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Yvette V. Lapayese

In every corner of the world, children are learning languages at home that differ from the dominant language used in their broader social world. These children arrive at school with a precious resource: their mother tongue. In the face of this resource and the possibility for biliteracy, majority language educational programs do nothing to support primary language competence. To counter monolingual education, there are significant albeit few initiatives around the world that provide formal support for children to continue to develop competence in their mother tongue, while also learning an additional language or languages. One such initiative is dual language immersion education (DLI).

Interestingly, most (if not all) research on DLI programs focus on the effectiveness of bilingual education vis-à-vis academic access and achievement. The ideologies embedded in the research and guidelines for DLI education, albeit necessary and critical during the early days of DLI schooling, are disconnected from the present realities, epistemologies, and humanness of our bilingual youth.

A Humanizing Dual Language Immersion Education envisions a framework informed by bilingual teachers and students who support biliteracy as a human right. Positioning bilingual education under a human rights framework addresses the basic right of our bi/multilingual youth to human dignity. Respect for the languages of persons belonging to different linguistic communities is essential for a just and democratic society. Given the centrality of language to our sense of who we are and where we fit in the broader world, a connection between linguistic human rights and bilingual education is essential.
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Resisting English Hegemony

A Study of Five English as a Foreign Language (EFL) High School Teachers

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Ewa Barbara Krawczyk

Resisting English Hegemony examines personal and educational English as a Foreign Language (EFL) journey of five public high school teachers and the ways they manifest their pedagogical practices to develop their students’ skills in the English language. This research explores history of EFL in pre and post-communist Poland, EFL teachers’ testimonies, methodologies and tools available for educators interested in EFL theories having roots in research and hands on experience in the EFL learning/teaching field. The research also focuses the development of students’ speaking, communicative, and cooperative skills in post-communist Poland, in the era of Poland’s membership in the European Union, and the era of widespread technology, Internet accessibility, visualization and globalization. The data for this study was collected over three months, and includes classroom observations and personal interviews with the study participants. The data from each participant was compared with the rest of the participants, and the analysis was done through drawing commonalities among their experiences and ways of teaching English as a Foreign Language.
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Knowledge Mobilization in TESOL

Connecting Research and Practice

Edited by Sardar M. Anwaruddin

Most debates about the so-called research-practice gap in TESOL have focused on a one-way transfer of research evidence from the context of origin to the context of application. Rather than continuing such debates, Knowledge Mobilization in TESOL: Connecting Research and Practice sheds light on what happens after research is transferred to contexts of practice such as the classroom. It explores whether or not, and under what circumstances, research can make contributions to teachers’ professional learning and development. By featuring English language teachers’ first-hand accounts of research utilization, the book highlights the complex processes of making research-based knowledge meaningful for pedagogical practice. It shows why the success of any knowledge mobilization project depends on sensitivity to context and teachers’ interpretive engagement with research-based recommendations.

Written in a lucid and accessible style, Knowledge Mobilization in TESOL: Connecting Research and Practice will appeal to a broad readership interested in research utilization in the field of education, especially in TESOL. It will be an informative text for pre-service and graduate courses in TESOL, ELT, applied linguistics, teacher education, and education policy studies. In-service teachers, teacher educators, program administrators, and funding agencies will also find it to be a valuable resource.

Contributors are: Chris Banister, Leigh Yohei Bennett, Xin Chen, Tiffany Johnson, Kendon Kurzer, Cynthia Macknish, Michael McLelland, Nashwa Donna M. Neary, Gina Paschalidou, Aysenur Sagdic, Nashaat Sobhy, Nguyen Thi Thuy Loan, Lorena Valmori, and Robert E. White.
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Edited by Michael Macaluso and Kati Macaluso

The canon, as much an ideology as it is a body of texts perceived to be intrinsic to the high school English classroom, has come under scrutiny for maintaining status quo narratives about whiteness, masculinity, heterosexuality, ability, and even those associated with American ideals of self-reliance, the good life, and the self-made man. Teaching practices around these texts may also reinforce harmful practices and ways of thinking, including those connected to notions of culture, literary merit, and methods of reading, teaching, and learning.

Teaching the Canon in 21st Century Classrooms offers innovative, critical ways of reading, thinking about, and teaching canonical texts in 21st century classrooms. Responding to the increasingly pluralized, digitized, global 21st century English classroom, chapter authors make explicit the ideologies of a canonical text of focus, while also elaborating a pedagogical approach that de-centers the canon, bridges past and present, applies critical theory, and celebrates the rich identities of 21st century readers. In using this book, teachers will be especially poised to take on the canon in their classroom and, thus, to open up their curricula to ideas, values, concerns, and narratives beyond those embedded in the canonical texts.
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Edited by Maryam Azarnoosh, Mitra Zeraatpishe, Akram Faravani and Hamid Reza Kargozari

Issues in Coursebook Evaluation takes a theory to practice approach with emphasis on theoretical underpinnings that lead into practical aspects of the processes of evaluating English language coursebooks. The ten reader-friendly chapters contributed by outstanding scholars cover fundamental concepts in book evaluation which turn this work to a valuable resource book in applied linguistics. The topics covered include the need to evaluate books (why, who, how and when), language learners’ needs, evaluating language and content of coursebooks, evaluating teaching aids, intercultural and socio-cultural perspectives in coursebooks and their evaluation, how to evaluate the authenticity of conversations in ESL textbooks, evaluating ESP textbooks, e-textbook evaluation, and the influence of research on materials evaluation.

Contributors are: Maryam Azarnoosh, Saleh Al-Busaidi, Darío Luis Banegas, Martin Cortazzi, Akram Faravani, Lixian Jin, Hamid Reza Kargozari, Mahboobeh Khosrojerdi, Thom Kiddle, Jayakaran Mukundan, Vahid Nimehchisalem, Golnaz Peyvandi, Seyed Ali Rezvani Kalajahi, Carlos Rico-Troncoso, Lilia Savova, Abdolvahed Zarifi, and Mitra Zeraatpishe.
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Edited by Mitra Zeraatpishe, Akram Faravani, Hamid Reza Kargozari and Maryam Azarnoosh

A reflective teacher as a growth-minded person seeks opportunities to continue professional development. Reflection not only ignites a teacher’s desire for improvement, but also inspires continuous learning. Through an accurate grasp of self-assessment, confidence, self-appraisal, a reflective practitioner can plant the seeds of effective teaching. This book aims to guide EFL teachers to teach language reflectively and effectively. It includes two parts, the first focuses on the SLA theories and their impact on language teaching and the second centers on the reflective and effective teaching of language components and skills. The editors hope this book will be helpful to those wishing to become effective teachers since this results in nurturing learners’ cravings to learn in a safe and supportive environment.

Contributors are: Maryam Azarnoosh, Anne Burns, Graham V. Crookes, Michael R.W. Dawson, Richard R. Day, Akram Faravani, Dorothy Gillmeister, Christine C. M. Goh, Hamid Reza Kargozari, John M. Levis, John I. Liontas, Shawn Loewen, Parviz Maftoon, Jennifer Majorana, Shannon McCrocklin, Hossein Nassaji, Ulugbek Nurmukhamedov, Luke Plonsky, Nima Shakouri, Jun Tian, Laurens Vandergrift, Constance Weaver, and Mitra Zeraatpishe.
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Edited by Joron Pihl, Kristin Skinstad van der Kooij and Tone Cecilie Carlsten

This volume explores teacher and librarian partnerships in literacy education, showing that such partnerships are essential to literacy education in 21st century. Teacher and librarian partnerships contribute significantly to the realization of the democratic mandate of the teaching and library profession. Partnerships respond to the educational challenges characterized by an unprecedented pace of knowledge development, digitalization, globalization and extensive transnational migration.
The contributors reconceptualize literacy education based on teacher and librarian partnerships. Studies from Sweden, Norway and the U. K. analyze such partnerships as sociocultural and intercultural practices, documenting ways in which teacher and librarian partnerships in literacy education enhance reading literacy, learning, empowerment and social justice. The authors treat literacies as social practices, rather than as an autonomous skill, working with interdisciplinary perspectives that draw on educational research, New Literacy Studies, library and information science and interprofessional studies.
Partnerships facilitate reading for pleasure and reading engagement in work with school subjects and curriculum goals, irrespective of socio-economic or cultural background or gender. The partnerships facilitate work with multimodal literacies and inquiry-based learning, both of which are essential in the 21st century. Equally important, the contributors show that the partnerships foster work with the multiple literacies of students and communities, and students’ attachment to the public and school library. The contributors also analyze tensions and contradictions in literacy education and in school library policy and practice, and attempt to deal with these challenges.
Teacher and Librarian Partnerships in Literacy Education in the 21st Century brings together leading scholars in educational research and literacy studies, including Brian V. Street, Teresa Cremin, Joan Swann and Joron Pihl. The volume addresses scholars, and is relevant for students, teachers, librarians and politicians.
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The Open Book

Stories of Academic Life and Writing or Where We Know Things

Ninna Meier and Charlotte Wegener

The Open Book is a radical genre blend: it is an experimental co-memoir exploring the role of writing in academia. It contains stories about life without censoring and without distinguishing between traditional work/life domains and academic/non-academic ways of writing. This is done through discussions of conferences, research collaborations, supervision, taboo pleasures of ‘fun’ writing projects, the temptations of other work, and the everyday life encounters and experiences that stimulate academic thought and writing. Some of the main characters you will meet are researchers, their colleagues and students, sons and daughters, mothers and grandmothers, husbands (past and present), supervisors, pets, old and new friends, and creatures from myths and dreams. Some of the settings include kitchens, fireplaces, couches, gardens, universities, cars, and trains. These characters and places are all there to help examine what the above elements of an ordinary human life might mean in research and for research. Thus, it becomes possible for you as a reader to recognize the stories as both truly human and genuinely academic. This is the first book in a series of publications and projects from the Open Writing Community: a collaboration of academics from different disciplines and countries that seeks to push the boundaries of how we understand and practice academic work and writing.
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Fireflies

Memory, Identity, and Poetry

David P. Owen Jr.

Fireflies is a book about how writing poetry can help us explore memory and identity, and it is also a book of poetry that explores memory and identity. This work is an example of the “liminal” scholarship advocated in The Need for Revision (2011, by the same author), occupying a space in the academic world’s “windows and doorways,” not exactly in any one field but rather in the “spaces-between where the inside and outside commingle”; it seeks to trouble the boundaries between teacher and writer, critic and artist, writer and reader, and teacher and student in a way from which all parties might benefit. Fireflies aims for a different kind of scholarship, and hopes to offer new ways for teachers to be professional and academic.
The second section of the book is a full-length poetry text—the author’s own exploration of the notions that people who teach writing should also be writers, and that poetry is more something you do than something you are. The book says we should write poems not because of some inborn gift for it, but because the act of writing poetry is good for us, and helps us understand ourselves better; it is a book written in the hopes that other books will be written. Maybe by you.
“David Owen has taken his understanding of currere, the root of curriculum, to a new level with his demonstration of the value of reading and writing poetry. He argues that writing poetry develops an ‘attitude of adventure’ into everydayness. As his first chapter ‘Songs of Ourselves’suggests, we all can be Whitman’s if we take up our pens to celebrate what lives around us as well as in us. Owen demonstrates this theory with a calendar of poems he wrote that share small frozen moments of the seasons of a year. Connecting his memories with forays into night skies and fireflies and ‘the fractals that God makes,’ David Owen’s poetic images suggest that our deep connection with Earth can be recovered if we let a little more ‘oak in the voice’ of our words.”— Mary Aswell Doll, author of The Mythopoetics of Currere
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Edited by Naoko Araki

“No one is born fully-formed: it is through self-experience in the world that we become what we are.”—Paulo Freire

Diversity in Japanese Education explores ‘self-experience’ of individual learners and educators in Japan. The word ‘diversity’ is not limited to one’s ethnic background. Here, diversity refers to one’s pedagogical experiences and life experiences; to the norms, beliefs and values that impact such relations. These experiences and relations are fluid as they are shaped and reshaped in global and glocal settings. They are also reflected in praxis of English language learning and teaching in Japan. The authors’ educational backgrounds vary but they all share the common ground of being educators in Japan. Through being involved in learning and/or teaching English language in Japan, they have witnessed and experienced ‘diversity’ in their own pedagogical context. The book focuses on shifting critical and reflexive eyes on qualitative studies of pedagogical experiences rather than presenting one ‘fixed’ view of Japanese education.