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Translation and the Dissemination of Classical Chinese Literature
One into Many: Translation and the Dissemination of Classical Chinese Literature is the first anthology of its kind in English that deals in depth with the translation of Chinese texts, literary and philosophical, into a host of Western and Asian languages: English, French, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Hebrew, Slovak and Korean. After an introduction by the editor, in which multiple translations are compared to the many lives lived by the original in its new incarnations, thirteen articles are presented in three different sections. The first, Beginnings, comprises three articles that give accounts of how the earliest European translations of Chinese texts were undertaken. In Texts, four articles examine, separately, translated classical Chinese texts in the three genres of poetry, the short story and the novel. Constituting the third section are six articles addressing the different traditions into which Chinese literature has been translated over the centuries. Rounding off the whole anthology is a discussion of the culturalist perspective in which translations of the Chinese classics have been viewed in the past decade or so. A glossary and an index at the back provide easy reference to the reader interested in the source materials and allow him to undertake research in a rich area that is still not adequately explored.
China and the World Entering the 21st Century
This volume offers unique interdisciplinary views on issues in communication and culture with a central focus on Chinese perspectives as China and the world face the 21st century. These perspectives are based upon comparative data and East-West cross-cultural experience. Seventeen chapters, plus an introductory chapter that places the topics in perspective, report and interpret data here for the first time. The majority of the contributors are Chinese scholars from various disciplines, who now share their research on communication with Western as well as Eastern readers. The common thread of the essays is the way in which communication influences culture and cultural dimensions impact the processes of communication. The authors represent scholars from education, communication studies, mass communication, intercultural communication, sociology, rhetoric, literature, law, linguistics, telecommunications, international relations, journalism, and sociolinguistics.
Part I presents cultural perspectives on ethics, East-West relations, translation issues, cross-cultural competence, persuasion, journalistic acculturation, and gender representation in advertisements. Part II addresses international and intercultural communication as seen in comparative campus cultures, cross-cultural interaction between Chinese and Americans, the practice of taijiquan, the media depiction of watching, the legal implications of the internet, and the issues of nation building. Part III focuses on mediated communication issues in Chinese films, China's media campaign for the olympics, Chinese youth's use of Western media, talk radio in China, and the use of new technologies in the post-Cold War era.