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The series, Educational Leadership and Leaders in Contexts, emphasizes how historical and contextual assumptions shape the meanings and values assigned to the term leadership. The series includes books along four distinct threads:
• Reconsidering the role of social justice within the contexts of educational leadership
• Promoting a community of leadership: Reaching out and involving stakeholders and the public
• Connecting the professional and personal dimensions of educational leadership
• Reconceptualizing educational leadership as a global profession
Perhaps to a greater extent than ever before, today's educational leaders find themselves living in a world that is substantially different from what it was just a decade ago. The threads of social justice, community leadership, professional and personal dimensions, and globalism have added contextual dimensions to educational leaders that are often not reflected in their local job descriptions. This book series will focus on how these changing contexts affect the theory and practice of educational leaders.
Similarly, the professional lives of educational leaders has increasingly impinged upon their personal well-being, such that it now takes a certain type of individual to be able to put others before self for extended periods of their working life. This series will explore the dynamic relationship between the personal and the professional lives of school leaders.
With respect to communities, recent educational reforms have created a need for communities to know more about what is happening inside of classrooms and schools. While education is blamed for many of the ills identified in societies, school leaders and school communities are generally ignored or excluded from the processes related to social development. The challenge facing school leaders is to work with and build community support through the notion of community leadership. Thus, leadership itself involves working with teachers, students, parents and the wider community in order to improve schools.
As for the fourth thread, globalism, school leaders must now work with multiple languages, cultures, and perspectives reflecting the rapid shift of people from one part of the world to another. Educational leaders now need to be educated to understand global perspectives and react to a world where a single way of thinking and doing no longer applies.
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Lauren Stephenson, Barbara Harold and Rashida Badri

In a world of constant change, the ongoing education and empowerment of women is a transformation of profound significance. In the UAE, and in Dubai in particular, the emergence of women into positions of leadership has accelerated over the past thirty years and continues to gather pace, reflecting a worldwide trend. Emirati women's entry into leadership positions in all fields has resulted in social and economic benefits across education, health, commerce and community services – all of which have strengthened the role of women at the grassroots level. As the world grows smaller, the global circle of opportunity for women grows wider. Throughout the UAE and all across the globe women are assuming their rightful place as leaders in education and in society.


The authors conducted a ten-year collaborative narrative research project culminating in a book of jointly constructed stories of five exceptional female Emirati educational leaders. The five women from Dubai are Raja Al Gurg, Raya Rashid, Fatima Al Marri, Rafia Abbas, and Rashida Badri. Through stories of lived experience, this book recognizes the expertise and contributions of these women to the fields of education and leadership; provides exemplars for educators; demonstrates to younger generations what successes and challenges this generation of women faced in order to achieve recognition as successful women and members of the local, regional, and global community; and makes their leadership perspectives and experiences accessible and engaging for all types of audiences.
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Navigating Uncertainty

Sensemaking for Educational Leaders

Shelley Hasinoff and David Mandzuk

In Navigating Uncertainty: Sensemaking for Educational Leaders, the authors introduce a 5-step sensemaking approach for managing the kinds of challenging problems, dilemmas and crises that occur daily in educational systems. Drawing on complexity theory, social capital, and sensemaking, they make the case that educational leaders can no longer rely on traditional scientific principles or their own instincts to manage complex problems but need a new way to think about their certainties and their relationships. The authors illustrate their approach with scenarios, based on the real-life experiences of principals, superintendents and deans and provide several innovative tools to help educational leaders better understand and navigate the uncertainties they face every day in their jobs.
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Lauren Stephenson, Barbara Harold and Rashida Badri

In a world of constant change, the ongoing education and empowerment of women is a transformation of profound significance. In the UAE, and in Dubai in particular, the emergence of women into positions of leadership has accelerated over the past thirty years and continues to gather pace, reflecting a worldwide trend. Emirati women's entry into leadership positions in all fields has resulted in social and economic benefits across education, health, commerce and community services – all of which have strengthened the role of women at the grassroots level. As the world grows smaller, the global circle of opportunity for women grows wider. Throughout the UAE and all across the globe women are assuming their rightful place as leaders in education and in society.


The authors conducted a ten-year collaborative narrative research project culminating in a book of jointly constructed stories of five exceptional female Emirati educational leaders. The five women from Dubai are Raja Al Gurg, Raya Rashid, Fatima Al Marri, Rafia Abbas, and Rashida Badri. Through stories of lived experience, this book recognizes the expertise and contributions of these women to the fields of education and leadership; provides exemplars for educators; demonstrates to younger generations what successes and challenges this generation of women faced in order to achieve recognition as successful women and members of the local, regional, and global community; and makes their leadership perspectives and experiences accessible and engaging for all types of audiences.
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The Teacher’s Role in the Changing Globalizing World

Resources and Challenges Related to the Professional Work of Teaching

Edited by Hannele Niemi, Auli Toom, Arto Kallioniemi and Jari Lavonen

The teacher's role is changing rapidly throughout the world. Traditional ways of working as a teacher are being challenged and teachers are faced with new areas of expertise they need to manage as educational professionals. These characteristics, challenges, and changes in the teacher’s role have been identified internationally and are both conceptual and practical. Teachers’ work now includes much more than teaching in classrooms and has expanded to designing new learning environments, collaboration and networking with others and mentoring colleagues. The Teacher’s Role in the Changing Globalizing World addresses the significance of considering these issues, researching them, and emphasising the importance of actively influencing and protecting the parameters of the teacher role.
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Experiments in Agency

A Global Partnership to Transform Teacher Research

Edited by Supriya Baily, Farnoosh Shahrokhi and Tami Carsillo

This book is about teacher agency and leadership, but it is also an experiment in shifting the balance of power in research and writing. It is about making accessible the process of academic publishing in a way that capitalizes on the knowledge of people in diverse contexts and with novice eyes and is an experiment in sharing academic writing between master teachers and doctoral students. It is also a book on the power of action research and the belief we have as teacher educators about the transformative power of teachers in their own classrooms. Pairing master teachers from ten countries who were part of the Teaching Excellence and Achievement Program with graduate students, this book provides a framework to decolonize research practices in an effort to re-envision research methodologies on a global scale. The book also provides a tangible way to see how research processes support local transformation, and direct engagement of those at the margins to play a greater role in the production of scholarly knowledge. The cross-national scope of this book, with authors working in classrooms in countries as diverse as Turkey, Chile, and Bangladesh coupled work of novice US-based scholars to engage in the conceptualizing, researching, data analysis and writing of chapters speaks to the importance of new voices in the field of research. Additionally, the combination of teacher research projects in the classroom juxtaposed with chapters that speak to the process of teacher research in a global context provides both theoretical and empirical foundations for teacher research.
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Out-of-Field Teaching Practices

What Educational Leaders Need to Know

Anna Elizabeth du Plessis

Society perceives the role of school leaders as ‘fixers’. Yet the author poses some confronting questions: can they fix or manage the out-of-field phenomenon without having in-depth knowledge and understanding? Can educators teach the next generation of teachers and school leaders without appreciating the realities of the workplace? Can policymakers develop effective policies without a deeper understanding of the workforce issues that influence quality education beyond the obvious issues?
Many dilemmas face today’s teaching workforce and workplaces. The book takes the reader on a journey as experienced in real life by teachers and school leaders. It aims an extreme global focus on the quality of education and on governments’ achievements in providing opportunities to prepare the next generation of students for their future.
The author’s assessment exposes more concerns than assurances.
Anna du Plessis’ academic career includes more than 25 years of classroom experience across three countries. Her journey in leadership positions started during her fourth year of teaching. Her compassion for teachers, school leaders and students stimulated a search for a deeper understanding of the lifeworld and challenges facing educational practitioners.
The objective in this book is to share information that will improve education systems, strategies, decisions, policies and actions. Readers of this book might be parents, student teachers, prospective school leaders, educational directors, policymakers or teacher educators.
Only knowing and understanding can inform well-directed decisions.
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Women of Influence in Education

Practising Dilemmas and Contesting Spaces

Edited by Nita Cherry and Joy Higgs

The goal in writing this book was to stimulate more comprehensive conversations about women in leadership situations (particularly secondary and tertiary education contexts) by understanding how women have gone about creating positive differences in educational environments.
Frequently books about women and leadership deal with the politics of this discussion space and the statistics of women succeeding to and through the glass ceiling, or not! The focus of this book is on a different space: on learning from the experiences of women doing leadership work.
The research strategy underpinning the book was to listen to the voices and stories of 28 women occupying senior roles in education. Half of these women were principals of independent Victorian secondary schools and the other half were in professorial and senior leadership roles in Victorian universities. Through this listening and pondering on their experiences the authors came to recognise that these women of influence were working in contested spaces and facing multiple practice dilemmas. Readers are invited to explore these spaces and dilemmas, considering the learnings from the women whose lives, views and experiences are represented here.
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The Best Available Evidence

Decision Making for Educational Improvement

Edited by Paul Newton and David Burgess

In The Best Available Evidence : Decision-Making for Educational Improvement, the editors and contributing authors explore the intricacies of working with data and evidence for the purpose or organizational development in educational institutions. A broad theme that runs throughout this book is the need for policy makers and practitioners to be informed and critical consumers of educational research. The chapters in this volume explore quantitative, qualitative, narrative, and practitioner research approaches and explore the implications for evidence use in educational improvement efforts.
Many current texts provide an instrumental resource for educational leaders for use in designing road maps for improvement. As such, these texts offer a perspective based on assumptions that educational personnel are the recipients of predetermined knowledge and evidence, and it is the task of instructors and teachers to implement received knowledge of “best practice”. In this book, we suggest that teachers, instructors, educational leaders, and policy makers are equally engaged in the creation of knowledge and the establishment of improvement objectives. Further, we address questions concerning what constitutes improvement, how practitioners and policy makers can assess the utility and veracity of evidence, and how evidence might be considered in productive and ethical ways. This volume is intended for a broad readership of teachers, post-secondary instructors, graduate students, educational leaders, and policy makers. Finally, this book will combine K-12 perspectives on educational improvement with perspectives from the research on post-secondary improvement.
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Cultivating Knowledge

Promoting Research to Enrich Everyday Practice

Scott Tunison

Over the last decade or two, there has been increasing consensus that academic research, if used judiciously to guide practice, improves both educational policy and pedagogy—ultimately leading to better outcomes for students. Yet, despite this potential, there remains a deep ravine between the body of knowledge built through research—especially at the intersection between specific interventions and improved student achievement—and the actions taken by policy makers, administrators, and classroom teachers in their regular practice. There are myriad reasons for this research-practice divide. Among them is that it is difficult for district-based people to access primary research. Furthermore, multiple waves of well-intentioned research-based but largely unsuccessful school reform efforts have resulted in skepticism among practitioners about research and, at the same time, damaged researchers’ credibility in the field.
This book is divided into three broad areas. First, it develops an engaging analysis of the root causes for the research-practice gap in education. Second, it describes the framework developed and used in a public school district by the author to address the root causes and provides evidence of its efficacy to facilitate greater incorporation of research into school- and district-level practice. Through a process the author calls Knowledge Cultivation, the framework uses weekly research summaries for district leaders that are relevant to their “real-time” issues along with suggestions about ways in which the research might be useful. The final section of the book includes the actual research summaries used by the author over a five-year period.