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Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only scholarly publication devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole.

Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent
Please click here for the online version including the abstracts of the articles of the African Yearbook of International Law.
In this commentary, Sabine Witting provides a comprehensive analysis of the Second Optional Protocol to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child concerning the sale of children, ‘child prostitution’ and ‘child pornography’. This commentary critically reflects on the impact of globalisation, digital technologies and the COVID-19 pandemic on the nature, scope and meaning of the Second Optional Protocol since its adoption on 25 May 2000. Apart from analysing a broad range of topics ranging from online child sexual abuse to surrogacy and ‘voluntourism’, this commentary highlights the importance of establishing child-friendly transnational collaboration mechanisms, conceptualised through a holistic gender lens and taking into consideration the online-offline nexus of violence against children and relevant Global North-Global South dynamics.
Citizenship Revocation in the 21st Century: Legal, Political and Moral Implications
Over the past two decades, denationalisation – the controversial practice of revoking citizenship from unwanted citizens – has re-entered Western law and politics with astonishing haste. In Denationalisation and its Discontents, Christian Prener traces this remarkable development in the United Kingdom, Denmark and France and offers a timely and critical examination of the legal, moral, and political acceptability of citizenship revocation in response to acts of misconduct or disloyalty.

Through an exploration of contemporary practices, caselaw and theory, the book distils some of the hard questions posed by the Western revival of citizenship within international human rights law, moral philosophy and political theory as it probes the lawfulness, efficacy, and political legitimacy of revoking citizenship in the 21st century.
This volume addresses key ethical issues and challenges of modern urban warfare through ten chapters written by acclaimed experts from eight different countries and three continents. Foreword to the volume was written by Gen. (ret) Mart de Kruif, while Professor Hugo Slim wrote the Introduction.
In addition to providing the reader with the history of the intricate relationship between city and war, authors offer critical insights into the ethical problems arising from various dimensions of modern urban warfare: conflicting war narratives, imperative of victory, tactical and leadership specificities, use of non-lethal measures, international interventions, in bello peculiarities of urban warfare, introduction of new weapons and technologies, use of war games and simulations in training for urban warfare, and many more.
In clear and concise words, this Handbook offers a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of the European Convention and the European Court of Human Rights and its case-law. Numerous cross-references guide the reader through the various topics. Various summaries condense the different principles of the Court’s case-law.
The Handbook has been written largely for practitioners such as lawyers, judges and persons in administrative functions, but will also be invaluable to university teachers and academic researchers. Meticulously compiled, authoritative and practical, it is a must-have resource for anyone concerned with the protection of human rights in Europe.
The author served as a Judge at the Court for nine years, three of them as Section President. He is a retired Professor for International and European Law at the University of Zurich in Switzerland.

With a Foreword by Judge Robert Spano, President of the European Court of Human Rights.
Indigenous Peoples, Natural Resources and Permanent Sovereignty explores the possibility to conceive a permanent sovereignty over natural resources vested in indigenous peoples rather than in States.
The author examines the conceptualization and content under customary international law of indigenous rights with respect to natural resources, including the impact of the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007.
The book provides a deep and updated analysis on international customs, international and regional conventions and the jurisprudence of regional courts concerning indigenous rights to natural resources, including the most recent developments in domestic jurisprudence and legislation.
Author: Zamira Xhaferri
This book examines the law and practice of the delegation of rulemaking powers to the European Commission. It combines legal doctrine with empirical research methods to bridge the gap between “law on the books” and “law in action” to fully appreciate the meaning and the impact of the changes post-Lisbon. The results of the empirical case study provide food for thought on how the current legal framework regime for delegated rulemaking by the European Commission could be improved. The findings seek to contribute to the academic and policy debates on this research topic that is likely to continue in forthcoming years.