Browse results

Volume Editor: Lauren Cifuentes
The rapid rise of e-learning worldwide means that campuses are creating new positions in distance learning leadership, often at the vice-president or vice-provost level. Frequently, those applying for such positions are recently graduated doctoral students or faculty members who have never served in administration. Unlike any other book to date, this Guide to Administering Online Learning provides easy access to an overview of tasks to be accomplished or maintained and perspectives to consider in order to direct dynamic online initiatives. In it, experienced distance learning teachers and administrators share their insights regarding what must be done to administer effective online learning, including theoretical insights as well as practical principles. They provide comprehensive guidelines for addressing issues and needs that distance learning administrators currently face: barriers to adoption, policies, legalities, ethics, strategic planning, emerging technologies, design of professional development, management of the course development process, quality assurance, student support, and recruitment and marketing. This book is a timely offering from those who have effectively led distance learning initiatives for those who are interested in leading distance learning for the next generation of learners. Each chapter includes questions, prompts, or activities to help readers relate the concept to their own experiences.
Leadership Lessons and Mentoring Moments from the Lives of Everyday Educators
Volume Editors: John H. Curry and Sean R. Jackson
Informal learning experiences drive many into the education realm. For some, the opportunity to coach young people in sports or other extra-curricular programs is what motivates them to get out of bed in the morning. It is in these contexts that young people acquire some of the lessons that have stood the tests of time in their memory, and formulated their being. It is these moments that we hope to capture and pass on through this collective work.
The Greatest Lecture I Was Never Taught: Leadership Lessons and Mentoring Moments from the Lives of Everyday Educators asks educators from all sectors (K12, Higher Education, Educational Administrators, Medical, Military, Coaching, etc.) to reflect on these moments and help us pass them on. Some took this as an opportunity to finally thank a mentor. Others presented information on what shaped their priorities; and still others just wanted to tell a story. Whatever their motivation, this collection should serve as an investigation on how the informal teaching moments are a leader’s and mentor’s greatest tool.
Volume Editor: Chris Brink
Around the world, higher education is faced with a fundamental question: what is the basis for our claim of societal legitimacy? In this book, the authors go beyond the classical response regarding teaching, research and community engagement. Instead, the editor puts forward the proposition that the answer lies in responsiveness, the extent to which universities respond, or fail to respond, to societal challenges. Moreover, because of its intractable legacy issues and crisis of inequality, the question regarding the societal legitimacy of universities is particularly clearly manifested in South Africa, one of the most unequal countries in the world.

The Responsive University brings together contributions on the issue of responsiveness from a number of international university leaders, half of them specifically addressing the South African situation within the context of the international situation as presented by the other authors.

In the global discussion about the role of universities in society, this book provides a conceptual framework for a way forward.
Volume Editors: Nian Cai Liu, Yan Wu, and Qi Wang
The Eighth International Conference on World-Class Universities was held in October 2019. The conference theme was “World-Class Universities: Global Trends and Institutional Models”.

The theme of this volume is embedded in the context of an ever-changing and complex world. Changes are taking place constantly in social, economic, cultural and political spheres, such as technological transformation, backlash against globalization and emerging forces of nationalism in various parts of the world, as well as increasing inequality and disparity of wealth, economic and social opportunities. These challenges impact global, national and institutional higher education practices and induce mounting pressure on World-Class Universities to respond effectively to the ferocity of social change.

World-Class Universities, commonly recognized as global research universities or flagship universities, are essential in developing a nation’s potential in the knowledge economy and in seeking conceptual and practical solutions to daunting challenges. This volume sheds light on World-Class Universities’ challenges, opportunities, roles and strategies in response to the changing landscape of higher education and our society as a whole. It is composed of two parts: “Global Trends” and “Institutional Models”.
Volume Editors: Denise Mifsud and Paolo Landri
This edited volume focuses on the cultural situatedness of educational leadership in countries in the Mediterranean basin (Malta, Israel, Spain, Algeria, Portugal, Italy, Cyprus) featuring chapters that explore the reception of the leadership concept and its enactment in education settings within one or more countries of the Mediterranean; consider how both local and global policy discourses work on education leaders who translate this in a distinct school context; focus on the interplay of leaders, followers and context as a complex and ambiguous social construction within the Mediterranean context; study leadership via a combination of a theoretical definition and a consideration of what a particular group means by ‘leadership’, with a specific openness to local meanings; explore the unfolding of education reform as either a top-down or bottom-up process; consider the various cultural, religious, social and local factors that ‘dictate’ both leadership enactment, in addition to the power flow among leaders and followers; argue how the territorial, political and religious conflicts affect educational leadership, and thus the implementation of education reform to either conform to or converge from globalized discourses.

This book is targeted for post-graduate and doctoral students, as well as scholars, interested in the study of educational leadership, policy and politics of education, Mediterranean studies, and sociology of education. It is also of interest to those who feel the need to address the ‘missing-what’ of educational leadership in the Mediterranean region, an area of study that is largely dominated by Western models.
Watch the Promotional Trailer Here! Within today’s rapidly shifting racial demographics, knowing who to trust can be risky. Family History in Black and White: A Novel traces two competitors for the prestigious position of school superintendent. One is white and one is black; both are urban high school principals. Ben, who had been bullied as a child, craves public recognition but, unsure whether he can trust today’s competitive process to be fair to a white man, wrestles with compromising his own integrity to get what he wants. Roxane, who has navigated racism all her life, craves recognition of her humanity, but can’t be sure which of the professionals around her are actually trustworthy, including her chief competitor, Ben. In the end, both must ultimately reckon with the reverberations of a surprising twist in their histories.
The university today is a postmodern, neo-liberal, competitive, boundary-less knowledge conglomerate, a far cry from its historical traditional classical and collegial roots. There is a body of literature on deanship that points to its evolving nature in the contemporary academe characterised by complexity and change. Balancing academic demands simultaneously with the requirements for effective performance, leadership and management, lies at the heart of this very challenging bridging role nowadays. Deans are generally former academics, emerging from a traditional collegial space and often catapulted into the relatively unknown domain of executive management, with its related problems. Deans nowadays are required to be more than collegial, intellectual leaders. They are also meant to be fiscal and human resource experts, fundraisers, politicians, and diplomats.

Deanship in the Global South: Bridging Troubled Waters is about the deans’ lived reality, as they try to balance the demands of both the academe from which they emerge, and the administration to whom they now need to account. Their lack of preparation and inadequate support points to the need for a more strategic, integrated approach to leadership development within their critical bridging roles between the academe and administration.
Institutional leadership in higher education today requires the management of academic, financial and human resources to deliver teaching, research, external engagement, IT, student support, quality assurance, and estate management activities at levels ranging from local to global. This requires the development and deployment of subject expertise, diplomacy as well as a whole range of practical and technical skills. It can be difficult to balance the strategic needs of the institution with its practical, day-to-day management.

Drawing on more than 60 years of higher education experience around the world, the authors set out the fundamental elements of all higher education institutions and place them in a practical framework to enable leaders to understand their institutions more clearly, and develop appropriate responses to the unique issues that arise in each.

Accessible, insightful, comprehensive and universally applicable, An Illustrated Guide to Managing Institutions of Higher Education draws on numerous real-world examples and offers practical exercises to enable institutional leaders to understand how their institutions actually work, to develop appropriate responses to the issues that confront them and to manage their institutions more effectively.
This book focuses on reflective writing, guiding teachers to recognize their potential as professional leaders. The shift to online and blended learning models now favored in education encourages a broader understanding of leadership, particularly its growing relevance to teachers. These models, combined with reflective writing, foster flexible, inclusive teacher learning that responds to each teacher’s strengths, can be used individually and collaboratively to develop teachers as leaders inside and outside the classroom who are critically involved in creating their own professional learning environments. The authors examine leadership in a global range of teaching contexts, each chapter raising diverse issues for teachers aspiring to be leaders in this post-COVID world.

All royalties from this book are donated to the Instituto dos Cegos da Paraiba Adalgisa Cunha (ICPAC), a school in João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil, that serves the low vision and blind community in the area. For years, the Institute has collaborated as a supervised internship site for various teacher education university programs, providing inspiring field work experiences such as those described in Chapter 4 by Carla Reichmann. Brill is proud to support this important cause and match the donation to the Instituto dos Cegos da Paraiba Adalgisa Cunha (ICPAC).
Author: D. G. Mulcahy
Gen Ed is a novel that locates serious discussion of general education in the context of some of the day-to-day realities encountered in putting it into practice and promoting efforts at reform at Metropolitan Atlantic University (aka the Metro). This dual focus is found in the often-pugnacious policy debate among the faculty and a more light-hearted discussion of related questions carried on by Professor Kelly as he models Socratic teaching in his upper-level class for prospective teachers. Reforming general education at the Metro is not free of the vanities and vulgarities of ambitious men and women and self-serving politicians, of course, nor those who poke fun at them. Arnie Smatter, the irrepressible and nosey chat show host of Radio YOY ensures that this does not go unnoticed.

The overall humorous tone of Gen Ed does not detract from Mulcahy’s thoughtful treatment of substantive issues that will be of interest to serious scholars, students, and a general readership. It is the behaviour of those involved, the broader media and political contexts in which events take place, which mainly becomes the object of humorous treatment.