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With the view of improving doctoral education, contributors from diverse cultural, political and disciplinary contexts critically analyse challenges and opportunities that impact on the experience of researchers and university staff. Readers are invited to consider their own circumstances and how the presented policies, procedures, values and practices, both common and unique, might either detract from or enhance their performance and well-being. Reflection on lessons learned through the pandemic are incorporated, reinforcing the value of collaboration and mutual respect between researchers and their supporters at all levels, for both the conduct of good science and a fulfilled work life.

Contributors are: Britt-Marie Apelgren, Diogo Casanova, Pam Denicolo, Shane Dowle, Dawn Duke, Fabiane Garcia, Martin Gough, Erika Hansson, Gill Houston, Isabel Huet, Sverker Lindblad, Bing Lu, Alistair McCulloch, Marie-Louise Österlind, Julie Reeves, Manuela Schmidt, Matthew Sillence and Gun-Britt Wärvik.
Developing teacher education policies calls for a collaborative dialogue of teacher educators, student teachers, researchers, teachers, school heads and school boards, as well as policy makers at regional, national and European levels. The Teacher Education Policy in Europe Scientific Network (TEPE Network) focuses on improving the quality of teacher education in Europe. This aim is reached through careful comparison and analysis of teacher education practices in Europe, sharing of existing practices and outcomes of research on teacher education, and by discussing the implications of these outcomes for teacher education policies at faculty, institutional, regional, national and European level. Key Issues in Teacher Education: Policy, Research and Practice is a series of scholarly texts that inspires and facilitates this dialogue regarding teacher education as an ongoing process of professional development within the continuum of the teaching profession, from initial teacher education, through induction and on to continuing professional development throughout teacher careers. Such teacher education aims to support prospective, novice and experienced teachers to develop their professional capability in fostering the individual and collective learning needs of pupils and in creating and strengthening learning environments and school environments that are inclusive and democratic, that aim at equity and that are exemplary for an inclusive and democratic society. The coherence of the TEPE series is created by a common focus of each volume that is characterized by: • A comparative European (international) perspective cherishing diversity in perspectives and viewpoints; • Addressing the continuum of teacher education; • Bridging research, practice and policy; • With a focus on the implications for local, national or international policies, practices and research. Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the Series Editors, Maria Assunção Flores, Joanna Madalińska-Michalak, and Marco Snoek.
International organizations play an important role in the development of education around the world. Some have a direct impact on the rights of children and parents in education, while others have an indirect impact by addressing such issues as health, welfare or finance. Prominent among the most influential international organizations are the members of the United Nations family of agencies, although regional development banks and trade union organisations also play important roles. And no mention of international organizations would be complete without reference to the PISA programme of the OECD, although the OECD does much more in the field of education.

The Role of International Organizations in Education provides an introductory background to the operation of organisations that have had a direct and lasting impact on the implementation of educational policy in an international context. The accounts provided give researchers and practitioners to the field an initial account of the organizations, their development over the last seven decades, and their changing influence on the practice of education. By including voices from countries on the receiving end of international policies, the volume also introduces some of the debates that pervade in the field of international education.
There is a dire need today to create spaces in which people can make meaning of their existence in the world, abiding by cultural frameworks and practices that acknowledge and validate a meaningful existence for all. People are not just isolated individuals but are connected in diverse ways with other persons within our natural and social environment which is part of the whole universe. The African philosophy of uBuntu or humaneness is re-emerging for its timely relevance and potential as indispensable in our quest for global citizenship, peace, and mutual understanding in securing sustainable human development in the broader ecosystem.

Comparative educationists have the challenge to devise theoretical frameworks, epistemological and pedagogical constructs as well as pragmatic, useful and effective ways of promoting the virtues of compassion and recognition of our common humanity in eliminating the ills of domination and control that are guided by greed, hatred, jealousy, and intolerance.

Comparative Education for Global Citizenship, Peace and Shared Living through Ubuntu paves the way for a better understanding of the critical importance of the collective search and endeavor towards achieving the virtues of nonviolence, peace, shared values of living together, global citizenship, improved quality of life for all and a better appreciation of the positive implications of interdependence.
Author: David A. Turner
Comparative Education: A Field in Discussion is a personal reflection on the field of comparative education from the perspective of one scholar who has been active in the field since the 1980s. In the 1960s and 1970s many scholars attempted to develop a science of comparative education, and those diverse efforts formed the backdrop to the study of comparative education in the 1980s. In this volume, the author, who was originally educated as a physical scientist, draws upon those earlier attempts, at the same time introducing new insights from the complexity of science and systems theory.

David Turner argues that these new insights should lead us away from a positivist vision of science, largely based on nineteenth century ideas of scientific method, and challenge us to accept that concepts are fluid, change over time, and are frequently contested. Nonetheless, those same concepts are essential to the way that we think of ourselves, our environment and the institutions that we inhabit.

Caught between the generalisations that our concepts force on us, and our wish to capture the specificity of each personal history, the activity that we engage in is comparative education.
Series Editor: John C. Weidman
The aim of the series Pittsburgh Studies in Comparative and International Education (PSCIE) is to produce edited and authored volumes on key international education issues, trends, and reforms, including examinations of national education systems, social theories, and development education initiatives. Local, national, regional, and global volumes (single authored and edited collections) are welcomed and offer potential contributors a great deal of latitude based on interests and cutting edge research. The series is supported by a strong network of international scholars and development professionals who serve on the International Advisory Board and participate in the selection and review process for manuscript development. The volumes are intended to provide not only useful contributions to comparative, international, and development education (CIDE) but also possible supplementary readings for advanced courses for undergraduate and graduate students in CIDE.
In this book, Judith Norris presents a theoretical model that demonstrates a new approach to understanding how school leaders respond to conflicting expectations and demands. The idea of sensemaking and sensegiving is theoretically interesting and allows the reader to focus on how school leaders make sense, but also how they give sense to others in the complex conditions that educators now must negotiate. Like the Eucalyptus tree, educational leaders must adapt to their contradictory environments.

Written in the most accessible way, the theory and its application will likely appeal not only to researchers, but also to teachers and school administrators. Norris has created a real applicability to school leadership in various international contexts.
Stories of Pathways to Teaching
Author: Edward R. Howe
This book evolved from decades of transcultural experiences. Edward Howe’s comparative ethnographic narrative, a blend of narrative inquiry and reflexive ethnography, uniquely captures the essence of teacher acculturation. Each chapter is filled with intriguing teachers’ stories based on lived experiences – connected through the common thread of learning to teach. Compelling teacher narratives, spanning seven decades, show that much of what teachers do is learned implicitly and is culturally embedded.
Teacher Acculturation provides a window into the world of novice teachers from the 1950s through present day. The thought-provoking stories provide a springboard for critical discussions about gender/sexuality, culture/race/ethnicity, Indigenous perspectives, SES/class/religion, location/space/time, and the challenges facing teachers in different contexts.
The author highlights the importance of teacher relationships, built on mutual understanding, trust, mentorship, leadership and guidance. Beginning teachers are largely required to work in isolation, to learn their practice through trial and error – left to “sink or swim.” There is little provision for mentorship and insufficient time to reflect on teaching practices. Collaborative and reflective self-study, as illustrated in Teacher Acculturation, shows great promise to ameliorate this pervasive problem in teacher induction. Thus, the book will appeal to teacher educators, teachers and to anyone interested in the fascinating lives of teachers.
Volume Editors: Huajun Zhang and Jim Garrison
This book celebrates the centennial of Dewey’s visit to China (1919–1921). Reflecting on the history of Dewey’s visit is critical to understanding China’s modernization and to reevaluating the early efforts of the radical intellectuals in the May Fourth Movement (1919), some of whom were Dewey’s students at Columbia University. This study also helps us to critically reflect on the China-US relationship for our contemporary world. The historical, philosophical and comparative perspectives applied in this book may shed light on current conflicts. Dewey’s thoughts were well-received by different scholars but also misperceived or misinterpreted in different historical periods. This project tries to understand the challenges of both cultures (Chinese and Western) by using this historical episode as a distant mirror to better perceive and understand the present.

By reviewing this historical event, we also find new space to reinterpret Eastern philosophies such as Confucianism and Buddhism. We find that there’s some surprising commonalities shared by Confucianism, Buddhism, and Deweyan pragmatism that provide possibilities for seeking a more inclusive conceptual framework for education in the West as well as the East.
Collaborative engagement between activist academics from Israel and Northern Ireland highlighted the challenges and potential of working through education to promote shared learning and shared life in divided societies. Following these initial explorations, the volume brought together educationalists from Europe, the United States and South Africa to widen the range of experience and insights, and broaden the base of the conversation. The result is this book on the role of shared education, not only in deeply divided societies, but also in places where minorities face discrimination, where migrants face prejudice and barriers, or where society fails to deal positively with cultural diversity. Together, the contributors challenged themselves to develop theoretical and practical paradigms, based on practical knowledge and experience, to promote activist pedagogies. Their shared purpose was to work for more humane, just and democratic societies, in which education offers genuine hope for sustained transformational change.

The four main themes around which the book is organized are: educating for democratic-multicultural citizenship, models of shared learning, nurturing intercultural competencies, and reconciling dialogue in the face of conflicting narratives. The book draws on a wide range of international perspectives and insights to identify practical strategies for change in local contexts.