In Critical Reflection on Research in Teaching and Learning, the editors bring together a collection of works that explore a wide range of concerns related to questions of researching teaching and learning in higher education and shine a light on the diversity of qualitative methods in practice. This book uniquely focuses on reflections of practice where researchers expose aspects of their work that might otherwise fit neatly into ‘traditional’ methodologies chapters or essays, but are nonetheless instructive – issues, events, and thoughts that deserve to be highlighted rather than buried in a footnote. This collection serves to make accessible the importance of teaching and learning issues related to learners, teachers, and a variety of contexts in which education work happens.

Contributors are: David Andrews, Candace D. Bloomquist, Agnes Bosanquet, Beverley Hamilton, Henriette Tolstrup Holmegaard, Klondiana Kolomitro,Outi Kyrö-Ämmälä, Suvi Lakkala, Rod Lane, Corrine Laverty, Elizabeth Lee, Körkkö Minna, Narell Patton, Jessica Raffoul, Nicola Simmons, Jee Su Suh, Kim West, and Cherie Woolmer.
The idea of transformation in higher education underpins all policy documents, academic literature and on-going debates in South Africa. Transforming Universities in South Africa: Pathways to Higher Education Reform responds to the pressing need to comprehensively review the post-apartheid experience and assess where South Africa’s higher education stands across the continent and globally, particularly within the country’s efforts to overcome decades of socio-economic imbalances. It addresses the question of whether South Africa’s transformation strategy from apartheid to democracy was simply a symbolic new flag-raising and new anthem singing exercise reflecting a transition akin to those limited decolonization projects elsewhere in the world, or whether something more fundamental was possible and was achieved with political and policy implications for other countries in Africa and globally. This volume's ultimate purpose is to provide a basis for imagining new futures in which South Africa higher education in the context of Africa and the global world takes centre stage.
The evolving societal, political and economic landscape has led to increased demands on higher education institutions to make their contribution and benefits to society more visible, and in many cases with fewer public resources. This book contributes to the understanding of the responsibilities of Higher Education and the challenges posed to the production and circulation of knowledge. It raises questions about the role of higher education in society, its responsibility towards students and staff, and regarding its intended impact. The book brings together a range of topical papers, and a diversity of perspectives: scientific investigations of reputed scholars, critical evidence-based papers of third space professionals, and policymakers’ perspectives on the daily practice and management of higher education institutions and systems. The variety of both content and contributors elevates the richness of the book and its relevance for a large audience.

Contributors are: Victor M. H. Borden, Lex Borghans, Bruno Broucker, Hamish Coates, Gwilym Croucher, Lisa Davidson, Mark Engberg, Philipp Friedrich, Martina Gaisch, Solomon Gebreyohans Gebru, Ton Kallenberg, Kathi A. Ketcheson, Lu Liu, Alfredo Marra, Clare Milsom, Kenneth Moore, Roberto Moscati, Marjolein Muskens, Daniela Nömeyer, Attila Pausits, Svetlana Shenderova, Wafa Singh, Chuanyi Wang, Denyse Webbstock, Gregory Wolniak, and Jiale Yang.
Stories from the Field – Resolving Educational Leadership Dilemmas
In You Can’t Make This Up! the author invites both emerging educational leaders and practicing school administrators to read a series of short stories recounted by principals and vice principals employed in schools across the United States, in Germany and Cyprus. This collection of present-day stories highlights the types of challenges school leaders encounter on a daily basis, all of which demand informed decisions, but none of which are easily resolved.

Each story is presented in a case study format, and aligned with selected elements within one of the ten Professional Standards for Educational Leadership (PSEL). At a critical juncture in each case, a series of “questions to ponder” is presented, followed by a segment describing “what actually occurred?”
In Contextual Intelligence in School Leadership the author presents a new leadership construct suitable for the 21st century context of school improvement. He presents school leadership from contextual intelligence perspective as a function of various elements, which interact within the leadership they shape and the context in which such leadership is exercised to exert influence on the core areas of practice, including student learning, teacher development and school-community engagement. The construct represents a departure from the contemporary leadership theories, which place emphasis on separate elements of leadership and inadvertently create a problem of disintegration that does not bode well for sustainable school improvement.
Pathways to Education Reform for Urban Youth Culture
Author: Nadira Jack
Integrating experience and observations with theoretical ideologies and philosophical dispositions, the author provides a refreshing methodology and vision to the development of curriculum and instruction for administrative leaders, educators and policymakers in an urban education setting.

Collectively combing her administrative and instructional experience as an educator, principal and superintendent, she shares with readers a new pedagogical approach that emphasizes principles of collaboration and co-investigation among educators and students to explore universal life lessons and confront systemic oppression that impact urban youth. The Pedagogy of Consciousness is one that emphasizes a humanizing approach to education with balanced partnerships and shared connections among educators and students. The promise of this compelling model is that it collectively revitalizes a broken, disenfranchised system, while demonstrating the capacity to revolutionize urban education and transform lives.

The book opens up with a historical analysis of education, beginning with its inception and culminating with its present state of affairs, confronting systemic inequities and modes of standardization that still permeate today. The author provokes administrative leaders and educators to value student diversity and rethink the architecture of the traditional school systems by placing students at the forefront of their education through the co-development of curriculum and learning themes that impact their lives on a daily basis.

The Pedagogy of Consciousness provides innovative measures for educators and students alike to recognize the excellence that they were born with. The model, which is based on the dynamic disposition of education as a fluid, organic process, highlights relationship building among educators and students as a core element necessary to create a classroom culture based upon facets of loyalty, trust and mutual respect. To this end, educators and students investigate issues that affect their lives on a daily basis to experience self-growth and liberation that ultimately transcends into a shift in perception, thoughts and action. Embedded in the model is also the use of coping mechanisms and daily affirmations that allow students to recognize the highest form of one’s inner consciousness.

The author demonstrates the importance of leading educational reform through teaching students that they are pillars of their own success.
Automatization and systematic exclusion are beyond common sense within U.S. public schools. The failure to address social problems spills over to schools where youth who refuse to conform to the broken system are labelled as deviant and legitimately excluded. Students who conform are made real by the system and allowed back into society to keep manufacturing the same inequalities. This is the Pinocchio Effect. It involves the legitimization of hegemonic knowledge and the oppression of bodies, mind, and spiritualities. The book analyzes the impact of colonialities within U.S. public education by examining the learning experiences that influence teachers’ and students’ spiritualties, affecting the construction and oppression of their identities. Consequently, the author examines how educators can decolonize the classroom, which functions as a political arena as well as a critical space of praxis in order to reveal how realities and knowledges are made nonexistent—an epistemic blindness and privilege.
We often look back at changing trends in higher education and call them "bandwagons" (temporary fads that everyone rushes to be part of and "jump on"). While much of the hype and jargon of "The Employability Agenda" may fade from the tip of our tongues (or perhaps be subsumed into the norm) in the mid future, there are two fundamental changes that will not: the digital revolution embedded in changing work and economic practices and the “re-globalisation” of the world that this and other politico-economic changes have brought about. These will continue to be part of how we live and work, so tertiary education will need to take its part in supporting employ-ability far beyond either the timing or scope of preparation for initial employment.

Employability is important to local, national and international labour market contexts, parameters and policies. As well as impacting workforces, employability is an essential characteristic of workers. It is very important that employability is understood and enacted as personal employability not just employment of individuals. We have found that employability is defined as much, if not more, by mindset rather than skillset. Part of this mindset involves recognising the unknowns of future work and an even bigger part is recognising our responsibilities as workers and educators lies in shaping our own employability and that of the novice learners and workers in our spaces of influence and communities of practice.

In Education for Employability (Volume 2): Learning for Future Possibilities we continue on from the big agenda discussions of Education for Employability (Volume 1): The Employability Agenda to explore education for employability in a variety of spaces: in the context of higher education as an entrance into the workforce, in joining communities of practice and in the lifelong pursuit of employability – preparing people for a portfolio of careers rather than a job-for-life.

These two books show how educational leaders, educators, industry partners and thought leaders are imagining and addressing the challenges posed by the current and future changes facing our work, practices and workplaces.
In the last twenty-five years there has been a great deal of scholarship about John Dewey’s work, as well as continued appraisal of his relevance for our time, especially in his contributions to pragmatism and progressivism in teaching, learning, and school learning. The Handbook of Dewey’s Educational Theory and Practice provides a comprehensive, accessible, richly theoretical yet practical guide to the educational theories, ideals, and pragmatic implications of the work of John Dewey, America’s preeminent philosopher of education. Edited by a multidisciplinary team with a wide range of perspectives and experience, this volume will serve as a state-of-the-art reference to the hugely consequential implications of Dewey’s work for education and schooling in the 21st century. Organized around a series of concentric circles ranging from the purposes of education to appropriate policies, principles of schooling at the organizational and administrative level, and pedagogical practice in Deweyan classrooms, the chapters will connect Dewey’s theoretical ideas to their pragmatic implications.
Trends, Barriers, and Possibilities
At a time when higher education institutions in the United States are the subject of increased media scrutiny and nearly continuous loss of funding by resource-strapped state legislatures, a greater understanding of higher education’s bulwark resource—mid-career research and teaching faculty—is more important than ever. Faculty at mid-career comprise the largest segment of academia. For some, this is a time of significant productivity and creativity, yet for others, it is a time of disillusionment and stagnation. Revealing impediments and pathways to faculty job satisfaction and productivity will strengthen higher education institutions by protecting, fostering, and maintaining this vital workforce. In this collection we will explore the lives of mid-career faculty as our authors uncover the complexities in this stage of professional life and discuss support systems for the transition into this period of faculties’ academic careers.

Mid-Career Faculty: Trends, Barriers, and Possibilities is designed for faculty leaders, administration, policymakers, and anyone concerned with the future of higher education. This text offers an examination into an often overlooked period of academic life, that of post-tenure mid-career faculty. Therefore, the aim of this text is to deepen our understanding of the lives of mid-career faculty, to identify barriers that impede job advancement and satisfaction, and to offer suggestions for changes to current policy and practice in higher education.

Contributors are: Joyce Alexander, Michael Bernard-Donals, Pradeep Bhardwaj, Kimberly Buch, Javier Cavazos, Jay R. Dee, Anne M. DeFelippo, Andrea Dulin, Jeremiah Fisk, Carrie Graham, Debbie L. Hahs-Vaughn, Florencio Eloy Hernandez, Yvette Huet, Jane McLeod, Jennifer McGarry, Maria L. Morales, Eliza Pavalko, Laura Plummer, Mandy Rispoli, Amanda J. Rockinson-Szapkiw, J. Blake Scott, Michael Terwillegar, Jenna Thomas and Claudia Vela.