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U.S. and Soviet Cultural Diplomacy, 1945–1990
In Cold War in Universities: U.S. and Soviet Cultural Diplomacy, 1945–1990 Natalia Tsvetkova recounts how the United States and the Soviet Union aspired to transform overseas academic institutions according to their political aims during the Cold War.
The book depicts how U.S. and Soviet attempts to impose certain values, disciplines, teaching models, structures, statutes, and personnel at universities in divided Germany, Afghanistan, Ethiopia, both Vietnams, and Cuba as well as Guatemala were foiled by sabotage, ignorance, and resistance on the part of the local academic elite, particularly professors.
Often at odds with local academic communities, U.S. and Soviet university policies endured unexpected frustrations as their efforts toward Americanization and Sovietization faced developmental setbacks, grassroots resistance, and even political fear.
Russian Literature for Children and Teens, 1991–2017
Volume Editors: Andrea Lanoux, Kelly Herold, and Olga Bukhina
Growing Out of Communism explores the rise of a new body of literature for children and teens following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the subsequent transformation of the publishing industry.
Lanoux, Herold, and Bukhina first consider the Soviet foundations of the new literature, then chart the huge influx of translated literature into Russia in the 1990s. In tracing the development of new literature that reflects the lived experiences of contemporary children and teens, the book examines changes to literary institutions, dominant genres, and archetypal heroes. Also discussed are the informal networks and online reader responses that reflect the views of child and teen readers.
Series Editors: Christina Lodder and Jeffrey Brooks
Original work on the culture and history of Russia throughout the centuries; cultural, ethnic and national identity, social and political history, popular culture, visual and performing arts, architecture and cinema, gender studies, children and youth culture, oral history and memory.

Until Volume 22, the series was published by Brill, click here.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Author: Sigrun Haude
At its core, Coping with Life during the Thirty Years’ War (1618–1648) explores how people tried to survive the Thirty Years’ War, on what resources they drew, and how they attempted to make sense of it. A rich tapestry of stories brings to light contemporaries’ trauma as well as women and men’s unrelenting initiatives to stem the war’s negative consequences. Through these close-ups, Sigrun Haude shows that experiences during the Thirty Years’ War were much more diverse and often more perplexing than a straightforward story line of violence and destruction can capture. Life during the Thirty Years’ War was not a homogenous vale of gloom and doom, but a multifaceted story that was often heartbreaking, yet, at times, also uplifting.
Author: Anna Muś
In The Political Potential of Upper Silesian Ethnoregionalist Movement: A Study in Ethnic Identity and Political Behaviours of Upper Silesians Anna Muś offers a study on the phenomenon of ethnoregionalism in one of the regions in Poland. Since 1945, ethnopolitics in Poland have been based on the so-called assumption of the ethnic homogeneity of the Polish nation. Even the transformation of the political system to a fully democratic one in 1989 did not truly change it. However, over the last three decades, we can observe growing discontent in Upper Silesia and the politicisation of Silesian ethnicity. This is happening in a region with its own history of autonomy and culturally diversified society, where an ethnoregionalist political movement appeared already in 1989.
The author displays the complex constitutional history of Serbia as a case study, following the evolution of the most important concepts such as human rights and the rule of law.
The first part of the book („Developments“) displays the main events as a chronological narrative, also giving a sketch of the history of Serbian legal institutions. The second part („The Evolution of Constitutionalism“) follows the evolution of two principal constitutional concepts i.e. human rights and the rule of law in Serbia. The third part („Serbia and Yugoslavia“) analyses the specific historical dimensions of Serbian constitutionalism in its relationship with the history of the Balkan peninsula.
Übersetzung und wissenschaftliche Redaktion von Bernard Wiaderny
Editor / Translator: Bernard Wiaderny
Zwei führende polnische Zeithistoriker schildern die jüngste Geschichte ihres Landes vom deutschen Überfall 1939 bis zur Gegenwart.
Andrzej Friszke und Antoni Dudek sind nicht nur namhafte polnische Historiker, sondern auch Zeitzeugen und scharfe Beobachter der aktuellen politischen Entwicklung ihres Landes. Mit dem Schwerpunkt auf Politik- und Sozialgeschichte geben sie einen Überblick über die Geschicke des Landes, beginnend mit der Zeit der deutschen Besatzung Polens, und die Etablierung des kommunistischen Systems. Die Rolle der Opposition und der katholischen Kirche in der Volksrepublik, die Entstehung der Gewerkschaft „Solidarność“ (an der Friszke aktiv beteiligt war) sowie die politische Transformation seit 1989 werden breit behandelt. Besonderen Wert gewinnt das Buch durch die Berücksichtigung der zeithistorisch bislang kaum erfassten 2000er Jahre.
The Policy of Belarusization, 1924-1929
Author: Alena Marková
The book sheds light on processes of Belarusian nation-building and identity formation during the interwar period. It provides a complete analysis of the Soviet policy of Belarusization in interwar Belarus (1924-1929).

The analysis covers issues pertaining to the formation of national identity, the incorporation of the Belarusian national language into educational and administrative spheres within the policy of Belarusization and its acceptance by the dif-
ferent strata of the multi-ethnic society in the BSSR of that period. The monograph also sheds light on the reasons for the launching and ceasing of that policy as well as on the interrelation between the Communist Party and the
Belarusian national intelligentsia.