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Volume Editors: Annica Andersson and Richard Barwell
There is no shortage of urgent, complex problems that mathematics education can and should engage with. Pandemics, forest fires, pollution, Black Lives Matter protests, and fake news all involve mathematics, are matters of life and death, have a clear political dimension, and are interdisciplinary in nature. They demand a critical approach. The authors in this volume showcase new insights, teaching ideas and new and unique ways of applying critical mathematics education, in areas as diverse as climate change, obesity, decolonisation and ethnomathematics. This book demonstrates that there is plenty to be done with critical mathematics education.

Contributors are: Annica Andersson, Tonya Gau Bartell, Richard Barwell, Lisa Lunney Borden, Sunghwan Byun, Anna Chronaki, Brian Greer, Jennifer Hall, Victoria Hand, Kjellrun Hiis Hauge, Beth Herbel-Eisenmann, Rune Herheim, Courtney Koestler, Kate le Roux, Swapna Mukhopadhyay, Aldo Parra, Anita Rampal, Sheena Rughubar-Reddy, Toril Eskeland Rangnes, Ulrika Ryan, Lisa Steffensen, Paola Valero and David Wagner.
Key Terms and Concepts in Teaching and Learning
Series Editor: William F. McComas
This series features short handbooks focusing on the special language used in a wide variety of educational disciplines ranging from science education to educational leadership. Possessing an understanding of the unique vocabulary within a scholarly domain is vital to foster shared communication for those who wish to understand a discipline and even more important for those who wish to contribute to it. This is particularly true for those new to the academic language of a particular educational arena. Each book in the series may be seen as a set of very short stories introducing a particular discipline in education.

The featured terms in each volume have been selected for their relevance and their potential to be defined uniquely within a particular educational field. The key terms are discussed on one page with a brief introductory definition for quick reference followed by a longer, expanded discussion supported by references. The index in each book includes links encouraging readers to explore related terms and concepts and thus gain additional information and context.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the Acquisitions Editor, Evelien van der Veer.
Volume Editors: Bronislaw Czarnocha and William Baker
Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education introduces bisociation, the theory of Aha! moment creativity into mathematics education. It establishes relationships between Koestler’s bisociation theory and constructivist learning theories. It lays down the basis for a new theory integrating creativity with learning to describe moments of insight at different levels of student development. The collection illuminates the creativity of the eureka experience in mathematics through different lenses of affect, cognition and conation, theory of attention and constructivist theories of learning, neuroscience and computer creativity. Since Aha! is a common human experience, the book proposes bisociation as the basis of creativity for all. It discusses how to facilitate and assess Aha! creativity in mathematics classrooms.

Contributors are: William Baker, Stephen Campbell, Bronislaw Czarnocha, Olen Dias, Gerald Goldin, Peter Liljedahl, John Mason, Benjamin Rott, Edme Soho, Hector Soto, Hannes Stoppel, David Tall, Ron Tzur and Laurel Wolf.
A Vygotskian Perspective on Knowing and Becoming in Mathematics Teaching and Learning
Author: Luis Radford
The Theory of Objectification: A Vygotskian Perspective on Knowing and Becoming in Mathematics Teaching and Learning presents a new educational theory in which learning is considered a cultural-historical collective process. The theory moves away from current conceptions of learning that focus on the construction or acquisition of conceptual contents. Its starting point is that schools do not produce only knowledge; they produce subjectivities too. As a result, learning is conceptualised as a process that is about knowing and becoming.

Drawing on the work of Vygotsky and Freire, the theory of objectification offers a perspective to transform classrooms into sites of communal life where students make the experience of an ethics of solidarity, responsibility, plurality, and inclusivity. It posits the goal of education in general, and mathematics education in particular, as a political, societal, historical, and cultural endeavour aimed at the dialectical creation of reflexive and ethical subjects who critically position themselves in historically and culturally constituted mathematical discourses and practices, and who ponder new possibilities of action and thinking. The book is of special interest to educators in general and mathematics educators in particular, as well as to graduate and undergraduate students.
Series Editors: Adalira Saénz-Ludlow and Luis Radford
This series is dedicated to the diversity of semiotic perspectives that, directly or indirectly, influence the learning and the teaching of mathematics.
Editor: Olive Chapman
This second edition of the International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education builds on and extends the first edition (2008) in addressing the knowledge, teaching and learning of mathematics teachers at all levels of teaching mathematics and of mathematics teacher educators, and the approaches/activities and programmes through which their learning can be supported. It consists of four volumes based on the same themes as the first edition.

VOLUME 1:
Knowledge, Beliefs, and Identity in Mathematics Teaching and Teaching Development
Despina Potari, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece and Olive Chapman, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada (eds.)

This volume addresses the “what” of mathematics teacher education. Authors attend to knowledge for mathematics teaching, teaching development, teacher beliefs and identity, and relationships among them. As well as synthesizing research and practice over various dimensions of these areas of teacher education, the volume offers valuable insights on best practice for teacher educators and researchers, university decision makers, and those involved in systemic policy development on teacher education.
paperback: 978-90-04-41886-8, hardback: 978-90-04-41885-1, ebook: 978-90-04-41887-5

VOLUME 2:
Tools and Processes in Mathematics Teacher Education
Salvador Llinares, University of Alicante, Alicante, Spain and Olive Chapman, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada (eds.)

This volume addresses the “how” of mathematics teacher education. Authors share their invaluable experience in employing different tools from a variety of perspectives in mathematics teacher education. This accumulated experience will assist teacher educators, researchers in mathematics education and those involved in policy decisions on teacher education and professional development in making decisions about both the tools and the processes to be used for various purposes in mathematics teacher education.
paperback: 978-90-04-41897-4, hardback: 978-90-04-41895-0,ebook: 978-90-04-41896-7

VOLUME 3:
Participants in Mathematics Teacher Education
Gwendolyn M. Lloyd, Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania, USA and Olive Chapman, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada (eds.)

This volume addresses the “who” of mathematics teacher education. Authors focus on the development of participants in mathematics teacher education through diverse professional learning opportunities in schools, universities, and community settings. They consider prospective and practising teachers as well as teacher educators and researchers as learners and explore how particular collaborations and contexts offer support for participants’ learning. The volume offers valuable insights into how these participants work together within and across boundaries and contexts for mathematics teacher education to generate rich opportunities for professional development.
paperback: 978-90-04-41922-3, hardback: 978-90-04-41921-6, ebook: 978-90-04-41923-0

VOLUME 4:
The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional
Kim Beswick, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia and Olive Chapman, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada (eds.)

This volume addresses the “what”, “how” and “who” of mathematics teacher educator education. Authors attend to knowledge, learning, and roles of teacher educators working with teachers in teacher education processes and practices. They share practical, professional and theoretical perspectives of different approaches/activities and programmes that can support mathematics teacher educator learning to promote effective teacher education practice, with valuable implications for future research.
paperback: 978-90-04-42420-3, hardback: 978-90-04-42419-7, ebook: 978-90-04-42421-0
Editor: Olive Chapman
This second edition of the International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education builds on and extends the first edition (2008) in addressing the knowledge, teaching and learning of mathematics teachers at all levels of teaching mathematics and of mathematics teacher educators, and the approaches/activities and programmes through which their learning can be supported. It consists of four volumes based on the same themes as the first edition.

VOLUME 1:
Knowledge, Beliefs, and Identity in Mathematics Teaching and Teaching Development
Despina Potari, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece and Olive Chapman, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada (eds.)

This volume addresses the “what” of mathematics teacher education. Authors attend to knowledge for mathematics teaching, teaching development, teacher beliefs and identity, and relationships among them. As well as synthesizing research and practice over various dimensions of these areas of teacher education, the volume offers valuable insights on best practice for teacher educators and researchers, university decision makers, and those involved in systemic policy development on teacher education.
paperback: 978-90-04-41886-8, hardback: 978-90-04-41885-1, ebook: 978-90-04-41887-5

VOLUME 2:
Tools and Processes in Mathematics Teacher Education
Salvador Llinares, University of Alicante, Alicante, Spain and Olive Chapman, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada (eds.)

This volume addresses the “how” of mathematics teacher education. Authors share their invaluable experience in employing different tools from a variety of perspectives in mathematics teacher education. This accumulated experience will assist teacher educators, researchers in mathematics education and those involved in policy decisions on teacher education and professional development in making decisions about both the tools and the processes to be used for various purposes in mathematics teacher education.
paperback: 978-90-04-41897-4, hardback: 978-90-04-41895-0,ebook: 978-90-04-41896-7

VOLUME 3:
Participants in Mathematics Teacher Education
Gwendolyn M. Lloyd, Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania, USA and Olive Chapman, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada (eds.)

This volume addresses the “who” of mathematics teacher education. Authors focus on the development of participants in mathematics teacher education through diverse professional learning opportunities in schools, universities, and community settings. They consider prospective and practising teachers as well as teacher educators and researchers as learners and explore how particular collaborations and contexts offer support for participants’ learning. The volume offers valuable insights into how these participants work together within and across boundaries and contexts for mathematics teacher education to generate rich opportunities for professional development.
paperback: 978-90-04-41922-3, hardback: 978-90-04-41921-6, ebook: 978-90-04-41923-0

VOLUME 4:
The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional
Kim Beswick, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia and Olive Chapman, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada (eds.)

This volume addresses the “what”, “how” and “who” of mathematics teacher educator education. Authors attend to knowledge, learning, and roles of teacher educators working with teachers in teacher education processes and practices. They share practical, professional and theoretical perspectives of different approaches/activities and programmes that can support mathematics teacher educator learning to promote effective teacher education practice, with valuable implications for future research.
paperback: 978-90-04-42420-3, hardback: 978-90-04-42419-7, ebook: 978-90-04-42421-0
Advance Student-Scientist Partnerships beyond the Status Quo
Author: Pei-Ling Hsu
Working with scientists has been suggested as a powerful activity that can stimulate students’ interest and career aspirations in science. However, how to address challenges of power-over issues and communication barriers in youth-scientist partnerships? In Youths’ Cogenerative Dialogues with Scientists, the author describes a pioneering study to improve internship communications between youth and scientists through cogenerative dialogues. The findings show that cogenerative dialogues can help youth and scientists recognize, express, and manage their challenges and emotions as they arise in their internships. As a result, cogenerative dialogues help youth and scientists work productively as a team and enhance their social boding. Suggestions are also provided for science educators to design more innovative and effective projects for future youth-scientist partnerships.
The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional (Second Edition)
Volume Editors: Kim Beswick and Olive Chapman
This second edition of the International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education builds on and extends the topics/ideas in the first edition while maintaining the themes for each of the volumes. Collectively, the authors looked back beyond and within the last 10 years to establish the state-of-the-art and continuing and new trends in mathematics teacher and mathematics teacher educator education, and looked forward regarding possible avenues for teachers, teacher educators, researchers, and policy makers to consider to enhance and/or further investigate mathematics teacher and teacher educator learning and practice, in particular. The volume editors provide introductions to each volume that highlight the subthemes used to group related chapters, which offer meaningful lenses to see important connections within and across chapters. Readers can also use these subthemes to make connections across the four volumes, which, although presented separately, include topics that have relevance across them since they are all situated in the common focus regarding mathematics teachers.

Volume 4, The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional, focuses on the professionalization of mathematics teacher educators, which, since the first Handbook, continues to grow as an important area for investigation and development. It addresses teacher educators’ knowledge, learning and practice with teachers/instructors of mathematics. Thus, as the fourth volume in the series, it appropriately attends to those who hold central roles in mathematics teacher education to provide an excellent culmination to the handbook.

The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional (Second Edition)
Volume Editors: Kim Beswick and Olive Chapman
This second edition of the International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education builds on and extends the topics/ideas in the first edition while maintaining the themes for each of the volumes. Collectively, the authors looked back beyond and within the last 10 years to establish the state-of-the-art and continuing and new trends in mathematics teacher and mathematics teacher educator education, and looked forward regarding possible avenues for teachers, teacher educators, researchers, and policy makers to consider to enhance and/or further investigate mathematics teacher and teacher educator learning and practice, in particular. The volume editors provide introductions to each volume that highlight the subthemes used to group related chapters, which offer meaningful lenses to see important connections within and across chapters. Readers can also use these subthemes to make connections across the four volumes, which, although presented separately, include topics that have relevance across them since they are all situated in the common focus regarding mathematics teachers.

Volume 4, The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional, focuses on the professionalization of mathematics teacher educators, which, since the first Handbook, continues to grow as an important area for investigation and development. It addresses teacher educators’ knowledge, learning and practice with teachers/instructors of mathematics. Thus, as the fourth volume in the series, it appropriately attends to those who hold central roles in mathematics teacher education to provide an excellent culmination to the handbook.