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The Peregrine Profession

Transnational Mobility of Nordic Engineers and Architects, 1880-1930

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Per-Olof Grönberg

In The Peregrine Profession Per-Olof Grönberg offers an account of the pre-1930 transnational mobility of engineers and architects educated in the Nordic countries 1880-1919. Outlining a system where learning mobility was more important than labour market mobility, the author shows that more than every second graduate went abroad. Transnational mobility was stronger from Finland and Norway than from Denmark and Sweden, partly because of slower industrialisation and deficiencies in the domestic technical education. This mobility included all parts of the world but concentrated on the leading industrial countries in German speaking Europe and North America. Significant majorities returned and became agents of technology transfer and technical change. Thereby, these mobile graduates also became important for Nordic industrialisation

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Edited by Olga Katsiardi-Hering and Maria A. Stassinopoulou

The Danube has been a border and a bridge for migrants and goods since antiquity. Between the 17th and the 19th centuries, commercial networks were formed between the Ottoman Empire and Central and Eastern Europe creating diaspora communities. This gradually led to economic and cultural transfers connecting the Mediterranean, the Black Sea, and the Continental world of commerce. The contributors to the present volume offer different perspectives on commerce and entrepreneurship based on the interregional treaties of global significance, on cultural and ecclesiastical relations, population policy and demographical aspects. Questions of identity, family, and memory are in the centre of several chapters as they interact with the topographic and socio-anthropological territoriality of all the regions involved.

Contributors are: Constantin Ardeleanu, Iannis Carras, Lidia Cotovanu, Lyubomir Georgiev, Olga Katsiardi-Hering, Dimitrios Kontogeorgis, Nenad Makuljević, Ikaros Mantouvalos, Anna Ransmayr, Vaso Seirinidou, Maria A. Stassinopoulou.

Across the German Sea

Early Modern Scottish Connections with the Wider Elbe-Weser Region

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Kathrin Zickermann

In Across the German Sea: Early Modern Scottish Connections with the Wider Elbe-Weser Region Zickermann analyses the commercial, maritime and military relations between Scotland and the German cities (Hamburg, Bremen) and territories (Bremen and Verden, Holstein, Braunschweig-Lüneburg) located alongside the lower parts of the rivers Elbe and Weser. Based on a wealth of British, German and Scandinavian archival material, the study demonstrates the importance of the region for Scottish commodity exchange and network building across political borders, whilst contributing significantly to our understanding of the formation of Scottish communities abroad. It also shows that Scottish commercial, political, military and religious activities within the region – which featured a Danish-Norwegian and Swedish dimension - were intertwined and cannot be studied in isolation.

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Edited by Christopher Lloyd, Jacob Metzer and Richard Sutch

Settler colonialism was a major aspect of the imperial age that began in the sixteenth century and has encompassed the whole world unto the present. Modern settler societies have together constituted one of the major routes to economic development from their foundation in resource abundance and labour scarcity. This book is a major and wide-ranging comparative historical enquiry into the experiences of the settler world. The roles of indigenous dispossession, large-scale immigrant labour, land abundance, trade, capital, and the settler institutions, are central to this economic formation and its history. The chapters examine those economies that emerged as genuine colonial hybrids out of their differing neo-European backgrounds, with distinctive post-independence structures and an institutional persistence into the present as independent states.

Contributors include Stanley Engerman, Susan Carter, Henry Willebald, Luis Bertola, Claude Lützelschwab, Frank Tough, Kathleen Dimmer, Tony Ward, Drew Keeling, Carl Mosk, David Meredith, Martin Shanahan, John K Wilson, Bernard Attard, Grietjie Verhoef, Tim Rooth, Francine McKenzie, Jorge Alvarez, Jim McAloon, as well as the editors.

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Virgil Ciocîltan

The inclusion of the Black Sea basin into the long-distance trade network – with its two axes of the Silk Road through the Golden Horde (Urgench-Sarai-Tana/Caffa) and the Spice Road through the Ilkhanate (Ormuz-Tabriz-Trebizond) – was the two Mongol states’ most important contribution to making the sea a “crossroads of international commerce”.
The closest recorded working relationship between European and Asian powers in the medieval period, achieved by the joint efforts of the Chinggisid rulers and the Italian merchant republics, was not realised via the usual geographic channels of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Fertile Crescent, but rather by roundabout routes to the Black Sea. Thus at the same time as the sea fulfilled its function as a crossroads of long-distance Eurasian trade, it was also a bypass.

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Friedrich Lenger

In European Cities in the Modern Era, 1850-1914 Friedrich Lenger analyses the demographic and economic preconditions of European urbanization, compares the extent to which Europe’s cities were characterized by heterogeneity with respect to the social, national and religious composition of its population and asks in which way differences resulting from this heterogeneity were resolved either peacefully or violently.

Using this general perspective and extending the scope by including Eastern and Southern Europe the dominant view of Europe’s prewar cities as islands of modernity is challenged and the ubiquity of urban violence established as a central analytical problem.

Farming in a Global Economy

A Case Study of Dutch Immigrant Farmers in Canada

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Frans Schryer

Using a Canadian case study, this book demonstrates that Dutch immigrant farmers have a global competitive advantage. It also deals with the implications, both beneficial and harmful, of positive stereotyping, in this case the reputation of the Dutch as successful farmers. Farming in a Global Economy consists of three parts. The first provides an overview of farming and migration in the Netherlands and Ontario. Part two deals with Dutch farmers in Ontario from a historical and a sociological perspective, telling the story of postwar farm immigrants, much of it in their own words. The last part covers the Dutch presence in, and impact on, Ontario agriculture.