Author: Amy Golahny
Rembrandt: Studies in his Varied Approaches to Italian Art explores his engagement with imagery by Italian masters. His references fall into three categories: pragmatic adaptations, critical commentary, and conceptual rivalry. These are not mutually exclusive but provide a strategy for discussion.

This study also discusses Dutch artists’ attitudes toward traveling south, surveys contemporary literature praising and/or criticizing Rembrandt, and examines his art collection and how he used it. It includes an examination of the vocabulary used by Italians to describe Rembrandt’s art, with a focus on the patron Don Antonio Ruffo, and closes by considering the reception of his works by Italian artists.
Echoes from a Child’s Soul: Awakening the Moral Imagination of Children presents remarkable poetry inspired by aesthetic education methodology created by children that were labelled academically, socially, and/or emotionally at-risk. Many children deemed average or below-grade level composed poetry beyond their years revealing moral imagination. Art psychology and aesthetic methodology merge to portray the power of awakening children’s voices once silenced. The children’s poetry heralds critical and empathic messages for our future. This book proposes an overwhelming need for change in America’s public-school education system so that no child is ignored, silenced, deemed less than, or marginalized.
The educational world is experiencing exciting yet tension-filled times. We all wish to strengthen and support creativity and creative teaching in schools. Yet recent debates with regards to what “creativity” means, and how it should be implemented, raise the need for more specific approaches. Write a Science Opera (WASO) is one such approach. WASO is a transdisciplinary, inquiry-based approach to teaching at the intersection of art and science in schools. It is all about creative teaching and teaching for creativity.

Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guidebook to Writing a Science Opera provides teachers with the reasons and advantages to introducing pupils of all ages to WASO. It provides step-by-step instructions for how to implement WASO in classrooms. WASO is challenging, but the rewards are powerful: In WASO, it is the pupils’ curiosity and creative imagination which develop their science and art curriculum.

Get ready for an exciting, creative journey…
A Collaborative Painting Ethnography with Maya Artists Pedro Rafael González Chavajay and Paula Nicho Cúmez
To expand the possibilities of "doing arts thinking" from a non-Eurocentric view, Artistic Mentoring as a Decolonizing Methodology: An Evolving Collaborative Painting Ethnography with Maya Artists Pedro Rafael González Chavajay and Paula Nicho Cúmez is grounded in Indigenous perspectives on arts practice, arts research, and art education. Mentored in painting for eighteen years by two Guatemalan Maya artists, Kryssi Staikidis, a North American painter and art education professor, uses both Indigenous and decolonizing methodologies, which involve respectful collaboration, and continuously reexamines her positions as student, artist, and ethnographer searching to redefine and transform the roles of the artist as mentor, historian/activist, ethnographer, and teacher.

The primary purpose of the book is to illuminate the Maya artists as mentors, the collaborative and holistic processes underlying their painting, and the teaching and insights from their studios. These include Imagined Realism, a process excluding rendering from observation, and the fusion of pedagogy and curriculum into a holistic paradigm of decentralized teaching, negotiated curriculum, personal and cultural narrative as thematic content, and the surrounding visual culture and community as text.

The Maya artist as cultural historian creates paintings as platforms of protest and vehicles of cultural transmission, for example, genocide witnessed in paintings as historical evidence. The mentored artist as ethnographer cedes the traditional ethnographic authority of the colonizing stance to the Indigenous expert as partner and mentor, and under this mentorship analyzes its possibilities as decolonizing arts-based qualitative inquiry. For the teacher, Maya world views broaden and integrate arts practice and arts research, inaugurating possibilities to transform arts education.
Visual Methodologies and Approaches to Research in the Early Years
Editor: E. Jayne White
Seeing the World through Children’s Eyes brings an overarching emphasis on ‘seeing’ to early years research. The book provides an opportunity to see and hear from leading researchers in the field concerning how they work with visual methodologies and young children. It explores the problems, pitfalls and promises that these offer for reflexive, critical inquiry that privileges the ‘work of the eye’ whilst implicating the researcher ‘I’ for what is revealed. Readers are invited to see for themselves what might be revealed through their discoveries, and to contemplate how these ideas might influence their own seeings.
Scholarship on adult education has fueled a high level of methodological creativity and innovation in order to tackle a diverse range of issues in a wide range of settings and locations in a critical and participatory manner. Adult education research is marked by the desire to do research differently and to conduct critical research with rather than about people which requires theoretical and methodological creativity. This entails a particular approach to how we seek to know the world in collaboration with people, to rupture hierarchical relations and to create new collaborative spaces of learning and research that encompass the diversity of people’s life experiences.

Doing Critical and Creative Research in Adult Education brings together both leading and emerging scholars in adult education research in order to capture the vitality and complexity of contemporary adult education research. This includes contributions on biographical, narrative, embodied, arts and media-based and ethnographic methods alongside the critical use of quantitative and mixed methods. This distinctive and rich methodological contribution has a general relevance and usefulness for all researchers and students in the social science and humanities, which draws attention to the importance of critical and creative participatory learning processes in human life and learning.
Discoveries in a Dance Theatre Lab Through Creative Process-based Research
In Expressive Arts Education and Therapy the reader follows the creation of art-making in tandem with the unfolding of sense-making. A dance theatre lab is the stage for exploration where what was discovered was phenomenologically and collaboratively reflected upon, the participatory nature of the creative work pouring into the research methodology. Creative Process-based Research efficacy is contingent upon the interaction of three poles – the creator, the product and an experience of the internal/external creative process of the creator. All three perspectives comprise the dynamics required of this research methodology in order to understand what is occurring in these three distinct and essential elements of the creative process. What results is an experience of cohesion that consciously describes this interplay.

The author outlines his influences that contributed to both the art-making and sense-making over the seven year research project. His work in experimental theatre in New York, as an educator with The European Graduate School in Switzerland and his studies with philosopher John de Ruiter in Canada are integrated into the world of research in the field of expressive arts. The visceral component of creating clarity is uncovered and articulated. This book inspires new ways of thinking about participatory, collaborative, arts-centered research where the skill of exposing the artist/researcher’s modus operandi for making art and making sense is named in a myriad of ways that call upon the intellect as well as the artist’s intuitive sense of what to focus on and its relevance to education, therapy and global health.
Arts education research in Canada has increased significantly since the beginning of this century. New forms of arts-based research, such as ethnodrama and a/r/t/ography, have arisen and made significant contributions to the literature. Researchers in departments/schools/faculties of dance, drama, music, visual arts, media studies, cultural studies and education have been successful in acquiring peer-reviewed grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council to undertake large-scale projects and disseminate the findings internationally. The purpose of this edited collection, entitled Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2: Issues and Directions, is to provide an overview of the current research undertaken across the country, thereby providing a valuable resource for students, professors and research associates working in the arts disciplines, media studies, education, and cultural studies.

Contributors are: Bernard W. Andrews, Kathy Browning, Ranya Essmat Saad, Maia Giesbrecht, Shelley M. Griffin, Rita Irwin, Glenys McQueen-Fuentes, Laura Nemoy, Lori Lynn Penny, Jennifer Roswell, Michelle Searle, Alison Shields, Anita Sinner, Darlene St. Georges, Peter Vietgen, John L. Vitale, Jennifer Wicks, Kari-Lynn Winters, and Thibault Zimmer.
Joseph Beuys significantly influenced the development of art in recent decades through his expanded definition of art. In his art and reflections on art, he raised far-reaching questions on the nature of art and its central importance for modern education. His famous claim, “Every human is an artist,“ points to the fundamental ability of every human to be creative in the art of life – with respect to the development of one’s own personality and one’s actions within society. Beuys saw society as an artwork in a permanent process of transformation, a ‘social sculpture‘ in which every person participated, and for which everyone should be educated as comprehensively as possible.

Beuys describes pedagogy as central to his art. This book thus examines important aspects of Beuys’s art and theory and the challenges they raise for contemporary artistic education. It outlines the foundational theoretical qualities of artistic education and discusses the practice of ‘artistic projects’ in a series of empirical examples. The author, Carl-Peter Buschkühle, documents projects he has undertaken with various high school classes. In additional chapters, Mario Urlaß discusses the great value of artistic projects in primary school, and Christian Wagner reflects on his collaboration with the performance artist Wolfgang Sautermeister and school students in a socially-disadvantaged urban area.

Artistic education has become one of the most influential art-pedagogical concepts in German-speaking countries. This book presents its foundations and educational practices in English for the first time.

Why Science and Arts Creativities Matter is a ground-breaking text which significantly extends current understandings of STEAM and debates about individuation of disciplines vis-à-vis transdisciplinary theory. Drawing upon posthumanism, new materialism and enactivism, this collection of chapters aims to dwell further into the ways in which we come to know in relationship with the world. The text draws together a wide set of approaches and points of views to stimulate dialogue and awareness of the different ways in which we can extend the repertoire of human faculties for thinking and experiencing the world. A unique invitation is shared with readers to develop greater understanding of the contribution of education across the arts and sciences and to re-imagine our collective futures.

This book is a unique and timely volume that opens up several new lines of enquiry and arguments on STEAM education. It rebalances and readdresses the current emphasis in the literature around STEAM as another, newer opportunity to teach content. Instead, it brings a more specific focus on an entwining of contemporary theorists – putting theory to work – to extend the means for understanding and cultivating science and arts creativities, and make explicit key connections with the materiality of practices. This new go-to text offers a demonstration of how the latest research and theoretically engaged thinking (thinking through theory) on STEAM education can be put to work in practice.

Contributors are: Ramsey Affifi, Sofie Areljung, Chris Brownell, Pamela Burnard, Kerry Chappell, Laura Colucci-Gray, Carolyn Cooke, Kristóf Fenyvesi, Erik Fooladi, Cathy Francis, Lindsay Hetherington, Anna Hickey-Moody, Christine Horn, Tim Ingold, Riikka Kosola, Zsolt Lavicza, Elsa Lee, Saara Lehto, Danielle Lloyd, James Macallister, Caroline Maloney, Tessa Mcgavock, Karin Murris, Lena Nasiakou, Edvin Østergaard, Anne Pirrie, Hermione Ruck Keene, Ruth Sapsed, Diana Scherer, Pallawi Sinha, Margaret Somerville, Keiren Stephenson, Carine Steyn, Jan Van Boeckel, Nicola Walshe, Olivier Werner, Marissa Willcox, and Heather Wren.