Editors: Boris Barth and Rolf Hobson
Lessons from Founders E. Franklin Frazier, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the Atlanta School of Sociology
In Introduction to Africana Demography: Lessons from Founders E. Franklin Frazier, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the Atlanta School of Sociology scholars from across the country wed Black Sociology with critical demography within an Africana Demography framework. Contributors speak to innovative ways to address pressing issues and have the added benefit of affording many of the scholars denied their rightful place in the sociological and demographic canons. Specifically, the book includes an introduction outlining Africana demography and chapters that provide a critique of conventional demographic approaches to understanding race and social institutions, such as the family, religion, and the criminal justice system.


Contributors include: Lori Latrice Martin, Anthony Hill, Melinda Jackson-Jefferson, Maretta McDonald, Weldon McWilliams, Jack S. Monell, Edward Muhammad, Brianne A. Painia, Tifanie Pulley, David I. Rudder, Jas Sullivan, Arthur Whaley, and Deadric Williams.
In A Grammar of Murui (Bue), Katarzyna Wojtylak provides the first complete description of Murui, an endangered Witotoan language, spoken by the Murui-Muina (Witoto) people from Colombia and Peru. The grammar is written from a functional and typological perspective, using natural language data gathered during several fieldtrips to the Caquetá-Putumayo region between 2013 and 2017. The many remarkable characteristics of Murui include a complex system of classifiers, differential subject and object marking, person-marking verb morphology, evidential and epistemic marking, head-tail linkage, and a system of numerals, including the fraternal (brother-based) forms for ‘three’ and ‘four’. The grammar represents an important contribution to the study of Witotoan languages, linguistic typology of Northwest Amazonia, and language contact in the area.
Dorothy Fujita-Rony’s The Memorykeepers: Gendered Knowledges, Empires, and Indonesian American History examines the importance of women's memorykeeping for two Toba Batak women whose twentieth-century histories span Indonesia and the United States, H.L.Tobing and Minar T. Rony. This book addresses the meanings of family stories and artifacts within a gendered and interimperial context, and demonstrates how these knowledges can produce alternate cartographies of memory and belonging within the diaspora. It thus explores how women’s memorykeeping forges integrative possibility, not only physically across islands, oceans, and continents, but also temporally, across decades, empires, and generations. Thirty-five years in the making, The Memorykeepers is the first book on Indonesian Americans written within the fields of US history, American Studies, and Asian American Studies.
Governance and Promotion in John Winthrop’s New England (1630-1650)
Author: Agnès Delahaye
Settling the Good Land: Governance and Promotion in John Winthrop’s New England (1620-1650) is the first institutional history of the Massachusetts Bay Company, cornerstone of early modern English colonisation in North America. Agnès Delahaye analyses settlement as a form of colonial innovation, to reveal the political significance of early New England sources, above and beyond religion. John Winthrop was not just a Puritan, but a settler governor who wrote the history of the expansion of his company as a record of successful and enduring policy. Delahaye argues that settlement, as the action and the experience of appropriating the land, is key to understanding the role played by Winthrop’s writings in American historiography, before independence and in our times.
In Giles Firmin and the Transatlantic Puritan Tradition, Jonathan Warren Pagán offers an intellectual biography of Giles Firmin (1613/14-1697), who lived in both Old and New England and lived through many of the transitions of international puritanism in the seventeenth century. By contextualizing Firmin in his intellectual milieu, Warren Pagán also offers a unique vantage on the transition of puritanism to Dissent in late Stuart England, surveying changing approaches to ecclesiology, pastoral theology, and the ordo salutis among the godly during the Restoration through Firmin’s writings.
A Global Studies Perspective on Brazil-Mozambique Development Discourse
What history and motivations make up the discourses we are taught to hold, and spread, as common sense? As a member of Brazil's upper middle class, Ana Beatriz Ribeiro grew up with the image that to be developed was to be as European as possible. However, as a researcher in Europe during her country's Workers' Party era, she kept reading that Africans should be repaid for developing Brazilian society – via Brazil's "bestowal" of development upon Africa as an "emerging power." In Modernization Dreams, Lusotropical Promises, the researcher investigates where these two worldviews might intersect, diverge and date back to, gauging relations between representatives and projects of the Brazilian and Mozambican states, said to be joined in cooperation more than others.
Christian-Muslim Relations. A Bibliographical History 16 (CMR 16) covering North America, South-East Asia, China, Japan and Australasia in the period 1800-1914, is a further volume in a general history of relations between the two faiths from the 7th century to the early 20th century. It comprises a series of introductory essays and the main body of detailed entries. These treat all the works, surviving or lost, that have been recorded. They provide biographical details of the authors, descriptions and assessments of the works themselves, and complete accounts of manuscripts, editions, translations and studies. The result of collaboration between numerous leading scholars, CMR 16, along with the other volumes in this series, is intended as a basic tool for research in Christian-Muslim relations.

Section Editors: Clinton Bennett, Luis F. Bernabe Pons, Jaco Beyers, Emanuele Colombo, Lejla Demiri, Martha Frederiks, David D. Grafton, Stanisław Grodź, Alan Guenther, Vincenzo Lavenia, Arely Medina, Alain Messaoudi, Gordon Nickel, Claire Norton, Reza Pourjavady, Douglas Pratt, Radu Păun, Charles Ramsey, Peter Riddell, Umar Ryad, Mehdi Sajid, Cornelia Soldat, Karel Steenbrink, Charles Tieszen, Carsten Walbiner, Catherina Wenzel.
In Educating for Social Justice: Field Notes from Rural Communities, educators from across the United States offer their experiences engaging in rural, place-based social justice education. With education settings ranging from university campuses in Georgia to small villages in New Mexico, each chapter details the stories of teaching and learning within the often-overlooked rural areas of the United States.

Attempting to highlight the experiences of rural educators, this text explores the triumphs, challenges, and hopes of teachers who strive to implement justice pedagogy in their rural settings.

Contributors are: Carey E. Andrzejewski, Hannah Carson Baggett, Sarah N. Baquet, T. Jameson Brewer, Brianna Brown, Christian D. Chan, Elizabeth Churape-García, Jason Collins, María Isabel Cortés-Zamora, Jacqueline Daniel, Joanna Davis-McElligatt, Katy Farber, Derek R. Ford, Sheri C. Hardee, Jehan Hill, Lynn Liao Hodge, Renee C. Howells, Adam W. Jordan, Rosann Kent, Shea N. Kerkhoff, Jeffery B. Knapp, Peggy Larrick, Leni Marshall, Kelly L. McFaden, Morgan Moore, Kaitlinn Morin, Nora Nuñez-Gonzalez, Daniel Paulson, Emma Redden, Angela Redondo, Gregory Samuels, Hiller Spires, Ashley Walther, Serena M. Wilcox, Madison Wolter, and Sharon Wright.