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Selected Papers of Mark Olssen
Author: Mark Olssen
Inspired by the writings of Michel Foucault, Olssen’s writings traverse philosophy, politics, education, and epistemology. This book comprises a selection of his papers published in academic journals and books over twenty-five years. Taken as a whole, the papers represent a redirection of the core axioms and directions of western ontology and philosophy in relation to how history, the subject, and education are theorised within the western philosophical tradition. Olssen’s writings not only contain a powerful critique and revision of western liberalism from a poststructuralist perspective, they both explicate and extend Michel Foucault’s challenge to the core axioms and assumptions underpinning western thought. As Stephen Ball suggests in his Foreword to this volume, “Olssen uses Foucault to explore issues… Olssen’s Foucault is not a lonely nihilist but a troubled provocateur who encourages in us toward the political project of self-formation – our relation to ourselves and always, to others."
Author: J.E. Sumerau
Who am I? Where did I come from? What is a family? How do families of choice develop?

These questions permeate the pages of Scarecrow wherein a bisexual, nonbinary trans feminine person named Erin seeks to make sense of her life in relation to the places, people, and events she has seen and left behind over time. As the novel begins, Erin tells us that “39 funerals, 35 years, and too many lovers to bother remembering brought me to this point.” From this opening statement, Erin reflects on three-and-a-half decades of experiences growing up working class, white, and queer in the southeastern U.S.; navigating sexual, gender, classed, racial, and religious meanings and relationships; surviving varied types of love, trauma, kindness, and violence; and joining the upper-middle class world of the professoriate. As the novel progresses, she shows us how these experiences intertwine, create opportunities, and leave scars that together fashion who she has become over time and in relation to others.

Scarecrow could be utilized in the teaching of sociology, social psychology, Symbolic Interactionism, narrative, families, gender, sexualities, race, class, geography, biography, Southern Studies, LGBTQIA studies, trauma recovery, courses about aging and the life course, or of course, it could be read entirely for pleasure.
The world is changing at an extremely rapid pace, and with this our society, environment, economy and labour market. These multitudinous changes require innovation at different levels, not least from Higher Education which is confronted with increased demands to make its contribution and benefit to society more tangible, visible and sustainable. This book addresses such demands. It represents a rich selection of international contributions from academics, researchers, policymakers and practitioners, and a rich diversity of topics under the umbrella of sustainability. The book discusses how higher education needs to renew itself to maintain its core values while responding in a sustainable way to multiple crises, local demands and global needs, threats and opportunities.

Contributors are: Iyad Abualrub, Avril Margaret Brandon, Bruno Broucker, Lejo Buning, Cynthia Cogswell, Vanessa Cui, Kurt De Wit, Frans de Vijlder, Mervi Friman, Martina Gaisch, Anne Gannon, Caroline Hetherington, Ester Höhle, René Krempkow, Anne Laakso, Lotta Linko, Aleksandra Lis, Göran Melin, Clare Milsom, Matt O’Leary, Jason Pina, Rómulo Pinheiro, Ilana Pressick, Rosalind Pritchard, Victoria Rammer, Bairbre Redmond, Stephanie Reynolds, Lee Roberts, Radosław Rybkowski, Peter Schuur, Wafa Singh, Odd Rune Stalheim, Nathalie Turville and Nick White.
This book presents useful insights on the regeneration of curricula and pedagogies with a particular focus on universities in South Africa and Africa in general. Transformative Curricula, Pedagogies and Epistemologies: Teaching and Learning in Diverse Higher Education Contexts further explores the state of teaching and learning in different contexts, together with the emerging challenges and responsibilities that African higher education in the twenty first century is faced with. The analysis is put in light of the assumptions borrowed from the West, for Western epistemologies and pedagogies are still dominant. Instead, the book presents a case on the need for rethinking pedagogies and epistemologies within African higher education that include African culture, values, ethics, and indigenous knowledge. The new obligations of inclusive education, decolonisation, transformation, and academic and professional experiences are of paramount importance for contemporary higher education.

Valuable ideas about practices and policies in epistemological and pedagogical transformative mechanisms are discussed which can be used to inform a decolonised teaching and learning curriculum most suitable for an African higher education system. Above all, the book goes beyond mere narratives, as it explores decolonisation strategies suitable for transforming pedagogical and epistemological practices that include the education system as a whole.
L’écolâtre cathédral en France septentrionale du ixe au xiiie siècle
Author: Thierry Kouamé
This book traces the history of one of the central actors in the transformation of the Western educational system between the 9th and 13th centuries: the cathedral schoolmaster. Originally responsible for running the episcopal school, this ecclesiastical official eventually became a true school administrator with a territorial monopoly and coercive powers, including in particular issuing ‘licentia docendi’ to masters under his jurisdiction. Using a wide range of sources and taking in thirty-nine dioceses in northern France, the study analyses the construction of the office from the Carolingian period, the place of the schoolmaster within the canonical community and in feudal society, and the institutionalisation of his function with the Gregorian Reform and the birth of universities.
This book explores how narratives are deeply embodied, engaging heart, soul, as well as mind, through varying adult learner perspectives. Biographical research is not an isolated, individual, solipsistic endeavor but shaped by larger ecological interactions – in families, schools, universities, communities, societies, and networks – that can create or destroy hope.

Telling or listening to life stories celebrates complexity, messiness, and the rich potential of learning lives. The narratives in this book highlight the rapid disruption of sustainable ecologies, not only ‘natural’, physical, and biological, but also psychological, economic, relational, political, educational, cultural, and ethical. Yet, despite living in a precarious, and often frightening, liquid world, biographical research can both chronicle and illuminate how resources of hope are created in deeper, aesthetically satisfying ways. Biographical research offers insights, and even signposts, to understand and transcend the darker side of the human condition, alongside its inspirations.

Discourses, Dialogue and Diversity in Biographical Research aims to generate insight into people’s fears and anxieties but also their capacity to 'keep on keeping on' and to challenge forces that would diminish their and all our humanity. It provides a sustainable approach to creating sufficient hope in individuals and communities by showing how building meaningful dialogue, grounded in social justice, can create good enough experiences of togetherness across difference. The book illuminates what amounts to an ecology of life, learning and human flourishing in a sometimes tortured, fractious, fragmented, and fragile world, yet one still offering rich resources of hope.
Teaching English Literature, Sudan, 1951-1965
Letters from Khartoum is a partial biography of Scottish educator, D.R. Ewen, who taught English Literature at the University of Khartoum from the time of the Anglo-Egyptian Condominium through to Independence and the October 1964 Revolution. The administrative history of the then unified nation – North (Middle Eastern) and South (African) – makes the Sudan a unique setting to explore the workings of colonial education. The purpose of teaching English literature there was to remake the Muslim Sudanese of the North as the proxy agents of British culture who would administrate the first independent nation in Africa. But Ewen also was remade in the process – by his relationships with his students and colleagues, and by his own teaching innovations.
Developing Powerful Inclusive Narratives for Learning, Teaching, Research and Policy in Higher Education
Author: Sarah Hayes
This book challenges the notion that static principles of inclusive practice can be embedded and measured in Higher Education. It introduces the original concept of postdigital positionality as a dynamic lens through which inclusivity policies in universities might be reimagined. Much is written about Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) based on an assumption that such principles are already ‘established’ in educational institutions, to ensure fairness and opportunity for all. In this book, readers are asked: what does an airing cupboard have in common with ‘cancel culture’? This opens a provocative debate concerning the disconnect between EDI policy agendas and the widespread digitalisation of society. Written as Covid-19 has converged with existing political economic spaces of technology, culture, data and digital poverty, Postdigital Positionality calls for more ecologically sustainable inclusivity policies.
Volume Editor: Chris Brink
Around the world, higher education is faced with a fundamental question: what is the basis for our claim of societal legitimacy? In this book, the authors go beyond the classical response regarding teaching, research and community engagement. Instead, the editor puts forward the proposition that the answer lies in responsiveness, the extent to which universities respond, or fail to respond, to societal challenges. Moreover, because of its intractable legacy issues and crisis of inequality, the question regarding the societal legitimacy of universities is particularly clearly manifested in South Africa, one of the most unequal countries in the world.

The Responsive University brings together contributions on the issue of responsiveness from a number of international university leaders, half of them specifically addressing the South African situation within the context of the international situation as presented by the other authors.

In the global discussion about the role of universities in society, this book provides a conceptual framework for a way forward.
Historically, African higher education teaching and learning have relied on Western models, paradigms, assumptions, concepts and procedures, among other research related aspects. Western hegemony and ideology has influenced and continues to influence the epistemologies and both the methods and outcome of higher education research. The connection between teaching and learning is that teaching generates new forms of learning and learning challenges methods of teaching. Western claims to universality, objectivity and neutrality have dominated research paradigms in African higher education institutions to the detriment of alternative approaches and conceptions of knowledge. Methods aligned to African teaching and learning are often unrecognised and thus underutilised despite calls for the mantra for decolonial research methods. What are the African indigenous ways of teaching and learning? How are they related to the present African university? These puzzling questions provoke the minds of scholars on Africa to confront the discourse on decolonisation of higher education as they engage head-on and interrogate contemporary teaching and learning methods. Mediating Learning in Higher Education in Africa: From Critical Thinking to Social Justice Pedagogies provides critical reflections to some of the above questions that affect African Higher Education as it seeks to transform itself and provide directions for the future.