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The Gold and the Dross

Althusser for Educators

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David I. Backer

In the last decade, there has been an international resurgence of interest in the philosophy of Louis Althusser. New essays, journalism, collections, secondary literature, and even manuscripts by Althusser himself are emerging, speaking in fresh ways to audiences of theorists and activists. Althusser is especially important in educational thought, as he famously claimed that school is the most impactful ideological state apparatus in modern society. This insight inspired a generation of educational researchers, but Althusser’s philosophy—unique in a number of ways, one of which was its emphasis on education—largely lost popularity.

Despite this resurgence of interest, and while Althusser’s philosophy is important for educators and activists to know about, it remains difficult to understand. The Gold and the Dross: Althusser for Educators, with succinct prose and a creative organization, introduces readers to Althusser’s thinking. Intended for those who have never encountered Althusser’s theory before, and even those who are new to philosophy and critical theory in general, the book elaborates the basic tenets of Althusser’s philosophy using examples and personal stories juxtaposed with selected passages of Althusser’s writing. Starting with a beginner’s guide to interpellation and Althusser’s concept of ideology, the book continues by elaborating the epistemology and ontology Althusser produced, and concludes with his concepts of society and science. The Gold and the Dross makes Althusser’s philosophy more available to contemporary audiences of educators and activists.
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The Labour of Words in Higher Education

Is it Time to Reoccupy Policy?

Sarah Hayes

As Higher Education has come to be valued for its direct contribution to the global economy, university policy discourse has reinforced this rationale. In The Labour of Words in Higher Education: Is it Time to Reoccupy Policy? two globes are depicted. One is a beautiful, but complete artefact, that markets a UK university. The second sits on a European city street and is continually inscribed with the markings of passers-by. A distinction is drawn between the rhetoric of university McPolicy, as a discourse that appears to no longer require input from humans, and a more authentic approach to writing policy, that acknowledges the academic labour of staff and students, in effecting change.

Inspired by the work of George Ritzer on the McDonaldisation of Society, the term McPolicy is adopted by the author, to describe a rational method of writing policy, now widespread across UK universities. Recent strategies on ‘the student experience’, ‘technology enhanced learning’, ‘student engagement’ and ‘employability’ are explored through a corpus-based Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA). Findings are humourously compared to the marketing of consumer goods, where commodities like cars are invested with human qualities, such as ‘ambition’. Similarly, McPolicy credits non-human strategies, technologies and a range of socially constructed buzz phrases, with the human qualities and labour activities that would normally be enacted by staff and students.

This book is written for anyone with an interest in the future of universities. It concludes with suggestions of ways we might all reoccupy McPolicy.
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No BS (Bad Stats)

Black People Need People Who Believe in Black People Enough Not to Believe Every Bad Thing They Hear about Black People

Ivory A. Toldson

What if everything you thought you knew about Black people generally, and educating Black children specifically, was based on BS (bad stats)? We often hear things like, “Black boys are a dying breed,” “There are more Black males in prison than college,” “Black children fail because single mothers raise them,” “Black students don’t read” and “Black students underachieve because they don’t want to act White.” In No BS, Ivory A. Toldson uses robust data analysis, meaningful anecdotes, and powerful commentary to dispel common myths and challenge conventional beliefs about educating Black children.

No BS is comprised of two parts. Part 1 introduces a framework for conceptualizing data on Black students and debunks seven myths that dupe people into believing that Black children are not academically adept. Part 2 features chapters that demonstrate the importance of believing in Black students, and their families, history, culture, and teachers. With prose that is provocative, engaging, and at times humorous, Toldson teaches educators, parents, advocates, and students how to avoid BS, raise expectations, and create an educational agenda for Black children that is based on good data, thoughtful analysis and a compassionate understanding. No BS helps people understand why Black people need people who believe in Black people enough not to believe every bad thing they hear about Black people.
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STEM of Desire

Queer Theories and Science Education

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Edited by Will Letts and Steve Fifield

STEM of Desire: Queer Theories and Science Education locates, creates, and investigates intersections of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and queer theorizing. Manifold desires—personal, political, cultural—produce and animate STEM education. Queer theories instigate and explore (im)possibilities for knowing and being through desires normal and strange. The provocative original manuscripts in this collection draw on queer theories and allied perspectives to trace entanglements of STEM education, sex, sexuality, gender, and desire and to advance constructive critique, creative world-making, and (com)passionate advocacy. Not just another call for inclusion, this volume turns to what and how STEM education and diverse, desiring subjects might be(come) in relation to each other and the world.

STEM of Desire is the first book-length project on queering STEM education. Eighteen chapters and two poems by 27 contributors consider STEM education in schools and universities, museums and other informal learning environments, and everyday life. Subject areas include physical and life sciences, engineering, mathematics, nursing and medicine, environmental education, early childhood education, teacher education, and education standards. These queering orientations to theory, research, and practice will interest STEM teacher educators, teachers and professors, undergraduate and graduate students, scholars, policy makers, and academic libraries.

Contributors are: Jesse Bazzul, Charlotte Boulay, Francis S. Broadway, Erin A. Cech, Steve Fifield, blake m. r. flessas, Andrew Gilbert, Helene Götschel, Emily M. Gray, Kristin L. Gunckel, Joe E. Heimlich, Tommye Hutson, Kathryn L. Kirchgasler, Michelle L. Knaier, Sheri Leafgren, Will Letts, Anna MacDermut, Michael J. Reiss, Donna M. Riley, Cecilia Rodéhn, Scott Sander, Nicholas Santavicca, James Sheldon, Amy E. Slaton, Stephen Witzig, Timothy D. Zimmerman, and Adrian Zongrone.
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Understanding Israel/Palestine

Race, Nation, and Human Rights in the Conflict (Second Edition)

Eve Spangler

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is the longest, ongoing hot and cold war of the 20th and 21st centuries. It has generated more refugees than any other current conflict, fully one quarter of all refugees world-wide. Everyone knows that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is an important topic, but most people shy away from thinking about it, believing it is “just too complicated” to understand. This book is written for people who want a point of entry into the conversation. It offers both a historical overview and a moral framework, arguing that human rights standards (which have never been tried) are the only basis for creating a just and durable peace. Readers, whether students, parishioners, neighbors, voters, or dinner guests will find here an analysis of the commonest Israel voices and also the Palestinian points of view we seldom hear. This book will be useful for classes in Middle East Studies, Middle East and Colonial History, Peace and Conflict Studies, Sociology of Race, and Political Science. It can be useful to church groups, labor groups, or other grass roots organizations committed to social justice, and for all readers who wish to be informed about this controversial topic.
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Edited by Sue Vella, Ruth Falzon and Andrew Azzopardi

The study of wellbeing is not new. Over two millennia ago, the Ancient Greeks were already debating different conceptions of the good life, and how it may be fostered, albeit a debate for the privileged in ancient Greek society. More recently, the post-WWII concern with economic scarcity gave way – as prosperity rose in the later 20th century – to values such as personal growth and social inclusion. In parallel, research has increasingly turned its focus to wellbeing, going beyond traditional measures of income, wealth and employment. Greater attention is now paid to the subjective experience of wellbeing which, it is broadly agreed, has many dimensions such as life satisfaction, optimal functioning and a good quality of life.

Perspectives on Wellbeing: A Reader brings together a number of chapters that examine wellbeing from different disciplinary perspectives. A number of the chapters take the angle of human flourishing, looking at the respective contributions of belonging, emotional resilience, spirituality, prosocial behaviour, literacy and leisure. Others look at wellbeing through a social relations lens, including family relations, youth, persons with disability and gender. Finally, a chapter on wellbeing and economics illustrates different approaches to measuring wellbeing and identifying its determinants. The book concludes with a chapter that argues for the enduring importance of the welfare state if the wellbeing of all is to be ensured.

This book is likely to be of interest to both undergraduate and postgraduate students in the social sciences as well as to a general readership.

Contributors are: Angela Abela, Andrew Azzopardi, Paul Bartolo, Marie Briguglio, Amy Camilleri Zahra, Joanne Cassar, Marilyn Clark, Ruth Falzon, Vickie Gauci, Ingrid Grech Lanfranco, Natalie Kenely, Mary Anne Lauri, Marceline Naudi, Claudia Psaila, Clarissa Sammut Scerri, Sandra Scicluna Calleja, Barbara Stelmaszek, Sue Vella, and Val Williams.
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Edited by Dianne Siemon, Tasos Barkatsas and Rebecca Seah

The relationship between research and practice has long been an area of interest for researchers, policy makers, and practitioners alike. One obvious arena where mathematics education research can contribute to practice is the design and implementation of school mathematics curricula. This observation holds whether we are talking about curriculum as a set of broad, measurable competencies (i.e., standards) or as a comprehensive set of resources for teaching and learning mathematics. Impacting practice in this way requires fine-grained research that is focused on individual student learning trajectories and intimate analyses of classroom pedagogical practices as well as large-scale research that explores how student populations typically engage with the big ideas of mathematics over time. Both types of research provide an empirical basis for identifying what aspects of mathematics are important and how they develop over time.

This book has its origins in independent but parallel work in Australia and the United States over the last 10 to 15 years. It was prompted by a research seminar at the 2017 PME Conference in Singapore that brought the contributors to this volume together to consider the development and use of evidence-based learning progressions/trajectories in mathematics education, their basis in theory, their focus and scale, and the methods used to identify and validate them. In this volume they elaborate on their work to consider what is meant by learning progressions/trajectories and explore a range of issues associated with their development, implementation, evaluation, and on-going review. Implications for curriculum design and future research in this field are also considered.

Contributors are: Michael Askew, Tasos Barkatsas, Michael Belcher, Rosemary Callingham, Doug Clements, Jere Confrey, Lorraine Day, Margaret Hennessey, Marj Horne, Alan Maloney, William McGowan, Greg Oates, Claudia Orellana, Julie Sarama, Rebecca Seah, Meetal Shah, Dianne Siemon, Max Stephens, Ron Tzur, and Jane Watson.
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Turn to Film

Film in the Business School Classroom

Edited by Hugo Letiche and Jean-Luc Moriceau

Turn to Film: Film in the Business School Classroom offers creative and powerful uses of film in the business school classroom and surveys the pedagogical and performative value of watching films with students. This volume examines not only how film offers opportunities for learning and investigation, but also how they can be sources of ideological poison, self-delusion and mis-representation. Throughout the text, renowned contributors embrace film’s power to embark on new adventures of thought by inventing images and signs, and by bringing novel concepts and fresh perspectives to the classroom. If film often reveals organizational dysfunctionality and absurdity, it also teaches us to understand the other, to see difference, and to accept experimentation. A wide spectra of films are examined for their pedagogical value in terms of what can be learned, explored and discussed by teaching with film and how film can be used as a tool of research and investigation. The book sees film in the classroom as an educational challenge wherein rich learning and personal development are encouraged.
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Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art / Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek 68 (2018)

Lessons in Art. Art, Education, and Modes of Instruction since 1500

Edited by Ann-Sophie Lehmann and Bart Ramakers

Why, how, to whom and by whom was art taught? Lessons in Art (Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art, Vol 68) provides new answers to these questions by addressing the relation between art and education in the Netherlands from 1500 to the 1970s. The authors gathered in this volume consider the practical education of artists within a wide societal context. They present new ways of looking at teaching materials and methods and show how art was employed as a powerful teaching aid. From early-modernity to the present, education, it appears, fuels the production and perception of art.

Table of Contents
1. Ann-Sophie Lehmann & Bart Ramakers, Introduction
2. Caecilie Weissert, Clément Perret’s Exercitatio alphabetica (1569). A calligraphic textbook and sample book on eloquence
3. Koen Jonckheere, Aertsen, Rubens and the questye in early modern painting
4. Edward H. Wouk, From Lambert Lombard to Aby Warburg. Pathosformel as grammar
5. Bart Ramakers, Paper, paint, and metal foil. How to costume a tyrant in late sixteenth century Holland
6. Jenny Boulboullé, Drawn up by a learned physician from the mouths of artisans. The Mayerne manuscript revisited
7. Erin Travers, Jacob van der Gracht’s Anatomie for artists
8. Julie Remond, ‘Draw everything that exists in the world’. ’t Light der Teken en Schilderkonst and the shaping of art education in early modern northern Europe
9. Ann-Sophie Lehmann, An alphabet of colours. Painting as practice and metaphor in seventeenth-century pedagogy
10. Joost Keizer, Rembrandt’s nature. The ethics of teaching style in the Dutch Republic
11. Erin Downey, Learning in Netherlandish workshops in seventeenth-century Rome
12. Annemarie Kok, Do it yourself! Lessons in participation in a dynamic labyrinth in the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
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Art Therapy in Australia

Taking a Postcolonial, Aesthetic Turn

Edited by Andrea J. Gilroy, Sheridan Linnell, Jill Westwood and Tarquam McKenna

Art Therapy in Australia: Taking a Postcolonial, Aesthetic Turn explores and enacts established and emergent art therapy histories, narratives and practices in the specific postcolonial context of contemporary Australia. It is the first published book to attempt to map this terrain. In doing so, the book aims to document important aspects of art therapy in Australia, including how Australian approaches both reiterate and challenge the dominant discourse of art therapy. This book is as much a performance as an account of the potential of art therapy to honour alterity, illuminate possibilities and bear witness to the intrapsychic, relational and social realms. The book offers a selective window into the rambling assemblage that is art therapy in the ‘Great Southern Land’.

Contributors are: Jan Allen, Bronwyn Davies, Claire Edwards, Nicolette Eisdell, Patricia Fenner, John Henzell, Pam Johnston, Lynn Kapitan, Carmen Lawson, Sheridan Linnell, Tarquam McKenna, Michelle Moss, Suzanne Perry, Josephine Pretorius, Jean Rumbold, Victoria Schnaedelbach, Lilian Tan, Jody Thomson, Jill Westwood, and Davina Woods.