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Author: Gohar Muradyan
Greek myths were, to some extent, familiar to medieval Armenian authors, mainly through translations of late classical and early Christian writings; they also appear in original works, but this knowledge was never profound or accurate. Both translators and Armenian authors, as well as later scribes, while translating, renarrating and copying short mythical stories, or mentioning or just alluding to them often related the stories and the familiar or unfamiliar names occurring in them correctly, but sometimes they made mistakes, chiefly corrupting names not well-known to them, and sometimes, even details of the plot.
This is the first study which brings together the references to ancient Greek myths (154 episodes) in medieval Armenian literature by including the original Armenian and Greek (if extant) text and translation. With appendices listing the occurrences of Greek gods, their Armenian equivalents, images, altars, temples, and rites, the Aesopian fables and the Trojan war.
This volume focuses on Christianity in Attica and its metropolis, Athens, from Paul’s initial visit in the first century up to the closing of the philosophical schools under the reign of Justinian I in the sixth century. Underscoring the relevance of epigraphic resources and the importance of methodological sophistication in analysing especially archaeological evidence, it readdresses many questions on the basis of a larger body of evidence and aims to combine literary, epigraphic, and archaeological evidence in order to create the outlines of a narrative of the rise and development of Christianity in the area. It is the first interdisciplinary study on the local history of Christianity in the area.
This is a ground-breaking philosophical-historical study of the work of Galen of Pergamum. It contains four case-studies on (1) Galen’s remarkable and original thoughts on the relation between body and soul, (2) his notion of human nature, (3) his engagement with Plato’s Timaeus, (4) black bile and melancholy. It shows that Galen develops an innovative view of human nature that problematizes the distinction between body and soul.
Embedded Speeches, Audience Responses, and Authorial Persuasion
Author: John M. Duncan
Greco-Roman rhetorical theorists insist that speakers must adapt their speeches to their audiences in order to maximize persuasiveness and minimize alienation. Ancient historians adorn their narratives with accounts of attempts at such rhetorical adaptation, the outcomes of which decisively impact the subsequent course of events. These depictions of speaker-audience interactions, moreover, convey crucial didactic/persuasive insights to the historians’ own audiences. This monograph presents a detailed comparative analysis of the intra- and extra-textual functions of speeches and audience responses in Greek historiography, Josephus, and Acts, with special emphasis on Luke’s distinctive depiction of the apostles as adaptable yet frequently alienating orators.
Author: John M. Duncan
Greco-Roman rhetorical theorists insist that speakers must adapt their speeches to their audiences in order to maximize persuasiveness and minimize alienation. Ancient historians adorn their narratives with accounts of attempts at such rhetorical adaptation, the outcomes of which decisively impact the subsequent course of events. These depictions of speaker-audience interactions, moreover, convey crucial didactic/persuasive insights to the historians’ own audiences. This monograph presents a detailed comparative analysis of the intra- and extra-textual functions of speeches and audience responses in Greek historiography, Josephus, and Acts, with special emphasis on Luke’s distinctive depiction of the apostles as adaptable yet frequently alienating orators.