifting U.S. priorities through two world wars, the Cold War, and the War on Terrorism. American Universities in the Middle East and U.S. Foreign Policy focuses on four sets of case studies: (1) The American University of Beirut; (2) The American University in Cairo; (3) American universities in Afghanistan and Iraq; and (4) Education City in Qatar.

At a time when policymakers are litigating core tenets of U.S. Middle East policy and new actors are entering the region’s higher education space, this book provides a resource to understand the geopolitical role of American universities in the Middle East.
Digitalisation, Quality and Trust in Higher Education
The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated change in the higher education sector across the globe and has required huge efforts and commitments on the political, institutional and individual level. During this period higher education was considered, maybe more than ever, as an essential sector. Providing critical information and, contributing to the delivery of scientifically based solutions to help societies overcome this global crisis, universities also simultaneously maintained core educational activities to secure the academic future of the next student generation. This required a high level of innovation, adaptivity and creativity. The book is centred on three main themes linked to transformation and change in higher education: digitalisation, quality and trust. The transformative power of the pandemic has raised concerns and questions of each of them.

Contributors are: Stephanie Albrecht, Tony Armstrong, Victoria Birmingham, Victor Borden, Bruno Broucker, Uwe Cantner, Helge Dauchert, Harry de Boer, Caterina Fox, Amanda French, Katharina Hölzle, Gunnar Grepperud, Seonmi Jin, Ben Jongbloed, Alex Kendall, Cindy Konen, René Krempkow, Anne-Kristin Langner, Theodor Leiber, Oddlaug Marie Lindgaard, Silke Masson, Clare Milsom, Jessica Nooij, Mark O’Hara, Matt O’Leary, Pascale Stephanie Petri, Rosalind Pritchard, Christopher Stolz, Elisabeth Suzen, Sara-I. Täger, Daniel Thiemann, Lieke van Berlo, Lotte J. van Dijk, Katy Vigurs, Tilo Wendler, and Tamara Zajontz.
Volume Editors: Julie Hansen and Ingela Nilsson
What does power abuse look and feel like in the academic world? How does it affect university faculty, students, education and research? What can we do to counteract and prevent power abuse? These questions are addressed in this collection of autobiographical poems, essays and illustrations about academia. The contributors reflect on individual experiences as well as underlying institutional structures, providing original perspectives on bullying, sexual harassment, discrimination, and other forms of power abuse in academic workplaces. They share their stories in order to break the culture of silence around power abuse in academia and point out pathways for constructive change.
Educational equity, inclusion, belonging, and justice are widely considered to be the most important civil rights challenge of the 21st century. Many HBCUs began in the 1800s as institutions to prepare Black teachers to teach in segregated America. Although their focus has expanded since their critical beginnings, HBCUs remain significant producers of African American teachers. Today, as the United States grapples with educational disparities, lack of diversity among education professionals, systemic racism, and the recent politically-inspired assaults on Critical Race Theory, we need HBCU leadership in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade education more than ever. Black College Leadership in PK–12 Education amplifies the research and perspectives of HBCU leaders, including four HBCU education deans, on how HBCUs help school districts optimize education for Black preschool, elementary and secondary students. Specific topics include HBCU teacher preparation, building HBCU and PK–12 partnerships, culturally responsive teaching, inclusive assessment practices, and HBCU leadership in STEM education. This book is ideal for school teachers and administrators who want to use HBCUs as a resource to improve education, as well as HBCU leaders who want to work more effectively with local school districts.
Series Editors: Michael A. Peters and Tina Besley
The knowledge, learning and creative economies manifest the changing significance of intellectual capital and the thickening connections between economic growth, knowledge and creativity. Increasingly economic and social activity is comprised by the ‘symbolic’ or ‘weightless’ economy with its iconic, immaterial and digital goods. This new digital knowledge economy includes new international labor that rely on developments in information and communication technologies (ICTs) that are changing the format, density and nature of the exchange and flows of knowledge, research and scholarship. Delivery modes in education are being reshaped. New global cultures of knowledge and research networks are spreading rapidly. New forms of openness and networking, cross-border people movement, flows of capital, portal cities and intensive development zones all are changing the conditions of imagining and producing and the sharing of creative work in different spheres. At the centre of is the economy/creativity nexus. But are education systems, institutions, assumptions and habits positioned and able so as to seize the opportunities and meet the challenges? This new series investigates all the aspects of education in (and as) the creative economy in order to extend the dialogue about the relationship between contemporary higher education and the changing face of contemporary economies.