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Series Editors: Alister Jones and Cathy Buntting
The Biotechnology Learning Series is aimed to bring about discussion around the introduction of biotechnology in schools and tertiary learning environments. Biotechnology is an expanding area of scientific and community interest, one that it is important students understand because of its potential to impact on them and their communities. The development of scientifically and technologically literate citizens has been almost universally welcomed as a desirable goal for education and the introduction of biotechnology in schools can contribute to this. This series will include publications on communicating biotechnology, linking schools, industry and research, case studies of classroom research in introducing biotechnology, bioethics, futures and critical thinking in biotechnology. Although the context for the series is specifically biotechnology the publications will be useful to science and technology educators internationally. The Biotechnology Learning Series arose from research and development work for The New Zealand Biotechnology Learning Hub. The Hub was developed to make modern biotechnology more accessible to school teachers and students. The issue for teachers and science and technology educators is how to provide learning experiences in this area. The Hub funded by the New Zealand Government consists primarily of an on-line portal ( www.biotechlearn.org.nz) containing case studies and resources of biotechnology in action alongside teacher resources that demonstrate how biotechnology contexts can be transferred into a classroom setting to contribute to teacher and student scientific and technological literacy. The editors of the series encourage proposals from researchers in science and technology education.
Key Terms and Concepts in Teaching and Learning
Series Editor: William F. McComas
This series features short handbooks focusing on the special language used in a wide variety of educational disciplines ranging from science education to educational leadership. Possessing an understanding of the unique vocabulary within a scholarly domain is vital to foster shared communication for those who wish to understand a discipline and even more important for those who wish to contribute to it. This is particularly true for those new to the academic language of a particular educational arena. Each book in the series may be seen as a set of very short stories introducing a particular discipline in education.

The featured terms in each volume have been selected for their relevance and their potential to be defined uniquely within a particular educational field. The key terms are discussed on one page with a brief introductory definition for quick reference followed by a longer, expanded discussion supported by references. The index in each book includes links encouraging readers to explore related terms and concepts and thus gain additional information and context.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the Acquisitions Editor, Evelien van der Veer.
Learning concepts is a real challenge for learners because of the abstract nature of concepts. This holds particularly true for concepts in science and technology education where learning concepts by doing design activities is potentially a powerful way to overcome that learning barrier. Much depends, however, on the role of the teacher.

Design-Based Concept Learning in Science and Technology Education brings together contributions from researchers that have investigated what conditions need to be fulfilled to make design-based education work. The chapters contain studies from a variety of topics and concepts in science and technology education. So far, studies on design-based learning have been published in a variety of journals, but never before were the outcomes of those studies brought together in one volume. Now an overview of insights about design-based concept learning is presented with expectations about future directions and trends.
Volume Editors: Nasser Mansour and Heba EL-Deghaidy
This book presents an international perspective of the influence of cultural issues on STEM reform. Effective STEM education is of considerable importance internationally because there is increase pressure by governments to produce technically skilled people from the compulsory education sectors; people capable of participating actively in the so-called’ knowledge economy’ or knowledge society. An important and distinguishing feature of the book is that it draws upon the empirical experiences and research of the local experts from an extremely diverse cohort across the world.

Contributors are: Nayif Awad, David Barlex, Alexandra Bazdar, Saouma BouJaoude, Heba EL-Deghaidy, Marwa Eltanahy, Sibel Erduran, Sufian Forawi, Clare Gartland, Lilia Halim, Ying-Shao Hsu, Zanaton Haji Iksan, Deena Khalil, Meredith Kier, Nasser Mansour, Mohamad Sattar Rasul, Seema Rivera, Dalene Swanson, Paige Teamey, Tuan Mastura Tuan Soh, Russell Tytler, Noël Williams and Yi-Fen Yeh.
Volume Editors: Kenneth Tobin and Konstantinos Alexakos
Doing Authentic Inquiry to Improve Learning and Teaching consists of 18 chapters, and 19 authors from 4 countries. The book is suited for use by educators, researchers and classroom practitioners involved in teaching and learning, teacher education, and policy. All chapters are grounded in urban contexts, but are broadly applicable. Multilogical research highlights uses of sociocultural theory, authentic, event-oriented, interpretive inquiry, narrative, and willingness to learn from difference. Methodologies are historically constituted, emergent, contingent, and participatory, embracing collaborative, and contemplative practices, and value of many voices and diverse meaning systems. Readers experience research that is potentially both personally and professionally transformative and applicable to today’s challenges.

Contributors are: Jennifer D. Adams, Konstantinos Alexakos, Arnau Amat, Marissa E. Bellino, Mitch Bleier, Corinna Yolanda Brathwaite, Olga Calderon, Katelin Corbett, Amy DeFelice, Gene Fellner, Helen Kwah, Manny Lopez, Anna Malyukova, Kate E. O'Hara, Malgorzata Powietrzyńska, Isabel Sellas, Kenneth Tobin, and Yau Yan Wong.
The educational world is experiencing exciting yet tension-filled times. We all wish to strengthen and support creativity and creative teaching in schools. Yet recent debates about what “creativity” means, and how it should be implemented, raise the need for more specific approaches. Write a Science Opera (WASO) is one such approach. WASO is a transdisciplinary, inquiry-based approach to teaching at the intersection of art and science in schools. It is all about creative teaching and teaching for creativity.

Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guidebook to Writing a Science Opera provides teachers with the reasons for, and advantages of, introducing pupils of all ages to WASO. It provides step-by-step instructions for how to implement WASO in classrooms. WASO is challenging, but the rewards are powerful: In WASO, it is the pupils’ curiosity and creative imagination which develop their science and art curriculum.

Get ready for an exciting, creative journey …
Volume Editors: Nagla Ali and Myint Swe Khine
Three dimensional or 3D printing technology is a process of making three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. Currently, low cost and affordable 3D printers enable teachers, schools, and higher education institutions to make 3D printing a part of the curriculum. Integrating 3D printing into the curriculum provides an opportunity for students to collaboratively discuss, design, and create 3D objects. The literature reveals that there are numerous advantages of integrating 3D printing into teaching and learning. Educators recommend that 3D printing should be introduced to the students at a young age to teach STEM concepts, develop creativity and engage in team work – essential skills for the 21st century work force.

This edited volume documents recent attempts to integrate 3D printing into the curriculum in schools and universities and research on its efficacies and usefulness from the practitioners' perspectives. It unveils the exemplary works by educators and researchers in the field highlighting the current trends, theoretical and practical aspects of 3D printing in teaching and learning.

Contributors are: Waleed K. Ahmed, Issah M. Alhamad, Hayder Z. Ali, Nagla Ali, Hamad AlJassmi,Jason Beach, Jennifer Buckingham, Michael Buckingham, Dean Cairns, Manisha Dayal, Muhammet Demirbilek, Yujiro Fujiwara, Anneliese Hulme, Myint Swe Khine, Lee Kenneth Jones, Jennifer Loy, Kehui Luo, Elena Novak, James I. Novak, Joshua Pearce, Dorothy Belle Poli, Chelsea Schelly, Min Jeong Song, Sylvia Stavridi, Lisa Stoneman, Goran Štrkalj, Mirjana Štrkalj, Pamela Sullivan, Jeremy Wendt, Stephanie Wendt, and Sonya Wisdom.
This volume of the World of Science Education gathers contributions from Latin American science education researchers covering a variety of topics that will be of interest to educators and researchers all around the world. The volume provides an overview of research in Latin America, and most of the chapters report findings from studies seldom available for Anglophone readers. They bring new perspectives, thus, to topics such as science teaching and learning; discourse analysis and argumentation in science education; history, philosophy and sociology of science in science teaching; and science education in non-formal settings. As the Latin American academic communities devoted to science education have been thriving for the last four decades, the volume brings an opportunity for researchers from other regions to get acquainted with the developments of their educational research. This will bring contributions to scholarly production in science education as well as to teacher education and teaching proposals to be implemented in the classroom.
Volume Editors: Pamela Burnard and Laura Colucci-Gray
Why Science and Arts Creativities Matter is a ground-breaking text which significantly extends current understandings of STEAM and debates about individuation of disciplines vis-à-vis transdisciplinary theory. Drawing upon posthumanism, new materialism and enactivism, this collection of chapters aims to dwell further into the ways in which we come to know in relationship with the world. The text draws together a wide set of approaches and points of views to stimulate dialogue and awareness of the different ways in which we can extend the repertoire of human faculties for thinking and experiencing the world. A unique invitation is shared with readers to develop greater understanding of the contribution of education across the arts and sciences and to re-imagine our collective futures.

This book is a unique and timely volume that opens up several new lines of enquiry and arguments on STEAM education. It rebalances and readdresses the current emphasis in the literature around STEAM as another, newer opportunity to teach content. Instead, it brings a more specific focus on an entwining of contemporary theorists – putting theory to work – to extend the means for understanding and cultivating science and arts creativities, and make explicit key connections with the materiality of practices. This new go-to text offers a demonstration of how the latest research and theoretically engaged thinking (thinking through theory) on STEAM education can be put to work in practice.

Contributors are: Ramsey Affifi, Sofie Areljung, Chris Brownell, Pamela Burnard, Kerry Chappell, Laura Colucci-Gray, Carolyn Cooke, Kristóf Fenyvesi, Erik Fooladi, Cathy Francis, Lindsay Hetherington, Anna Hickey-Moody, Christine Horn, Tim Ingold, Riikka Kosola, Zsolt Lavicza, Elsa Lee, Saara Lehto, Danielle Lloyd, James Macallister, Caroline Maloney, Tessa Mcgavock, Karin Murris, Lena Nasiakou, Edvin Østergaard, Anne Pirrie, Hermione Ruck Keene, Ruth Sapsed, Diana Scherer, Pallawi Sinha, Margaret Somerville, Keiren Stephenson, Carine Steyn, Jan Van Boeckel, Nicola Walshe, Olivier Werner, Marissa Willcox, and Heather Wren.
How to Learn Better during Visits to Museums, Science Centers, and Science Fieldtrips
The authors provide practical, research-informed, guidelines and detailed lesson plans that improve learning of chemical, physical, biological, and Earth & space sciences. The context for learning is the myriad of exciting opportunities provided by informal science institutions such as zoos, museums, space centers and the outdoors. Many such institutions seek to educate the public and inspire budding scientists. Visits outside school help students relate science to everyday life, providing strong motivation to learn science for all abilities. This book shows the key to making such visits effective, is when they are linked to classroom learning using a learning management system, drawing upon modern students’ fascination with digital technologies and mobile devices.