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The Gold and the Dross

Althusser for Educators

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David I. Backer

In the last decade, there has been an international resurgence of interest in the philosophy of Louis Althusser. New essays, journalism, collections, secondary literature, and even manuscripts by Althusser himself are emerging, speaking in fresh ways to audiences of theorists and activists. Althusser is especially important in educational thought, as he famously claimed that school is the most impactful ideological state apparatus in modern society. This insight inspired a generation of educational researchers, but Althusser’s philosophy—unique in a number of ways, one of which was its emphasis on education—largely lost popularity.

Despite this resurgence of interest, and while Althusser’s philosophy is important for educators and activists to know about, it remains difficult to understand. The Gold and the Dross: Althusser for Educators, with succinct prose and a creative organization, introduces readers to Althusser’s thinking. Intended for those who have never encountered Althusser’s theory before, and even those who are new to philosophy and critical theory in general, the book elaborates the basic tenets of Althusser’s philosophy using examples and personal stories juxtaposed with selected passages of Althusser’s writing. Starting with a beginner’s guide to interpellation and Althusser’s concept of ideology, the book continues by elaborating the epistemology and ontology Althusser produced, and concludes with his concepts of society and science. The Gold and the Dross makes Althusser’s philosophy more available to contemporary audiences of educators and activists.
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Edited by William M. Reynolds and Brad Porfilio

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Edited by Dianne Siemon, Tasos Barkatsas and Rebecca Seah

The relationship between research and practice has long been an area of interest for researchers, policy makers, and practitioners alike. One obvious arena where mathematics education research can contribute to practice is the design and implementation of school mathematics curricula. This observation holds whether we are talking about curriculum as a set of broad, measurable competencies (i.e., standards) or as a comprehensive set of resources for teaching and learning mathematics. Impacting practice in this way requires fine-grained research that is focused on individual student learning trajectories and intimate analyses of classroom pedagogical practices as well as large-scale research that explores how student populations typically engage with the big ideas of mathematics over time. Both types of research provide an empirical basis for identifying what aspects of mathematics are important and how they develop over time.

This book has its origins in independent but parallel work in Australia and the United States over the last 10 to 15 years. It was prompted by a research seminar at the 2017 PME Conference in Singapore that brought the contributors to this volume together to consider the development and use of evidence-based learning progressions/trajectories in mathematics education, their basis in theory, their focus and scale, and the methods used to identify and validate them. In this volume they elaborate on their work to consider what is meant by learning progressions/trajectories and explore a range of issues associated with their development, implementation, evaluation, and on-going review. Implications for curriculum design and future research in this field are also considered.

Contributors are: Michael Askew, Tasos Barkatsas, Michael Belcher, Rosemary Callingham, Doug Clements, Jere Confrey, Lorraine Day, Margaret Hennessey, Marj Horne, Alan Maloney, William McGowan, Greg Oates, Claudia Orellana, Julie Sarama, Rebecca Seah, Meetal Shah, Dianne Siemon, Max Stephens, Ron Tzur, and Jane Watson.
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Yvette V. Lapayese

In every corner of the world, children are learning languages at home that differ from the dominant language used in their broader social world. These children arrive at school with a precious resource: their mother tongue. In the face of this resource and the possibility for biliteracy, majority language educational programs do nothing to support primary language competence. To counter monolingual education, there are significant albeit few initiatives around the world that provide formal support for children to continue to develop competence in their mother tongue, while also learning an additional language or languages. One such initiative is dual language immersion education (DLI).

Interestingly, most (if not all) research on DLI programs focus on the effectiveness of bilingual education vis-à-vis academic access and achievement. The ideologies embedded in the research and guidelines for DLI education, albeit necessary and critical during the early days of DLI schooling, are disconnected from the present realities, epistemologies, and humanness of our bilingual youth.

A Humanizing Dual Language Immersion Education envisions a framework informed by bilingual teachers and students who support biliteracy as a human right. Positioning bilingual education under a human rights framework addresses the basic right of our bi/multilingual youth to human dignity. Respect for the languages of persons belonging to different linguistic communities is essential for a just and democratic society. Given the centrality of language to our sense of who we are and where we fit in the broader world, a connection between linguistic human rights and bilingual education is essential.
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International Trends in Educational Assessment

Emerging Issues and Practices

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Edited by Myint Swe Khine

Assessment and evaluation have always been an integral part of the educational process. Quality and purposeful assessment can assist in students’ learning and their achievement. In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the roles of educational measurement, evaluation, and assessment with a view to improving the education systems throughout the world. Educators are interested in how to adequately prepare the young generation to meet the ever-growing demands of the 21st century utilizing robust assessment methods. There has also been increased demand in accountability and outcomes assessment in schools to bridge the gap between classroom practices and measurement and assessment of learners’ performance. This volume contains selected and invited papers from the First International Conference on Educational Measurement, Evaluation and Assessment (ICEMEA).

Contributors are: Peter Adams, Derin Atay, Nafisa Awwal, Helen Barefoot, Patrick Griffin, Bahar Hasirci, Didem Karakuzular, Don Klinger, Leigh Powell, Vicente Reyes, Mark Russell, Charlene Tan, Bryan Taylor, and Zhang Quan.
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People with Intellectual Disability Experiencing University Life

Theoretical Underpinnings, Evidence and Lived Experience

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Edited by Patricia O’Brien, Michelle L. Bonati, Friederike Gadow and Roger Slee

This book will introduce the reader to international perspectives associated with post-secondary school education for students with intellectual disability attending university settings. Examples of students with intellectual disability gaining their right to full inclusion within university settings are outlined as well as the barriers and facilitators of such innovation. The four parts of the text will act as a reader for all stakeholders of inclusion at the university level. The first part examines the philosophical, theoretical and rights based framework of inclusion. The second part provides evidence and insight into eight programmes from across the globe where students with intellectual disability are included within university settings. The third part consists of six chapters associated with the lived experiences of stakeholders in the programs profiled in section two. These stories are represented through the voices of former students of inclusive tertiary education initiatives, parents of adult children with intellectual disability who have participated in tertiary education, and lecturers who have taught students with intellectual disability as members of their courses. In the fourth part, critical issues examined including the role of secondary school counsellors, sustaining post university outcomes, transition from university to employment, inclusive university teaching approaches, and decision-making approaches to successfully implement a tertiary education initiative. The text concludes with a synthesis of the book themes and proposes calls to action with specific tasks to move the rhetoric of human rights into reality for adults with intellectual disability through an inclusive tertiary education.
Contributors are: Kristín Björnsdóttir, Michelle L Bonati, Bruce Chapman, Amy L. Cook, Deborah Espiner, Friederike Gadow, Meg Grigal, Debra Hart, Laura Hayden, Anne Hughson, John Kubiak, Niamh Lally, Lorraine Lindsay, Jemima MacDonald, Kathleen J. Marshall, Kerri-ann Messenger, Lumene Montissol, Ray Murray, John O’Brien, Patricia O’Brien, Barrie O’Connor, Molly O’Keeffe, Clare Papay, Anthony J. Plotner , Parimala Raghavendra, Fiona Rillotta, Michael Shevlin , Roger Slee, Natasha A. Spassiani , Guðrún V. Stefánsdóttir, Josh Stenberg, Kimberley Teasley, Lorraine Towers, Margaret Turley, Bruce Uditsky, Chelsea VanHorn Stinnett, Stephanie Walker, Thea Werkoven, Felicia L. Wilczenski.
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Living a Motivated Life

A Memoir and Activities

Raymond J. Wlodkowski

What if, as psychologists and adult educators advocate, a person chose a life where his motivation for the work itself determined what he did? Living a Motivated Life: A Memoir and Activities follows the author through forty years, revealing how he selected vocational pursuits guided by his understanding of intrinsic motivation and transformative learning. As a compass for relevant decisions, these ideas gave energy and purpose to how he lived, and an instinct as sure as sight for the future.

Written with nuance, humor, and unpredictability, this story renders how he came to appreciate learning for the pleasure of learning. Facing similar challenges as those of today’s first generation college students, the memoir narrates his unexpected college enrollment, his friendship with an ancient history professor, and his triumphs and travails as teacher, psychologist, human relations specialist, psychotherapist, and adult educator.

This is the first memoir of someone who consciously chose to lead a professional life to experience flow on a daily basis. It is an important step in the integration and evolution of intrinsic motivation theory and transformative learning. But it reaches beyond this outcome, sharing how the author aspired to be better at what he valued and showing how he discovered and extended these ideas to others.
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Edited by Annie Guerin and Trish McMenamin

In Belonging: Rethinking Inclusive Practices to Support Well-Being and Identity, issues related to inclusive education and belonging across a range of education contexts from early childhood to tertiary education are examined and matters related to participation, policy and theory, and identity and well-being are explored. Individual chapters, which are drawn from papers presented at The Inclusive Education Summit held at the University of Canterbury, 2016, canvass a variety of topics including pedagogy, sexuality, theory, policy and practice. These topics are explored from the authors’ varying perspectives as practitioners, academics and lay-persons and also from varying international perspectives including New Zealand, South Africa and Australia.

Contributors are: Keith Ballard, Henrietta Bollinger, Hera Cook, Michael Gafffney, Annie Guerin, Fiona Henderson, Leechin Heng, Kate McAnelly, Trish McMenamin, Be Pannell, Christine Rietveld, Marie Turner, Ben Whitburn, Julie White, and Melanie Wong.
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Thirty Years of Learning Environments

Looking Back and Looking Forward

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Edited by David B. Zandvliet and Barry Fraser

This volume is a commemorative book celebrating the 30th Anniversary of the Special Interest Group (SIG) on Learning Environments of the American Educational Researchers’ Association. It includes a historical perspective starting with the formation of the SIG in 1984 and the first program space at the AERA annual meeting in 1985 in Chicago. This retrospective notes other landmarks in the development of the SIG such as the creation of the international journal Learning Environments Research.

The study of learning environments was first conceptualized around the need to develop perceptual and psychosocial measures for describing students’ individual or shared educational experiences (e.g. ‘feel of the class’ or ‘classroom climate’). Over the ensuing decades, the field expanded considerably from its early roots in science education to describe other phenomenon such as teacher-student interpersonal relationships, or applications in pre-service teacher education and action research.

The book also describes several new areas of promise for the expanding field of learning environments research that in the future will include more diverse contexts and applications. These will include new contexts but established research programs in areas such as information and communications technology and environmental education, but also in emerging research contexts such as the physical classroom environment and links among learning environment contexts and students’ emotional health and well-being.

Contributors are: Perry den Brok, Rosie Dhaliwhal, Barry J. Fraser, Catherine Martin-Dunlop, David Henderson, Melissa Loh, Tim Mainhardt, George Sirrakos, Alisa Stanton, Theo Wubbels, and David B. Zandvliet.
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Edited by Maryam Azarnoosh, Mitra Zeraatpishe, Akram Faravani and Hamid Reza Kargozari

Issues in Coursebook Evaluation takes a theory to practice approach with emphasis on theoretical underpinnings that lead into practical aspects of the processes of evaluating English language coursebooks. The ten reader-friendly chapters contributed by outstanding scholars cover fundamental concepts in book evaluation which turn this work to a valuable resource book in applied linguistics. The topics covered include the need to evaluate books (why, who, how and when), language learners’ needs, evaluating language and content of coursebooks, evaluating teaching aids, intercultural and socio-cultural perspectives in coursebooks and their evaluation, how to evaluate the authenticity of conversations in ESL textbooks, evaluating ESP textbooks, e-textbook evaluation, and the influence of research on materials evaluation.

Contributors are: Maryam Azarnoosh, Saleh Al-Busaidi, Darío Luis Banegas, Martin Cortazzi, Akram Faravani, Lixian Jin, Hamid Reza Kargozari, Mahboobeh Khosrojerdi, Thom Kiddle, Jayakaran Mukundan, Vahid Nimehchisalem, Golnaz Peyvandi, Seyed Ali Rezvani Kalajahi, Carlos Rico-Troncoso, Lilia Savova, Abdolvahed Zarifi, and Mitra Zeraatpishe.